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  1. Today
  2. Drew

    JP's OB20

    JP, you just have too many boats man, as my wife would tell me. She even made me sell our sea kayak. I guess some just don't get it
  3. Designer

    AWL

    Amos, The Gulf Stream crossing was very easy. We sat at Bimini for a few days waiting for a norther to pass. By lunch time on the day before we expected to cross, the forecast said the wind had shifted east and the swell was dropping so we were underway by 1:00 pm. It turned out fine and we were anchored up in West Palm Beach before dark. Of course we were running at 10 knots and the stream gave us another 3 knots. We can cruise at an easy 15 knots but 10 suited the conditions. You cover a lot of ground at 13 knots. I pushed for turning up the axis of the stream and be home in a couple of days but the owner nixed it. In retrospect I enjoyed the trip up the waterway. Watches meant pushing the left or right buttons on the auto pilot every couple of minutes and watch the world go by. I never saw any conditions that Carlita could not handle easily. We just need a good weather window to make up for our lower speed.
  4. AmosSwogger

    AWL

    Great pictures. How was the Gulf Stream crossing?
  5. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    I am going to take your advice and just do the transom; it is the most noticeable. Although after I level the surface I may just re-paint the transom instead of polishing. For future builders, one quart of Awlgrip paint (along with the associated catalyst and thinner) was enough to put on three coats if you are painting between the waterline and the rub rail. Alan told me one quart would do it and he was right. I even have a little left over.
  6. Yesterday
  7. Sags and runs can be buffed out, which is a pro painter's secret weapon, it can be fixed. You do have to wait until it's good and dry (depending on the paint type, up to a month), than locally knock it down with some 400 or maybe a scraper, depending on how bad the run is. Work up through 600, 800 then onto a cutting compound, followed by a polish. Of course, this area will look a lot better than surrounding areas (baby's ass smooth), so you may have to polish the whole boat, which isn't a bad thing either. In the end, you may end up with a boat that is the envy of all that see it, all because of fixing a screw up or two. I've had the exact same problem, though I usually just buff up just the offending panel or side, hoping no one will notice the other panels or side.
  8. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Yours can only look better. The paint sagged and dripped on me; it wasn't drying fast enough. It was 60 degrees (and the temp was falling), and I thinned the paint too much. If I had to do it over again I would wait for a warmer day.
  9. Designer

    AWL

    Chick, It seems like you know me too well.
  10. Steve W

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    That looks awesome. I can only hope my boat can look that great.
  11. Steve W

    AWL

    Totally Jealous! That looks fun.
  12. JPower210

    JP's OB20

    I figured a bit of an update was in order- I started my build quite a while ago, but competing projects have taken priority- full refit of a Westsail 32, etc... But I am back at it. I have spent the last couple of weeks spending quality time with the long board. Or as the case may be, the sorta long board with the flare of the OB's topsides at the bow. I think I have hit the end though. Plan is to spray primer later this week, block sand it, and then spray finish coats by this coming weekend. Most of my time is in the evenings, after the little ones are in bed, so I don't get long blocks of time to work. If all goes to plan, I'll let the paint cure next week while we are out of town and flip her when I get back. It's nice, (with the exception of longboard sanding) to take a break from the repair/refit on the Westsail and work with new construction.
  13. Chick Ludwig

    AWL

    Graham, are ya planning to design, build, and race one of these next year? I know you want to!
  14. TimE

    Ocracoke 256 #3

    Ok thanks - helps me with my dimensions. Tim
  15. Designer

    AWL

    I have been absent without leave for about three weeks leaving Alan to fend for himself. He appears to have done such a good job I might have to sail more. The owner of the big power cat that we built, called me and asked if I would like to help him bring her back home from the Exumas. It too several nanoseconds to say yes. His intended crew had injured himself and had to return home. I was able to delay my departure to see the first two days of the Family Island Regatta at Georgetown. It is the biggest sporting event in the Bahamas. The Prime Minister and Governor General among other notable dignitaries attend the awards ceremony. I never did find out what the design rules were but the theme was to install the tallest mast that they could get away with and if you want more sail area just make the boom longer and add foot round until it drags in the water. I understand that they now have to return with all of the crew that they left with but they appear to adjust the number of crew for each race to the expected wind strength. The fleets were big and I think that there were four classes. I do not think that #5 would pass the Coast Guard level flotation rules. I was pleased to see that the Osprey's were doing well. There were not that many in Florida or Georgia but the Carolinas had lots of nests with chicks looking like they were almost ready to fledge.
  16. Last week
  17. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    Beautiful job!!!!!!! We're all proud of you.
  18. Wow! To say that I am impressed would be an understatement. Beautiful job. Your eye for detail is a credit to you. There is a NIS 23 in my club that has the same color scheme and it looks great. The owner calls her "Rosie Red".
  19. Paul356

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    That looks terrific, Amos. Very handsome!
  20. AmosSwogger

    Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

    I need to catch up on pictures; here goes: Masking off the waterline. Rolling and tipping the Awlgrip. Topside painted with Devthane 379. Suspended: Successful landing. Installed the keel rollers.
  21. Steve W

    Core Sound 17 Outboard well (short shaft)

    Awesome work. Brings back memories of trying to work this out on my CS20.3. The geometry gets pretty tricky on the reverse angle transom.
  22. Alan Stewart

    Core Sound 17 Outboard well (short shaft)

    The box is in. I pulled it off the mold this morning, scraped all the gluing surfaces, buttered it up and squished it in place. If the prop ends up a bit too high, I might be able to cut her down a little but the motor body was the limiting factor when the motor swings through 180 degrees.
  23. Beacher

    Core Sound 17 Outboard well (short shaft)

    My experience with my CS 20 is that the notch has to be cut deeper into the transom than the shaft length would indicate. The transom lifts in swells and waves and brings the prop up. In flat water it's ok, otherwise I have to keep the boat stern heavy. I don't want a bracket but I may end up doing that.
  24. Chick Ludwig

    Core Sound 17 Outboard well (short shaft)

    The well that I built in Summer Breeze only had one problem. I couldn't tilt the motor up enough for the tilt lock (or whatever it's called) to engage. The powerhead hit the deck before the motor was tilted far enough. I had to make a block to stick between the tower housing and transom clamp to hold it in a tilted position.
  25. Dnjost

    Core Sound 17 Outboard well (short shaft)

    Excellent work. This is very similar to the set up that i did onmy cs17. The only issue that i encountered was with the mizzen sheet hanging up on the motor cowl.a ring on a bungie cord helps pull the sheet forward when tacking.
  26. Today I started on an outboard well for our Core Sound 17 'Southbound'. We recently purchased a Tohatsu 3.5 4-stroke short shaft motor from online outboards. The plan is to use the new motor on our currently under construction CS-20mk3 since it was deemed the best fit. That means the 17 needs a bracket or a well and I didn't want to buy or make a bracket particularly. We previously used a long shaft 2 stroke honda 2.5 but that motor went with a new owner of our Core Sound 20 Dawn Patrol. The long shaft bolted to a bracket whos edge sat above the top of the transom. The new motor must be in a well to reach the water since it's 5" shorter. I've been breaking in the new motor in a trash can in the evenings and have now 2.5 hrs of time on it below 3000rpm and it purrs like a kitten compared to the old 2-stroke honda. Here is a link to all the pictures I took today of cutting a fitting the outboard well. https://photos.app.goo.gl/dnbRVtpFxNTxV5o16 And here are some select shots.... I started with a "minimal" 6" wide 6" deep cutout centered on the old outboard position 13 1/2" off the center-line. I chose 15 1/2" above the lower edge of the transom at that point for the height of the cutout and that turned out to be spot on. Not too low that the controls hit the deck and not too high that the lower unit hits the bottom of the boat. It will remain to be seen if the prop is low enough in the water but I'm prepared to live with it. The motor didn't quite fit width wise so the hole was widened 1" inboard. That got her in the hole but the body of the motor hit the corners of the cutout when it was rotated. So the next iteration aimed to widen the hole to correct that. The motor would now rotate in one direction but from the other "preferred" direction the tiller bonked on the inside corner (see below) . So one more iteration was needed. The final cutout was ~12 3/4" wide at the top edge of the transom starting 8" inboard from the sheer. And 11" "deep" fore and aft. Now satisfied with the size of the cutout I installed a beam across the cutout 1" thick and notched it for an existing stiffener. Then I screwed a bottom in up against the lower face of the beam and proceeded to install cardboard hot glue templates for the sides and front panels. The cardboard templates were replaced with the real McCoy (1/4" okume) . The sides and front were marked on the bottom and then the bottom was cut to final shape. Next all was removed and assembled with 3-4 dabs of hot glue to join the parts together. The hot glue assembly was strong enough to round over the exterior edges and sand it all smooth. This assembly was checked for fit back in the boat. Finally (for today) the assembly was taken into the shop the interior edges were filleted and then it was flipped over and glassed. After the glass was cured enough the edges were trimmed and the box placed on a cutting board with plastic to create a mold surface. Then 2 layers of glass were applied onto the mold surface to create flanges that will bond the top edges of the box up against the underside of the fore deck tomorrow. The beam and box assembly will all be installed together and then the deck cutout edges will be rounded over and the inside of the box glassed to the boat and deck.
  27. Chick Ludwig

    Action Tiger builds sailboat. With epoxy!

    Oh man of many talents. I'm impressed! I cant't even seem to get much of ANYTHING done these days.
  28. Hirilonde

    Trailer for Core Sound Mark 3 boats.

    My trailer for my 15'-8" Lapwing is marketed as a 12-14 foot boat with motor trailer. It balances at 10% tongue weight and the keel is supported on rollers to about 3.5 feet from transom. My only regret is not getting a wider wheelbase/lower slung trailer. With more of you building the Mk3 you should be able to identify a couple good models to work with.
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