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Summer Breeze - Core Sound 17, Mk-3


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Here is Sumer Breeze with her new ownwers, Dale and Kristi in Florida.

Oh, man, I just can't do that again. I've done a few small sailboats with all the filleting and taping and mixing and sanding. I also did a round few strip/glass canoes with all the mixing and sanding

After considerable research and development, I've found surgical tubing makes the finest slingshot engine.

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frowley, I used two part Sherwin Williams waterborne polyurethane on the hull, sprayed (more on that in a minute), and twp part S.W. epoxy on the deck, rolled on. I would have preferred regular petroleum based poly but I already have neuropathy from years of fiberglass boat building and I don't need to aggravate that. The isocyanates in that stuff are VERY toxic. They go right through your skn, eyes, etc. You need an air supplied mask and impervious clothing to spray it. It can be rolled and tipped, but I wanted to try something else.

 

The waterborne materials are very thick and can't be thinned or sprayed with a conventional tip that most of us had on our spray guns. I tried spraying with mine and it went VERY slow.Then my compressor couldn't keep up. It's only 2 hp. The material will work well if you use the same tip that you would use for a heavy bodied primer. I forgot that I had a modified gun that I used to spray metal flake with. I drilled out the tip. I think it was to 5/64ths. You can find a video on U-tube on how to do that. It would have been fine---with a bigger compressor.

 

I rolled but did not "tip" the deck. i used a foam roller. the finish has a bit of a rough surface left by the roller, which I don't mind. (Think "work boat".) I didn't try tipping so I don't know if that would have smoothed it. I didn't try to spray because of my air supply problem. Also, I'm told that the epoxy finish will not hold a shine in the weather. My boat is kept under cover so that was not a consideration.

 

What this all boils down to is: I think that the Sherwin Williams Industrial waterborne poly is a good choice given the right spray equipment. I don't think that I would use the epoxy though. I've heard mixed reviews on waterborne marine poly made specifically for boats when roll and tipped. Some like it and some don't. I'll have to go out to my storage shed and get the numbers for the Sherwin product if you want to use it. I'll also see if I can find the U-tube video that I mentioned. By-the-way, Sherwin also makes a conventional petrolium based two part poly if you can protect yourself when you spray it. I'm sure you could also roll and tip it. Or for "a few dollars more", you could just go ahead and use tried and true marine grade materials from somewhere like Duckworks. I just like to live dangerously and try new things. To "sum up", I'd use the Sherwin poly again.

 

 

You can use any other gun to modify, but check to see that there is enough material around the "hole" that you can drill it out to 5/64. Some guns don't.

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Whooooopie, y'all!!! Gallows are built! That's the last of the pieces to be made except for the fun little stuff on the interior. Now it's time to poxy, sand, paint, sand, varnish, sand, clean, mount hardware, rig----oh, yeah, still gotta make the masts. Did I say that I gotta sand? Anyway, We're on the last stages. As the great Dave Lucas, the Bard of Bradenton says: "Now that you've got it 90% done, you've only got 90% to go..." Yep, that sounds about right.

 

The boom gallows---NO not THAT kind of gallows---old west justice stuff... As I was saying before being so rudely interrupted by the Peanut Gallery, the gallows is (are?) adustable in height to allow lots of seating height under the lowered main mast, but will be in the lower setting for trailering and storage. The Master is working on a design for a combination sail cover/storage bag for the sails with full battens in place so the sails, battens, sprits and all can be left in place while travelling.

 

post-1823-0-70601900-1458318374_thumb.jpg Here 'tis.

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Chick,

Why do you epoxy spars when you will also have to varnish them with a uv blocker. Not being immersed in water, won't the varnish keep them waterproof from rain, hail, etc?

Pete,

I like to lay down a coat or two of epoxy underneath all my brightwork.  It is the equivalent of about four or five coats of varnish, filling in a lot of little nooks and crannies in the grain.  It also bonds better to the wood than varnish.  It's almost like cheating.

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Thanks Chick, for the really detailed and thoughtful reply. Don't bother too much about the numbers - I'm pretty sure I can figure it out since I doubt SW has a broad range of 2-part waterborne polyurethane coatings to choose from. And thanks for your comments about spraying. I have an HVLP rig that I'd probably use if I could get a tip that would work. Good to hear you say you'd use it again. 

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Chick, quick question.On your outboard motor mount does the well give you enough clearance to tip the motor so that the prop won't be in the water when she is healed. I am trying to decide what to do and I like your scheme. I just wonder if it tips enough.

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There's a couple of trains of thought on epoxying spars. I don't, though will use epoxy to bond spar parts together. The reason is as previously described, to save the maintenance associated with clear finishes. The same is true of other clear coated surfaces, where abrasion and wear will not be very high. Maintaining clear finishes are hard enough without the complication of epoxy, which also needs the UV protection. Simply put, if some varnish or polyurethane gets UV damage, you scuff it up, apply some more and you're good to go. If an epoxy coated surface under a clear coat gets some UV damage, you now have to fix the underlying epoxy and the clear coat. The only exception to this rule (for me) is for abrasion protection, in which case, some light fabrics will also be involved.

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Today's progress report. All of the small parts except the centerboard have been spray varnished using Captains Varnish. Some of the parts are only done on one side. When these parts are dry, I'll flip them and varnish the other side. I also sprayed a couple of coats on the transom, but got some runs that will need to be sanded out and resprayed---with thinner coats. The centerboard gets coated with paint. 

 

The rails, hatch coamings, tabernacles,  and other parts that are part of the hull will be brush varnished. Too much trouble masking them all to spray--- not to mention getting overspray and fumes all over the garage and in the house.

 

Here are some pictures:

 

post-1823-0-02706000-1458839219_thumb.jpg    post-1823-0-74533600-1458839222_thumb.jpg  

 

post-1823-0-87653700-1458839225_thumb.jpg    post-1823-0-57279600-1458839229_thumb.jpg

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Dumb question for you guys. I just finished varnishing all of my trim on the outside of the Breeze . (About 5:00 Thursday) It's the first coat. That's after substantial time spent masking it all off. Question: Do you think I can get away with leaving the tape on until tomorrow afternoon about 4:00. Or will the edge of the tape be stuck to the varnish?

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I always remove the tape right after painting/varnishing, so it doesn't tear the dry film. It also tends to leave a softer edge when pulled right away. Work with thinner brush or roller "loads" on vertical surfaces, to avoid issues. You can also use a thinner to help prevent too heavy a film thickness (which leads to problems). Thin coats, lot so them, don't get greedy now . . .

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I go 2 coats between maskings.  I will "cut" the varnish at the tape edge with a brand new utility blade and a light touch.  I will do the last coat with fresh masking and remove it immediately.  The varnish from the last coat fills any knife kerf left.  More than 2 coats per masking is looking for trouble for sure.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's been awhile since talking to y'all. Lots of non-boat stuff going on, but a little has been achieved on Summer Breeze. Centerboard is in the trunk but awaiting help from Miss Debbie to insert the pivot pin. I'll be underneath moving the board around trying to align the holes and she'll be "wiggling" the pin in place.

 

Rudder is finished and hung. I don't trust the little tab that is suppose to keep the pintles from "jumping out" so I drill a hole through the pintle below the gudgeon for a cotter pin. The ladder is mounted. I should have installed it much lower on the transom. It's gonna hang up the mizzen sheet badly. Today I'll install most of the deck hardware including mooring cleats, mast rigging stuff, hatch hinges etc. Some stuff will await actually stepping the yet-to-be-built masts to be sure it goes where it will be positioned correctly. The forward mooring/anchoring cleats need to provide a good lead to the bow sprit/anchor chocks but not interfere with any of the sail controls that come down the mast to deck turning blocks.

 

I'm hoping that Thrillsbe will help me lace leather on my sprits. He did a beautiful job on his! 

 

The "in-the-hole" picture is of the Anderson bailer on the starbord side and a drain-style plug to let water into the ballast tank on the port. I may add a pump later after I see if the tank really needs to be filled all the way to the bottom of the cockpit sole and if the bailer will clear the tank as designed. It will be interesting to see the different solutions from the other Mk-3 builders.

 

post-1823-0-38165300-1459869935_thumb.jpg  I kinda like my lock for the companionway and the little carved thingy for decoration.

 

post-1823-0-13165700-1459869932_thumb.jpg  Rudder, ladder and boom gallows. I used a regular brass boat drain tube in the motor well.

 

post-1823-0-35162300-1459869928_thumb.jpg  "In-the-hole"

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Your boat is looking like it is almost finished. I cant wait to hear your review once completed. I will be building this boat someday and I hope that by then all the bugs are sorted out as far as the centerboard goes.

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Here are some pictures of the main mast rigging back to the cockpit and the fore deck layout. Now I'm off to starting to build my masts and adding hinges, hold downs and latches to the hatches. Hey, that's kinda catchy...latches to the hatches, latches to the hatches...

 

 

post-1823-0-76889200-1460039093_thumb.jpg  Straps that hook up with snap buttons keep the lines out of the way. Reefing lines will go to port.

 

post-1823-0-08697900-1460039097_thumb.jpg  Cleats serve for docking and anchoring.

 

post-1823-0-18454400-1460039100_thumb.jpg  The anchor rode will go through the chocks on either port or starboard, not over the end of the sprit. 

 

 

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Looking great Chick. I'm hoping you will have her at the messabout this fall. Anyone who is from the north that wants a ride, contact me.I'm planning on going, pulling my Scamp camper and putting the Spindrift 11N on the roof of my Pilot. It's turning into a busy sailing season so I've decided that rushing the CS20.3 (I need a name for her) would be silly.  Anyone who is from the north that wants a ride, contact me.

 

1. Anyway, does the gallows stay on or is that just for transport?

2. Can you reach all the way to that anchor standing in the hatch?

3. What is your plan for cleats on the stern?

4. How did you support the bowsprit? Could you stand on it?

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Dale. I may try going over the sprit if it's not too rough or windy. I didn't build in a gusset or knee to support it as strongly as it should be. Bad planning.

 

Steve. We'll definitely be at the B&B messabout---good Lord willin' and the crick don't rise. Gosh, I wish I could carry the Breeze on top of my van and pull our camper down. Miss Debbie might come if I could do that.

 

1. The gallows will stay. If it interferes with the sail or sprit, I can lower it for sailing, but it will still be in place. The legs telescope for that reason. I had this same       arrangement on my CS-20 Mk-2 and it worked really well.

2. Yes, but I only have to reach to the base of the bowsprit to release it from it's "latch".

3. The stern cleats are on top of the coaming just ahead of the gallows.

4. See above note to Dale. Why would I want to stand on it?  :rolleyes: The very short deck made for a difficult job of having enough room for mounting the sprit and         still allowing a long enough opening to let the foot of the mast swing through. If it breaks, I'll just go back and re-build it stronger. Actually, I think it's gonna be       ok. Maybe I'll try standing on it and bouncing a little. Maybe.

 

Grrr, why does posting this change the spacing in the sentences???

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