Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Steve W

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Amos and your awesome family.....congratulations. It's great to see a project through like that. Your pictures and video are an inspiration. My wife like the stability. And your son must be darn proud!
  3. Jknight611

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Congratulations Amos! Beautiful boat! Hope to see you and your boat at the Messabout! We planned to arrive early an sail the area but Florence beat us! We’ll will just play it as it goes
  4. Joe Anderson

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Somehow your dream of building a boat became your family's dream. Your success has become your family's success. As I watch that video I can hardly imagine how your son feels or his Mom. You have done very well in so many ways.
  5. Chick Ludwig

    Chick's Micro Power Cruiser Project.

    Gosh, thanks Don!
  6. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Awesome!!!!!
  7. Last week
  8. Pete McCrary

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Amos, you and your family have created a mighty fine boat that will be treasured as a family heirloom over the years. Good lessons to learn and great memories.
  9. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Lara, myself, and our 5 year old had a good sail on the Pasquotank River recently. We launched at the park in downtown Elizabeth City. We beat up wind for about 3 hours. I'm guessing the wind was about 15-20 mph. This was good experience for Lara and I, as this was our first time sailing upwind in wind this strong. We didn't reef, but we did have the ballast tank full. The boat handled great and we learned to trust it. Lara was braver than me; she pushed the boat harder and healed it over more. We sailed past the blimp factory. This blimp hanger was built during WWII to support anti-submarine patrols. It is still in use today (pictures stolen from the internet). We anchored, went for a swim and had lunch. We had a long run back to the boat ramp and my 5 year old got to "steer". I posted a short YouTube video of his first time sailing the boat:
  10. Randy Jones

    Seattle CS17 Mk3 Launch

    Oh boy. talk about opening a can of worms. Hull speed in knots is 1.34 x the square root of water line length in feet. For a 16'-10" CS17 M1 that works out to 5.5 knots. I believe that means you start climbing the bow wave and begin partial planning above 5.5 knots but don't reach a full plane until some higher speed. My CS17 experience is the boat feels "lighter" at about 7 knots and above 8 were certainly planning and anything faster is just crazy fun.
  11. Thanks. This is the type of answer I love. Not just yes or no but a clear and concise explanation so that I can make the informed decision based on my needs. Thank you again.
  12. Paul356

    Seattle CS17 Mk3 Launch

    I don't think 7 is planing, just real fast. When you plane, it should be obvious; you're up on the bow wave and really tracking, feels like a motorboat, little hull resistance. You're going 7 and then all of a sudden you kick into overdrive and you're going 9 (on a standard CS 17, anyway). Usually planing happens on a broad reach, or at least that's the easiest direction to get up on a plane. I say all this not quite sure how a MkIII handles a plane given the water ballast feature.
  13. AmosSwogger

    Seattle CS17 Mk3 Launch

    I saw 7 knots on a broad reach yesterday (using a Navionics app on my cell phone). I don't think the boat was planing, but I'm not sure. Here goes a dumb question: is it obvious when the boat planes, or is it subtle and something only an expericenced sailor would notice?
  14. Generally speaking, quartersawn lumber is prefered because it is more stable (and it looks better if finished clear since the medullary rays are visible). It does not expand and contract as much as as flatsawn lumber. The reason for this is that quartersawn lumber wants to expand and contract along its thickness, while flatsawn lumber wants to expands and contracts along its width. As a result, quartersawn lumber moves less, and is therefore less prone to cupping and cracking if its moisture content changes. The wider the wood, the more advantageous it is to use quartersawn. Since stringers are not wide, and they will be coated with expoxy and paint, these wood movement issues that make quartersawn lumber more desireable are not applicable here in my opinion. I would just make sure they are knot free. I would try to select quartersawn or riftsawn for wider pieces however (the tabnernacle for example). EDIT: as I recall, I did make sure my port and starboard hull panel stringer grain orientation matched in hopes that they would bend equally as the hull was unfolded. I also made sure that when scarfing stringers togethers I matched the grain orientation (I didn't glue a quartersawn piece to a flatsawn piece). I'm not sure if any of this really matters that much.
  15. Thrillsbe

    Chick's Micro Power Cruiser Project.

    Yesterday, my friend Don Rausch and I drove “up the mountain” to Chick’s shop. The purpose of the trip was to inspect Chick’s new creation. I am happy to report that he did a superb job of adapting one of B&B’s open skiffs into a cute little gunkholer. I always love oggling his work; his skill level is second to none. (No surprise there.) Not soon after we started sharing corny jokes with each other, his cabin cushions arrived. They really made the cabin look cozy. He still has a few details to tend to, but he’s on track for bringing her to the Messabout. You’re gonna love this little gem!
  16. Mojo619

    New fabric on sale!

    Those are really great prices. I do hope you still have this avail when my daughter and I are done with our build.
  17. I've started to cut out the parts for my Core Sound Mark III build. Already it's been a learning experience. I had cut out 1 shear strake and was using it as a template to cut the second shear strake. I did not realize how flexible Okume is. I had clamped the 2 pieces together with 4 clamps and proceeded to cut with my router. The rotation of the cutting bit caused the piece being cut to pull out from under the template causing it to be miss cut. I will add plywood using tape and epoxy and recut. Fortunately, this is along the joint lines and will be covered up by the joint treatment. This time though, I will use double sided tape to hold the pieces together. I'm using Fir for the stringers. Does anyone know if I should be using quarter sawn lumber or does it matter since it will be sheathed in fiberglass? Once I get all the pieces cut, I will start posting my progress. Unfortunately this will take a while as I'm a long haul truck driver. It's a long time between home/boat builing times.
  18. Kudzu

    New fabric on sale!

    Just received a roll of a new 9 oz polyester fabric. This is tight weave fabric with a fairly smooth finish. The weave it fairly smooth and nice and tight. Sewing this fabric should be easy to without the pull holes you would get with the original 8 oz we sold for so many years. I applied some paint and it soaked in rather than just sitting on the surface. $5 a foot but I have it on sale for a few days at $4.50 a foot.
  19. Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and new to building boats! For now, I'm thinking of building the Short-Shot. I'm not an experience kayaker, I just like building and the idea of some fun physical activity. Ill probably use it very little on the Oregon coast and mostly in the deeper parts of the willamette river and maybe some mountain lakes. I'm looking to see if there are any Kudzu Craft builders in the Oregon area that can pass on supplies. Particularly, I'm looking to see if someone has built a strong back that may be just lying around after their project. I foresee building one boat and I also foresee the strong back sitting in my garage, taking up space after that. If anyone else is in the same boat, haha, let me know. I would also be interested in leftover wood. If anyone has scraps of marine plywood in the Oregon or Washington area, I can come pick them up. And lastly, It would be nice to have someone locally who has done this project in the past, that I can bounce ideas off of. Ill use this forum but its nice to meet people too. Thanks for reading my post. Keep it upright! Ryan
  20. Designer

    B&B Preps for Florence

    I talked to Tom on the phone the other day. They went inland for the storm. He was heading home and the most pressing issue on his mind was cleaning out rotting food from the fridge. His house is high and well built but his shop goes under water. He has a scheme that lifts all of his machines above flood water but I am sure that like us, there will be a layer of mud and lots of flotsum to clean up and there always seems to some stuff that is missed during preparation. How did you fare Oyster?
  21. Scott Dunsworth

    B&B Preps for Florence

    I also was thinking of Tom, I stayed at his dock on the creek once. Don't remember the lay of the land for sure, but ten feet of surge wouldn't be good.
  22. Kudzu

    Short Shot FROG

    Looks good from here!!
  23. Steve W

    oil and epoxy

    FWIW.......I laid some cat litter in a similar problem I had. It got most of the oil out, leaving a slight discoloration left. I then sanded to get most of the discoloration out. The glass stuck to it just fine.
  24. Oyster

    B&B Preps for Florence

    Has anyone heard from Tom lathrop?
  25. Alan Stewart

    oil and epoxy

    I think my approach would be to scrub the area with soap and water maybe even 80 grit sandpaper with soap and water then let dry thouroughly and I think it should be fine.
  26. Nick C

    oil and epoxy

    I am building a CS20 and it is going well – at least until the approach of hurricane Florence. I hope this isn’t a major problem or there is a remedy: there is a spot of oil on okoume that will be fiberglassed. During the prep for the hurricane I got a drop of what appears to be oil on the exterior of the hull. It is long past the time that it will blot up and I am concerned that epoxy will not bond to that spot. Any advice or relating similar experience will be appreciated. I am close to unfolding the boat and don’t want to create a pre-blistered hull!
  27. Leo De Bruyn

    Short Shot FROG

    Here is the Short Shot I am building out in Friday Harbor, WA. It has taken a while. When I started, I had no woodworking tools at all and almost no experience. Now, I have the beginnings of a respectable collection. Acquiring tools and learning to use them has obviously added to my cost and time, but learning to do this stuff is a major reason I decided to do this in the first place, so I am content. Here on the island, what I could get my hands on was MDO for the frames (ugly, but seems to work fine), and Western Red Cedar for stringers. I was lucky enough to find some full length clear fascia boards for the gunwales and keel, and there are only a couple scarfs I had to do for a couple of the stringers. If I had wanted I could have ordered clear finished 1"x8"x18' boards at the local yard, but I didn't want to spend the money, so I picked through the fascia pile and hit the jackpot. Good cedar is one of the few things that it is easy to get out here. The boat is a little more heavily built than plans-- initially because I didn't have an easy way to plane the boards from 3/4" to 5/8", but after some thought, I realized I don't mind it being a bit sturdier in the sometimes rough conditions I can encounter on the ocean. I will only be using it in salt water, and we can get some decent wind, waves, and tides here. It's still not too heavy for me to easily pick up and put on the car. I also did my first ever lamination on the deck beam, which is far from perfect but seems very strong. Having climbed into it, I concur that the laminated beam is the way to go. I will try to improve on my technique for the coaming. All they had was red oak, at 3/4" thickness, so I had to rip it into 1" and 1.5" pieces, put those on their side and push through the saw with featherboards to hold them straight to get three roughly 1/8" strips per piece. The stuff is not cheap, either. In case you are wondering, I will be skinning the frame as-is-- bare wood with no finish applied.
  1. Load more activity

Hate ads?
Love messing-about?

Become a Supporting Member - $12 for the next year - and we'll remove the ads for you. Pay by PayPal or credit card.

Give $12 to Support Us




×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.