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  1. Past hour
  2. Oyster

    19' custom built power skiff

    This is a framed plywood skiff. Its marine grade meranti plywood. The bottom is glassed . It is powered with a 2018 60 hp. Suzuki outboard, with full transferable warranty still in effect. It has Lowrance navigator system in addition to a Garmin Striker combo depth recorder. The bow cover is used for cooler weather trips and easily removable with bow strips. I have a bimini top for the summer time. There is a ton of storage under the casting platform. The forward console seat also has storage in it. Paint and varnish is all good. The trailer is road ready and boat is water ready. Hook up and hit the water. Both trailer and boat is titled and registered and active. Asking 15,000. The boat is currently Coast Guard Auxillary inspected . I will let the boat go with all of the gear, including type one PFDs.
  3. This engine was purchased May 2017. It has approx. 3 hours on it. It has an option for a remote tank hook up in addition to the built internal tank. . F, N, and R gears. I also have a brand new never been in the water 8 foot inflatable dinghy, with floor board slats. Located Morehead City. Runs perfect, I am upgrading to a different dinghy. I will split up the package if need be. engine 1,300 and dinghy 500, OBO
  4. Today
  5. Thrillsbe

    Building a Two Paw 8 for Trailer Camping

    The last few days have been chock full of “other stuff”. But, I did manage to make up a mast tube. I know that this is gilding the lily on an 8’ pram, but it is part of my current plan, anyway. Today and tomorrow I hope to fillet and tape seams!
  6. Yesterday
  7. HighDesert

    Utah OB20

    I haven't posted for a long time and decided that I should, just to make sure that no one accuses me of quitting on my project. I haven't. I haven't been moving it along very fast, but I'm still at it. Actually, I've spent lot's more time on it than one can tell by looking at it. My buddies, who at one time would ask, "Dude, how is that boat coming along?" now just go to my wife and say, "Is he okay?". What do they know? Boatbuilding is a delicious pursuit and I just take more time to savor it than most. Some time back, after coating the entire hull with what I thought might be the last coat of clear epoxy, I discovered millions of little blemishes. I thought it might be outgassing, but Alan said it was probably fisheyes. Either way, the solution was to sand it down and start over, which I'm getting pretty good at (or at least accustomed to) and I figure a boatload of fisheyes is a good omen. I'm anxious to get this thing flipped over, but of course, need to get the bottom completely faired and painted first. The skeg is attached, the chines have been shaped and I'm getting close to primer, etc.. While fairing out the large fillets on the skeg, I discovered a great use for a small scraper that I've had for a long while, but never used much. It really does a nice job cleaning and shaping green epoxy. I plan to roll and tip an epoxy primer and a two-part polyurethane finish, and have a question about high build primers. I've done quite a bit of DIY remodeling/drywall work and have learned one thing for sure...it almost never looks as good as I think it should when the finish coat goes on. With this in mind, I'm planning on quite a bit more fine fairing. Smccormick joked on his thread about using Kilz primer and I've seen other people suggesting the same thing a little more seriously. I'm wondering if it would be okay to work with Kilz2 primer (it's latex, not the PVA wallboard primer) under the epoxy primer to save a few dollars. As smcormick said, most of it ends up on the floor anyway. Good idea, or bad?
  8. AmosSwogger

    Broken Finger Joint Repair?

    There are multiple correct ways to fix this; I would patch the hole now with a replacement wooden finger: 1. Using a file, bevel the edges of the panel where you plan to apply the replacement finger for the purposes of increasing the contact area of the applied finger (in effect creating a minature scarf joint). 2. Bevel the edges of the new finger to roughly match the panel bevels. 3. Clamp a flat board (temporary gluing reference surface) to the underside of the panel. Use tape or plastic so the epoxy won't stick to it in the next step. 4. Epoxy the new finger in place and clamp it to the reference board. 5. When the epoxy dries, sand everything flush (chances are there will be some misalignment).
  9. NowWeTryItMyWay

    Broken Finger Joint Repair?

    In gluing up the long hull panels, just to make things extra challenging, I broke off one of the fingers of the finger joints between the #4 and #5 panels, where the gear teeth are for unfolding it, and then lost the missing piece. I was wondering if anyone has a suggestion for repairing this? I could cut a replacement wooden finger and then epoxy that into place. I have some oak that is the right thickness. Or, I could just fill the whole spot with a sawdust - epoxy mixture. I could also put just a bit of fiberglass on either or both sides to stiffen it up. I'm not too worried about it in the long term (since the outside at least will be glassed.) I'm a little concerned that if the repair is insufficiently strong during the unfolding process, it might knock the patch out when this panel is grinding / flexing against the other panel that it mates to.
  10. hightechmarine

    Ocracoke 256 hull #2 Build

    My friend has an 8 meter sailboat with teak covering boards. We put the Awlwood on 2 years ago. The boat is raced so the covering board have some damage to the finish. We repaired the finish at the end of the season. The teak had not turned yet. We repaired it as you would regular varnish with sanding back and build up layer etc. It repaired wonderfully. I would not waste time on repairing a ding this Awlwood is very hard to remove.
  11. Last week
  12. Paul356

    Taylor and Alan's CS-20 MK3 #15

    Enjoyed the video. I always learn something from watching how you work. Thanks.
  13. OOO

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  14. Thrillsbe

    Building a Two Paw 8 for Trailer Camping

    Well, I’ve managed to sneak in an hour of boatbuilding, here and there. I’ve gotten my gunwales glued on. Today, I transferred her to my boatbuilding horses. I got her all levelled, checked for twist, and did my tack-gluing. In a day or so, I can start taping!
  15. Hirilonde

    Skinning Curlew - Fantail

    weboide, you said you started at the stern? That will make it harder for sure. Work from the combing forward, then the combing aft as Jeff mentions. The fantail will still be fiddly, but much easier.
  16. Paul356

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    Based on earlier comments, I had made both sprits a little longer for my 17, and I am glad to have the extra length for flattening. In fact, I then had to in effect "shorten" the mizzen sprit a bit by adding a little line tag to the clew of the mizzen so the sprit would set further back and not interfere with the main. That is, it was so long it was poking too far in front. Make any sense? But it was much easier to do that than make it too short and have to scarf in something later. Ask me how much longer? Can't remember. If someone needs to know, say the word and I'll run out to the garage and measure.
  17. Kudzu

    Skinning Curlew - Fantail

    Fact is it is not a an easy one to sew. Best method is do the bow first to gain that experience. Sew from the coaming to the stearn. Once you get the fantail you just have to do small stitches and work very methodically. Paying lots of attention to what you are doing. Make sure that you get the fabric even on both sides as you stitch. Once you get to the very back you will be able to pull it a little tighter might pull some wrinkles out. Shrinking will remove some but it is just tricky to sew and patience is your friend.
  18. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    ...and you only have to scarf it on one sprit. Turn the main sprit into the new mizzen, then add enough on the old mizzen to make a new main. I added a section in the middle rather than the end.
  19. Alan Stewart

    Taylor and Alan's CS-20 MK3 #15

    Thanks for all the response! Keeping us motivated and glad to hear keeping others motivated as well. On working with epoxy and cleaning up with acetone. I've tried vinegar in the past and for me it doesn't do the job. For skin contact with epoxy we use denatured alcohol when we have to followed by just a hand washing with soap. We are working in an enclosed garage since it's cold out so we wear 3m organic vapor respirators at all times when working with epoxy. If you smell acetone vapors, you're doing it wrong! And the epoxy vapor coming off a coated surface can be pretty strong too. We're also wearing gloves when working with epoxy so dipping a brush when finished into a jar of acetone to clean it and blotting it into a rag while wearing a respirator and gloves we feel is not a health issue. Getting acetone on our skin is not what we're doing here and should be carefully avoided. For cleaning putty knives we use a chip brush to clean the knife with acetone while holding it over the jar. Knife in one gloved hand, brush in the other. All the acetone falls back into the jar and the brush and knife are cleaned and then wiped onto a rag. It's quick easy clean and minimizes contact with everything. (the rag eventually gets stiff and is tossed). Once the jar of acetone is too dirty it will solidify into a solid and the whole thing is tossed. Jars are plentiful and found in abundance in our recycle bin. We like pickles! Working carefully we rarely get any epoxy on our skin. Not trying to brag and yeah it's impossible not to get covered in sticky when you're laying down big long pieces of cloth or tape but there are ways to avoid it as much as possible like laying everything down dry and then apply the epoxy instead of wetting it out and then trying to move it. And keeping extra gloves in your pocket so if you get it on your glove you can swap it out instead of getting it on the tools you're holding. I treat my gloves like they were my skin which keeps my tools from getting sticky and helps teach clean working habits. Finally, mixing sticks are basically free, cups are cheap and brushes are pretty cheap so if you are REALLY messy I can see how your best bet would just be to toss everything after each batch. I think everyone's got to come up with their own system and this is ours.
  20. Seems I get a second chance for my topic - this time even with pictures. Sometimes I dream about building and sailing a Core Sound 20#3. I love the looks of her, I love the idea of water ballast, I love having a mizzen and this size of cabin and more. But then : I love my existing boat too - and I wonder how the CS would sail in comparison to her. And I wonder how some people can read performance from the lines or pictures or data. So here are the basic informations about my boat: Her name is Muckla and she is a Diabolo, designed by Jüs Segger. A word about Jüs: he was trained as a boat-builder and became later an engeneer and yacht-designer, drawing and selling plans, mainly for plywood hard-chine-boats, aimed for the amateur-builder...... (anyone heared of a similar career??). The Diabolo is 20 ft long, has about 190 sqft of working sail area + lapper and/or spinnaker and/or code 0. She has a ballasted centerboard. The lead in the cb is 60 kgs + about 30 kgs of internal ballast + the heavy equipment in the bilge. This gives her a decent end-stability though I doubt if she would be self-righting if necessary. I rather not try. Initial stability is rather low so you can fine-trim her by moving your body. According to the previous owner she weighs about 600 kgs fully equpped. In about 4 bft on a beam-reach she starts semi-planing with speeds of around 7 kts (hull-speed is just under 6), in a f 5-6 she gets to full-planing. I have read up to 10 kts on the gps so far. So for her size she is quite fast and also well-mannered. Only when reaching in very gusty conditions, she gets a bit catty. So, all you knowledgable folks: if there was a race between a CS20#3 and a Diabolo - which one would be in front under which conditions - and: how do you know?? I hope, the data + pics give enough information. Looking forward very much to your thoughts & feelings, Tobias
  21. Designer

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    Steve, I think that I figured out why the enlarged view gave the 4" measurement. The enlarged view was scaled by 2 and the dynamic dimensioning turned the 2" into 4". We have had some issues with sprits being too short. We have been adding hardware along the way to make rigging quicker and each link we add requires a few inches more sprit. Because the sprit slopes down aft at about 30 degrees, if the snotter is higher on the mast or the sail is not hoisted to the top, it makes the sprit angle down more which requires a longer sprit. I think that we had lengthened the sprits by the time that plan sheet was drawn. I would finish rigging the sprits as you have them and go sailing. If you cannot flatten the sails enough, I would just scarf some wood on the aft end.
  22. Steve W

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    Amos, I remember you telling me when we were down there. I made mine an inch longer. Having the ability to flatten the sails in higher winds is the first step to de-powering. If you can't move your hardware further out, I't make a new main sprit and cut your mizzen from your old main sprit. Of all the things to make again, this wouldn't be the worst.
  23. Greetings! I'm working on a Curlew, and I've started skinning the stern, and I can't for the life of me figure out how to get the skin smooth coming up over the fantail. No matter where and how much I pull, I always wind up with it trying to pucker or fold. I'm using the new 9 oz polyester. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!
  24. Pete McCrary

    Taylor and Alan's CS-20 MK3 #15

    The changes Alan and Taylor (and B & B's design) have incorporated into their #15 CS20.3 are really great improvements -- design and fabrication. Especially the tank assembly, icebox, battery stowage & step, motor well, and cabin roof beams & the assembly of the cabin roof structure. And the mizzen tabernacle! For my Chessie stepping the mizzen is a challenge -- but so far manageable. But at 85 I'm not sure how many more years I'll be able to do it solo. Ditto for raising/lowering the mainmast. The icebox makes the best use of that starboard-side space. Question: Will the lining have an outboard drain so you could use block ice? In the same port-side space I've found that the box drawers work very well -- especially for stowage of galley type things: stove, wash basin, cooking fuel, towels, spare blankets, etc. The drawer is easily removed for access -- but keep it light weight. But the rails have to be installed before the sheer strakes, cockpit deck, & sheer cabin roof panels are installed. Almost impossible [to do] afterwards. I use the space--under for spare-water bladders (doubles as more ballest down low). The surface over the battery box is useful for a galley stove or wash basin. Just forward of the step (over the battery) is the only place (in the cabin) with unlimited head-room. If the hatch (on Chessie) opened just a little more -- it would make standing [at that spot on the cabin sole] a little more comfortable for washing, shaving, etc (using the garage top as a counter top). Also for reefing the mains'l, scanning the horizon, etc. If you spring for a dodger, be sure to have the canvas guy provide for a zippered opening in the panel over the companionway. My guy didn't want to do it -- saying it might not be water-tight. But I insisted, and he has agreed that it was a good idea. Very little leakage -- and what-of-it, if the hatch is easily closed. I really like the motor well. It puts the OBM out of the way and there is still lots of stowage in the other cockpit lockers -- as well as under the mizzen partner for fuel & water bottles. But I'd do it just for a better looking boat. Just hate that ugly look at the stern. I would try to mount the motor (now an IBM?) on a faux transom that can be raised/lowered on a track. On my Whitholz 17' Catboat (built by Cape Cod Shipbuilding) the OBM was mounted on a faux transom outboard of the actual transom. Raising and lowering was done with 1/4" line and x4 tackle. No reaching way overboard to tilt heavy motor out on the water. I really enjoyed the video. On another posting I'll bring up issues that you might want to address with respect to trailering.
  25. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mk. 3 #22 - Essex Fells, NJ

    Nice progess.
  26. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    Steve, my sprits aren't quite long enough to flatten the sails. I would reccomend making yours longer than the plans call for.
  27. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    I second the appreciation for the packaging and labeling of the lines. When I started rigging I didn't know the difference between a bed sheet and a mizzen sheet, without the organized kit I don't think I would have succeeded.
  28. Kennneee

    Taylor and Alan's CS-20 MK3 #15

    The used vinegar makes a great salad dressing.
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