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  3. Leo De Bruyn

    Short Shot vs. Reef - Durability Test

    You know, I did do some rounding on it, but since I am light on tools for that sort of thing it could probably have been a lot rounder. For future projects some kind of router with roundover bit and a grinder would save time and compensate for my lack of patience and lack of free time for endless sanding and filing to get a much rounder effect overall. It turns out to be pretty important. Incidentally it seems like a more v bottom shape like Ravenswood would be a bit less vulnerable to this kind of damage. There's just less hard edges available for things to rub on below. On the other hand, I appreciated how stable the rounded bottom felt when I ran aground. There was no question of me tipping over.
  4. Hirilonde

    Short Shot vs. Reef - Durability Test

    It is a must do for me on all boat projects that every exposed corner in/on a boat be softened if not rounded over.
  5. Kudzu

    Short Shot vs. Reef - Durability Test

    No surprise. It takes a lot put a hole in one. I am guessing by what you said that you did not round the ends of the seat stringers? An exposed blunt end is more susceptible to damage than anywhere else. I need to add a note on the plans and clarify that. I thought there was something in the manual but I am learning most people do not read the manual very closely. So it is better to put it on the plans.
  6. Last week
  7. Jknight611

    dutch OB 20

    Nice........very nice! i have clamp envy! Might have to retract my statement โ€œcanโ€™t have too many clamps!โ€
  8. dutch ob 20

    dutch OB 20

    And now the other side
  9. dutch ob 20

    dutch OB 20

    Years of investing๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜
  10. Chick Ludwig

    Old Codger's Keowee Misadventure

    Just thought I'd let y'all know. Old Codger is repaired and ready for his next adventure. Of course it's cold and raining. Today. Yesterday. Tomorrow. EVERY day! Ain't summer EVER gonna get here? Seems like it'll be nine more months until it's decent enough to go boating again. Yeah, I know. I exaggerate a bit. But it WILL be a long time. BUT, if we DO get a warm, dry day, I'll try to convince the Codger to get his bottom wet. He's very contrite and promises to not take it upon himself to get into any more fights with a dock! Meanwhile, how 'bout y'all? Hasn't ANY of you had an adventure you could tell us about to help us get through the long, cold winter?
  11. Chick Ludwig

    dutch OB 20

    Your family must own a clamp factory! Family VonClamp?
  12. labrat

    Short Shot vs. Reef - Durability Test

    Glad to hear it turned out OK Leo - I was a bit worried by the thread title. What you found ties in with the recognized tendency for the bow and stern to wear through first from repeated grounding on the frame. They are still quite durable boats though. I've scraped my Curlew across submerged logs and the odd rock in skinny backwaters but nothing like what you find on marine reefs. I don't recall even being able to see any evidence of the scrapes on mine.
  13. dutch ob 20

    dutch OB 20

    A carpenter with too many clamps does not exist
  14. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    YAY!!! Hope ya don't need the Sawzall! I heard of a guy once who actually built a boat in his living room and had to cut a hole in his wall to get it out.
  15. On my fourth trip out in the new kayak, I was out at sunset. I had carefully considered the currents, tides, and prevailing winds and selected my put in spot accordingly. It was beautiful and the boat performed well. I spent a little while messing around some waves and getting a feel for how the boat handled them at various angles. Eventually, I headed down the shore, doing some exploring as the sun went down. I know the area well from hiking on the shore, but lighting conditions made it hard to see down into the water ahead of me, and I became a little nervous. I was just about to call it a night, when I passed between some rocks and the nearby shore and I suddenly felt a vibration and heard a prolonged sound kind of like the zipper on a tent, or someone running a fingernail along taught fabric. In that first panicked moment, the sound seemed to last for years until finally I came to a stop-- lodged in place. Looking down, I could now clearly see that there was a large reef connecting the above-water rocks to the shore, and the calm water and lighting conditions had prevented me from seeing that the water was only a few inches deep. I could also see all kinds of barnacles, musssels, and other terrifyingly sharp things under me. I took a few deep breaths, wondering if I would start to feel water seeping in around me. It seemed fine. I wasn't really in any serious danger. I knew that it was shallow enough to just pick the boat up and carry it to shore but I didn't fancy trying to walk on that terrain barefoot as the light was failing. Eventually I started feeling around with the paddle and managed to get myself off the reef -- wincing at each little bump and scrape-- and find my way out of there. In open water, I opened the spray skirt, and also reached into the water, to try to feel on the bottom. It all seemed fine, and so I paddled themile and a half back to my starting point. It was too dark by then to properly inspect the boat, but I confirmed that there were no holes in it. At home, I cleaned the boat up and inspected the damage. It's a little hard to see with the white paint job, but worth taking a look at. I learned something from what I saw. In this picture, you can see that the marks run several feet along the boat, on the keel and both lower stringers. With that much of the boat dragged over the reef, if the fabric had cut open, it would have been pretty catastrophic-- duct tape wouldn't have saved me. Basically, what people who haven't used skin boats imagine will happen at first sign of collision with anything. You can see that there are long sections where the paint is just scuffed a bit. Here you can see up close the worst spots where the outer layer of paint has been scraped off completely. The worst spot is at the end of one of the seat/floor boards (which, you may all recall are made from strips of cedar on this boat-- not pieces of ply). My overall impression is that the durability profile of the boat is perhaps not what you would expect on first consideration. Obviously, when it comes to puncture from a collision with a pointy spear-like object, the wood parts are stronger than the fabric parts. But, when it comes to running over sharp things such as reefs covered with barnacles and shellfish, which is much more likely in a marine environment, as far as the skin is concerned, those big soft open panels of fabric are the most durable part of the boat because they just flex out of the way when something runs across them. I can see where the marks just kind of run off the stringers and then disappear as they get out into the panel. On the other hand a stringer will prevent the fabric from getting out of the way, effectively grinding it across the cutting surface. Even so, the fabric (which is a loose-weave 8 oz I got from Dyson) doesn't seem to have any severed threads-- it's just roughed up in places and a lot of paint removed. Pointy bits, like corner on the end of the floor/seat stringers are the most dangerous spots. That's where the worst damage, that most approaches the appearance of a "hole" was found. In the previous picture, that corner is where that large gash is. The rest of the mark kind of fades out into the panel to the right, beyond the end of the floor board. Besides learning something about safety and preparedness (and to spend a bit more time with the charts, and stay further from shore in bad light conditions), I also learned that on future boats it will be a good idea to do a more thorough rounding of the outer edges of the stringers to reduce the sharpness of the corners even more and put less area of wood against the fabric. Special attention should be given to the seat boards, on the edges and corners that face downward. Overall, I was lucky and learned some useful lessons at what I consider to be a low cost. My repairs at least will be cheap and easy-- it's just white Rustoleum. And it was a beautiful evening. Here's a picture after I landed, with the lights of Lopez Village across the bay.
  16. Steve W

    Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

    Shes coming out Saturday morning. .... it's all lined up. She's painted (pics soon) and a new basement door is waiting to be put in. Sawzall and Vaseline might be required!
  17. dutch ob 20

    dutch OB 20

    The diagonal stringers
  18. keen2buildagain

    Aussie Open OB-20 #26

    Hi Guys, Thought you all maybe interested in my version of a fold down shade canopy for the timber tub... the front and back stays, once unlocked via hinged tube fittings, fold up and then after the nut on the rear of the gunnel plates are undone, the whole thing pivots forward to rest on the bow plate. A bit confusing at first, but the only way it will fit in my shed. it looks a tad tall but with the low sides of the OB-20 and the fact that I am 6'-9"........ ๐Ÿคฅ I have no say in the matter! Stay safe Trev
  19. Peter Batchelor

    Core Sound 17 Mk 1 for sale in Melbourne, Australia

    So many good designs, so little time ๐Ÿ™‚
  20. Hirilonde

    Core Sound 17 Mk 1 for sale in Melbourne, Australia

    Decisions, decisions, decisions, I don't know we deal with it.
  21. smccormick

    dutch OB 20

    Nice progress.
  22. I am building a SHAD for a client. I have been wanting to video a build from start to finish but haven't had a Commision in s while and the last thing I need is another kayak! So I jumped on this and ordered a inexpensive video camera and I going to document the whole thing from start to the day I launch it. Maybe even when we turn it over to the client? I will update this thread as I add new Episodes. PART 2 PART 3 PART 4 BONUS VIDEO Part 5 Part 6 PART 7
  23. dutch ob 20

    dutch OB 20

    The chine batten glued in the trusses
  24. Earlier
  25. Peter Batchelor

    Core Sound 17 Mk 1 for sale in Melbourne, Australia

    Our boat's been sold. Now to start thinking about the next one ๐Ÿ˜‰ Peter
  26. ricknriver

    Speeding up rigging and unrigging.

    Thanks Graham, I was just padding the crutch Alan built for my CS15, but I like yours with slots for the sprits and ability to keep them attached. Will send email for the .pdf. Rick
  27. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 20 Mk. 3 #22 - Essex Fells, NJ

    I used inner and outer rings for Old Codger. The outer ring was epoxied on, the clear portlight set in with caulk, and the inner ring bedded in caulk with screws holding them in place. The screws get almost 1/2 inch "bite through the cabin side and outer ring. I think this is plenty adequate for drop boards.
  28. Capt Bones

    Core Sound 20 Mk. 3 #22 - Essex Fells, NJ

    I did it the way you are thinking and being pretty simple myself I used very short screws on the retainer ring.
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