Jump to content

Summer Breeze - Core Sound 17, Mk-3


Recommended Posts

The bristles on Grandpa's brush are 3" long. The cross section is oval including the handle. It's a nice easy grip that naturally resists rotational torque. I don't think it's hand carved nor turned on a regular lathe. Maybe on the thing that turns out assymetrical ax handles. I counted 5 x 14 sets of bristles. The wood handle isn't a hard wood like oak, ash, or maple. But it's that color and close grained. And I don't think it's pine or poplar. Maybe spruce?

When I acquired the brush some 40 years ago, it had a 1/8" hole thru the end of its handle. I think it had a string thru the hole. Don't know if Grandpa drilled the hole -- could be it was always there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Replies 611
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Here is Sumer Breeze with her new ownwers, Dale and Kristi in Florida.

Oh, man, I just can't do that again. I've done a few small sailboats with all the filleting and taping and mixing and sanding. I also did a round few strip/glass canoes with all the mixing and sanding

After considerable research and development, I've found surgical tubing makes the finest slingshot engine.

Posted Images

I'm pretty sure the front one is a hand made handle/body. It was likely roughed out on a bandsaw, then a belt sander and eventually finish profiled by hand, which would have been cheaper back then, because of labor costs.

 

post-304-0-90432100-1456555625_thumb.jpg

 

The one in the back has a "6" and "Sterilized" on it, the one in front is softer, with longer hairs and not a single marking. They both seem to be pine or possibly white spruce, though the grain looks more like pine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Amine blush is a water soluble byproduct, resulting from the environmental interaction, with the surface molecules of the curing epoxy. This is mostly moisture related, but the blush is easily removed, with a quick wash. I use a very diluted dishwashing soap (and water of course), because of it's very alkaline nature (just like the amines). On finish coats, I'll wash with a "Scotch Brite" pad, killing two birds with the same stone (toothing up the surface as I wash). Once washed, rinse it off and dry. It's now ready for sanding or whatever. Mike is correct, just sanding will just smear it around, though a lot of it will be removed, some spots will remain. In a lot of situations this is okay, especially if you're using an aggressive grit. The butt kicker to this approuch (just sanding) is when you apply a finish over it, that doesn't like amines and you get fisheyes, which will piss off the most hardened amongst us. To be sure as I mentioned, always assume you have a blush; wash, rinse and dry after it's cured, then move onto the next steps.

 

The only guaranteed way around this is excellent environment controls. PeelPly, mylar overlays, vacuum bag and infusion can offer some if not all of these controls (you're preventing the environment from touching the exposed epoxy surface during the cure).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pete, I just open Notepad (Any word processing software will do) and type my message. Then I paste here. Two commands you should know assuming you are in Windows. Ctrl-C is copy, Ctr-L is paste. But short of leaving your browser open, I don't think there is a way to save for later.

Ctr-L does't work for "paste" on my computer.  I've always used Ctr-V for that.  If one doesn't work, the other will, I suppose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, back to the Breeze. Good weather today---but donchaknow---several "life" things have come uo to keep me gone a lot. Grrrrr....

 

Should at least be able to finish vacuuming, brushing, washing, wiping, etc. to be ready to mask off non-skid areas, ready to apply paint and "sand".

 

Would a layer of epoxy with "sand" sprinkled on it be as good as paint??? ("Sand"---actually non-skid paint additive from Lowes.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The non-skid additive from Lowe's and the other big box stores are usually polyurethane or rubber (latex). You don't want to use sand, unless you're going to sell this before it needs to be redone. Epoxy, even with a particulate added will still need UV protection. If you mix aluminum oxide into the epoxy, you'll get some UV protection and if the aluminum oxide is a fairly big particulate, also can work as texture. This is what's used in industrial areas, but it's rough stuff and not bare butt or foot friendly, without an overcoat of some sort (paint, varnish, etc.).

 

Instead of of sprinkling particulates over wet goo, try making the texture in the wet goo itself.

 

post-304-0-80916800-1456807872_thumb.jpg

 

This texture is part of the epoxy coating, so it can't be knocked off the paint from abrasion and if you really want to, you can use a stripper to remove all the paint and still have the texture in place. This is the butt kicker with texture - it falls off eventually and tends to wear down, often taking paint with it.

 

To do this, apply the epoxy in the areas you want the texture (tape things off for waterways, around hardware, etc.). You can use straight epoxy or slightly thickened (like shown). I mixed in a small amount of milled fibers and silica, but not much, as you can see. Let this stand until it's getting close to going green, then using a dry roller, go over the surface, which will texture the goo. Since it's about to "go off", it doesn't have time to self level back down and the texture remains. The nice thing about this approuch is the textured areas are raised over the surrounding areas, making real "waterways", so think about how you layout these waterways, to shed water away from stuff.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks PAR. My plan was to sprinkle the nonskid additive into a coat of epoxy before painting over everything with my top coat. I like the "textured epoxy" idea. I used to apply nonskid this way on polyester (gelcoat) boats. Letting the epoxy get to the "almost green" stage is a trick I would never have thought of! I'll file this in my memory bank for use in "bright" areas on future boats. Do you use a short nap roller? I would think that a foam roller wouldn't pull enough texture up.

 

Yesterday I managed to squeeze in enough time between "life stuff" to get my nonskid areas taped off. Today I'll apply it. It'd gonna get cold and rainy again tonight and for the next few days, so I'll have to wait to topcoat until it warms up again. Looks like next Monday before that will happen. (The afore-mentioned "life" always interferes with weekends.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the image above the texture is pretty aggressive and yep, I used a short nap roller. I prefer to have more texture aggression than necessary, because I can knock it down with a DA and over coats (more goo or paint). It's a lot harder to make a less than desirable texture more aggressive, which is the logic here. Salt makes a pretty good particulate, if you want to do this route. Sprinkle it on the wet goo, until the surface has an 1/8" coating of salt. The epoxy will encapsulate some of it and what doesn't stick is vacumned off once it cures. Wash out any remaining salt and decide if you need to over coat with neat goo (to soften it up) or just move onto paint. Sugar works too. Both sand pretty easily too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Pete, I just open Notepad (Any word processing software will do) and type my message. Then I paste here. Two commands you should know assuming you are in Windows. Ctrl-C is copy, Ctr-L is paste. But short of leaving your browser open, I don't think there is a way to save for later.

Ctr-L does't work for "paste" on my computer.  I've always used Ctr-V for that.  If one doesn't work, the other will, I suppose.

 

Typo on my part. As for the non-skid, when I was at the wooden boat show in Mystic last spring/summer, there was a vendor who had a paint additive that was like rubber particulate. It looked really nice and was easy on the feet. I'll see if I can find the literature. On my Spindrift 11N, I was advised that crushed walnut shells were good as an additive. So I used a coffee grinder and milled my own. It is truly non skid, but my knees do not approve, so don't do that!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a shot of some poorly done salt on the interior of a model.

This is paint, covered in salt, let to dry, brushed off, and painted with two more coats of paint.

This is a model of a duckboat, so, no I did not mask carefully.

It does feel very grippy and pleasant...

post-4050-0-38210900-1456842955_thumb.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I got some of Jamestown's inhouse Total Boat brand nonskid paint that i'm planning to use on the cockpit floor.  haven't tried it yet, unfortunately, but i'm very curious and will of course report results.

 

on my previous boat, a Redmond Bluegill, I did "non-skid varnish" for the floor surface.  I mixed Interlux nonskid grit with the final coat of varnish that I applied over the epoxy smoothcoat. Worked ok.  My brother-in-law the fiberglass boat builder got a big kick out of that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I know y'all thought this old cracker boy was NEVER gonna get back in the shop, but I DID! The last couple of days have seen the application of two coats of Sherwin Williams waterborne epoxy paint applied to the decks. Masking tape first each day, then the paint rolled on with a foam 4 inch roller from Ace Hardware. But first, paint was laid down in the masked off non-skid areas and non-skid material was sprinkled on while the paint was wet. Then the next day, the loose sand was brushed off and vacuumed up. (Sorry guys, I don't have a fancy-shmancy brush from my gran-pa like y'all.) I woulda sprayed except for: 1. I didn't want the overspray all over everything, and 2. My silly little 2 HP compressor won't keep up with my spray gun with the drilled out tip that allows me to spray heavy material like the waterborne paints and primer.

 

Now, on to the rudder and c/b, tiller, spars, sanding and varnishing hatches and stuff, finish interior----heck, I'm already pooped just thinkin' about it all...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a progress report. Rudder and c/b are sanded, filled, lead attached, filled and faired, and glassed on one side. Having the blades already shaped on the mighty CNC machine is a GREAT time and effort saver---I LOVE it!!! Even came with the lead tip ready to attach. To me, the level 2 kit is well worth the price! I'll post some pics, then it's out to apply the second coat of poxy to the glass to fill the weave. Also gonna climb into the cabin to start building the sheave box for the c/b pennant. (I know---shoulda done that before decking when it woulda been easier to get to. Slow down and plan ahead. Nawww, too much effort for someone with adult ADD.) "There is always time to fix something, but not enough time to do it right the first time."

 

post-1823-0-21849000-1457644929_thumb.jpg  These are the blanks ready to glass. The c/b was stood on end with the lead tip bedded in poxy 'til cured.

 

post-1823-0-73404700-1457644941_thumb.jpg  Dry glass layed on. Note the extra layer over the joint where the lead is attached. (I don't pre-wet the wood.)

 

post-1823-0-24307200-1457644947_thumb.jpg  Glass wet out. It's rolled around the leading edge and allowed to project past the trailing edge.

 

post-1823-0-71416900-1457644952_thumb.jpg  Maybe you noticed this little guy hiding back here. It's the rudder head getting his poxy coat. The tiller will be pivoting.

 

Tomorrow, the blades get flipped over and the glass feathered where it wraps around the leading edge, then that side will be glassed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't sheath the lead. It's a lot easier to repair lead if it's naked (painted), then having to peel sheathing off a dent, just to pound it back into shape and resheath it again. The only time I like to 'glass lead is when it's a "puck" or other style of captured weight. Lead makes a great grounding shoe and is easily repaired if naked. When it like a leading edge or tip, I use some form of mechanical fastening and a good size faying surface.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.