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Hirilonde

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Hirilonde last won the day on April 29

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About Hirilonde

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  • Birthday 01/01/1

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    Charlestown, RI

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  1. I believe every word you spoke about installing the fendering. Be prepared to change your mind about towing. It's been known to happen.
  2. You won't regret your fendering job. As long as you get the oars out of the way you can crash into Chessie.
  3. There isnt a single glue, bedding or paint that sticks well to those plastics. The key is to waterproof the fastener intrusions. I like brass best. Bronze is beautiful, but too heavy.
  4. I made laminated combings for all my boats. After reading this forum since the start I would probably screw from the top too. Well placed screws, carefully sunk to the same depth don't bother me at all. There is beauty in function but not always function in beauty.
  5. When I use epoxy I always smear both mating surfaces and use enough to assure squeeze out all around. I either clean it wet with solvent or trim it off when partially cured. Some mask first, I usually can't be bothered. Epoxy is a gap filler, when a little filler is used and clamping too tight starves the joint. Boat looks great.
  6. Best excuse ever for selling a power boat! 😉
  7. I believe you, but then few trailered boats are that light, including the Mk 3s. And the only boat at my marina that was very light was mine. As several have pointed out, ramp angles vary a lot. One of the ramps I used at work was so steep I could submerge my trailer without even my hitch reaching the water's edge. Add LED lights and a good trailer rinse and I would choose submerging so I could float my boat on and off. I don't like abusing my equipment, but if a little extra impact on the trailer makes my life easy then I can live with it.
  8. 8 years of managing a small boat marina and the only really successful dry launches and hauls I have seen require many rollers (hull and keel) and a power winch. Your trough and a deep set may just be the best way to solo.
  9. The reason I suggested it was because it seems you want to keep your bearings dry. Your boat wouldn't achieve the position in your sketch during a shallow launch or haul.
  10. What about a roller at the end of the trough?
  11. If you go with a Torqueedo, maybe consider that it stores somewhere besides in place. No oil or gas to spill in doing so. And you can make an insert to fill the hole when sailing.
  12. Worthy considerations Amos. Though built very differently, the mold for a Lapwing becomes part of the boat, bulkheads and inboard sides of side seat/tanks. One of the bulkheads gets a major portion of it cut out, but the same issue of deforming under strain during construction exists. I cut out the corners of the holes with hole saw blades of appropriate diameter before, so that I had easy straight cuts for after. I calculated my jigsaw would fit for doing these straight sections.
  13. I don't think anyone on this forum has tried a 2 part LPU. I would think it would crack like spider webs. The paint is hard and brittle over a flexible surface. I used oil based porch and deck enamel as it foot the bill and could be custom mixed to a bazzilion colors shown on chips.
  14. I always cut outside the line and tweak on my belt, disc and drum sanders.
  15. I never put them in my Spindrift and after 8 seasons of casual use and 2 of leaving it in the water for the whole 5 months I have experienced no issues. I highly recommend a light colored interior (at least) if you do not install them. Mine is a white hull with pale green interior.
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