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  1. Ravenswood—low volume and standard. The LV has been varnished with poly urethane and is ready to be covered. With the frames cut and stringers made, the second on went together quickly—three days from frames in the jig to FROG. It’s startling how fast they come together when everything is prepped. Laminating and then sanding and finishing the coaming is the slowest part. Takeaway from the coaming is to use very thin, straight-grained stock. I used African mahogany (wood store had a nice piece of 8/4) but next time I’d use maple or oak as Jeff recommends. Also cut it very thin. The book said 3/16ths, I went with 1/8, but next time I go for 3/32s. 1/8 was as thin as I could get on my table saw but if you have access to a band saw set up for re-sawing go thinner. The mahogany looks great but the grain was a little squirrelly. I don’t think it was worth the extra effort. Looking forward to getting them launched now! Hal
    3 points
  2. We finally finished lashing my wife’s Ravenswood LV. It’s astonishingly light at 18 lbs minus coaming. Next up, assembling my Ravenswood Standard. Frames and stringers are done so we’re hoping it will go together more quickly.
    3 points
  3. Thanks but all are not back safe yet!!! Still some sailors on the course! Kevin (KDubs) and his daughter (Maggers) are closing in on the finish right now in their Core Sound 17 #398! They are doing great. https://watertribe.com/Events/ChallengeGMapper.aspx Here's a video i took from our first day sailing.
    3 points
  4. I haven't posted in awhile, but I just watched Alan's video on Youtube. That was really neat. Maybe I should do one like that for Skeena. Here are my comments. · The Continental is a good choice for these boats. I have my bunks narrowed to support the longitudinal stringers. Replaced the bunk boards with 6” wide ones and the centerboard rests on the left one. That works good and keeps things simple. · Those starboard rub rails are sweet, but I just used teak and it’s held up well. I did not use SS hollow back. They do need to be touched up once in awhile. · What is the manufacturer and PN of the plug used for the mast lights through the bulkhead? · The anchor roller mount is clever. · Only having two downhauls is why I changed my hatch to sliding. Going on the deck solo is a bad idea. · I’m a knucklehead. When I added the mizzen tabernacle, I never adopted the bridle line setup of the main. I followed the plans for the rotating masts. I need to fix! · I like the shackles instead of lashing. It may be I’m just a bad lasher. · The 20 seems so huge compared to the 17. · I ordered “anti-re-cleat-ers” and have them on every cleat. Buy spares as they are hard to come by and they can catch on stuff and get ruined. · I like those forward shelves. · Not having opening ports has not been an issue. · The sweat on the back of Alan’s hands reminds me of how much I dislike hot and muggy. Bless you southerners. · Moving the CB trunk forward is something I want to avoid for now. I have completely neutral to lee helm though, so I need to tackle this at some point. The only time it Is bad is when I have both sails reefed twice. · I like the idea of the electric outboard and two batteries. I use a wheelchair battery I have in the front locker and a 50-watt solar panel for everything else. It hasn’t let me down and is usually fully charged mid-morning. · I go back and forth on whether I should have installed a cooler. The space below is nice. · I like the downhaul on the centerboard. I just finished the masthead float but the extra length of the post hits my vehicle, so I’m weighing my options. I’d hate to have to unscrew the mast at the tabernacle. I got an idea I’m working on. · As soon as I get it on I’ll test it on Skeena. · A four-part mainsheet seems excessive even on a 20. I do agree the mizzen could use a bit of extra purchase. · I like the S hook on the aft end of the main sprit. · I think I’m going to adopt Richard’s reefing setup. · I put my mizzen snotter cleat on the front of the mizzen tabernacle. It’s easy to adjust from both sides, but I might not need as much adjustment if I had the bridle rigged right (duh!) · The bands used for ponytails around the sprits work good instead of fairleads and give you a place to bundle the reefing line during transit. · On the 20 there is enough room between the hatches to put a stationary solar panel. · I never put on the dodger coaming. It was designed after I started Skeena. · I used a Yeti style cockpit rubber latch as I was afraid I’d catch my heals on those metal ones in the video. I’d like a report as mine aren’t lockable. · Yes, a pivoting tiller allows me to put the tiller on the bunk when I’m traveling on long trips. · I like that bungy rudder downhaul setup, but it looks pretty Rube Goldberg-ish. My uptight German genes are slightly offended. · I went a different direction on the ladder as I felt like that type of ladder would catch the sheets. Am I wrong? · The idea of putting a cleat on the cabin top for a spring-line is appealing. · Mizzen sheet holding the masts down…..genius. · Those light masts are really a joy. · The mizzen cleat should rotate. When I capsized, I just couldn’t release the mizzen without leaning forward to try and release. That put my weight in and contributed. · My mizzen sheet loads are high for all the reasons in your race follow up. · Rowing isn’t something I plan to do much, but a standup paddleboard paddle is amazing. You can bump the tiller over a bit and paddle from one side facing forward and get a lot of power for short bursts.
    2 points
  5. Working on Ravenswood Standard frame now after finishing my wife’s LV. Once you have the frames prepped and stringers scarfed, it goes pretty quick. The most frustrating part was finding decent, knot-free cedar. Typically my stringers ended up with 2-3 scarfs and I often had to cut them apart and reglue because of hard spots, or small kinks. If the stringers are kinked, you won’t get a fair curve when you assemble the frog. Heres an example along with my solution (middle of three). The trick is to clamp the scarfs against a long piece of steel or aluminum angle. Once I started doing this, ALL my glueups have been straight. Give it a try if you’re struggling to get straight stringers with multiple scarfs. HH
    2 points
  6. Padre, it was definitely unnerving flying the drone. If doing it again i'd launch from the stern deck because the drone immediately attempts to stop moving over the ground once airborne so you have to fly away quickly to avoid sailing into it. The cockpit coaming cutouts are standard on the 17mk3 and i'm sure you cut add them to your boat. There is no divider but I did add a divider on my 20mk3. Here is a picture I did that so i could put stuff in there without it sliding back and not being able to reach it. I knew any oars I use would be 2 piece and so would fit in the stern part. The coaming space was never factored into the floatation of the boat they're purely aesthetic and functional for cockpit comfort but of course if you seal them they will add some floatation and righting moment if they go under. We just did some more capsize testing of the Chiefs CS-17 Mark3 with a mast head float and i'll post the results soon. Hey Joe! thanks. Its the first time I've ever tried flying the drone off a moving boat. I did 2 flights and the first one the boat was wing on wing. Unfortunately the drone wasn't recording!!! but i did get some still images so thats how i got that shot. The second flight we gybed the main to make it easier to fly away from the boat after takeoff.
    2 points
  7. Nice video. And nice catch of the drone. I haven’t tried flying mine yet (bought one last year on a whim) but will begin once I’m home from this vacation. Seems a bit nervy to fly from and back to a moving boat… but if I can develop some skill with the controls… maybe. At least it’s proven here to be a possibility. From what I can see the boat looks well built with some great extra features. I caught this glimpse of a cutout in the coaming… very handy looking for tucking things away. And it looks like it is blocked off from the rest of the coaming to preserve flotation. (The best snapshot I could get.)
    2 points
  8. I have been working pretty slowly these days. Lot’s of other things that need doing but still making forward progress. I have the hull painted with System Three Pennant. I rolled and tipped it and am happy with the result. If you look closely you can see some fine brush strokes but they are not objectionable. I rolled and tipped Rosie with Alexseal and it looks like it was sprayed. I am still glad I am using the waterbourne System three. No horrible smell and so easy to clean up. The shear strake will be painted a dark green which will look nice with the cream colored hull and deck. The bottom has been coated with epoxy and graphite. I wanted a black bottom and brought the black coating up around an inch above the designed waterline to create a contrasting stripe when she is in the water. Still need to paint the interior and deck but don’t expect that to take very long. Mahogany ply was not available when Graham and Alan cut out the parts for Lula. Graham was nice enough to send me some mahogany veneer which I was planning to use to cover the Okume transom. Longs story short, I found a WRC board in my stash and resawed and glued on the book matched pieces on to the transom. I like the look. With the help of a couple of friends and Luanne we flipped her right side up, back the trailer on Sunday. A friend with a CNC router cut out the Sapele name and trail boards. I have ripped up the rub and trim rails. They will get installed next week since I am heading over to the San Juan’s on Rosie for a few days. Most of what I have left to do are things that I enjoy. Adding pieces of wood that accentuate the beautiful lines of the boat, rigging, and details, details, details, etc. In the home stretch.
    2 points
  9. And that's how we learn, although sometimes not so publicly. But think of all the new, unforgettable techniques you have at hand (just drop an anchor!) for next time. Sail on!
    1 point
  10. Well… it’s a neat and slick way to go. The ball through a halyard bight pushed through the sailhead cringle is the system that came on a boat I bought. The ball slipped out when I raised the sail, resulting in the halyard end zipping to the top of the mast. I believe it came undone when I motored out and the wind was flipping the unhoisted sail around with a still loose halyard. It started a “comedy of errors”.
    1 point
  11. Lots of details and ideas. And, nicely done. (It’s in Youtube, in the “B&B Yacht Designs” channel.)
    1 point
  12. I appreciate everyone that posted pictures of their projects and finished frames. They helped me immensely. Here are some of mine. The spring clamps came in handy when positioning the stringers on the frames because of the one-handed operation. I also found adjustable bungy cords very effective.
    1 point
  13. Lookin' good! Please post pics when you get on the water.
    1 point
  14. I'm applying the two-part urethane today. It's a long story, but I previously paid for the Cape Falcon Kayak course and decided to use the skinning and coating method recommended by the proprietor of that company. My skin is thus 840 X-TRA Tuff Ballistic Nylon, covered by the two-part urethane that I colored with rare earth pigment. I also did the lacing system where you tighten up the skin before actually stitching, and then after stitching everything, hose down the entire boat. When it dries the skin is super tight. Looks wrinkled in these photos, which are before I soaked it. Not sure if I like the pigment infused urethane approach. Doesn't look the greatest, but I'm sure once it's in the water I won't care.
    1 point
  15. Thanks for the reminder. My Spindrift 10 mast is 5.2 meters slightly over 17 feet. I only had a bathroom scale to weigh it on. The mast weight is about 7 lbs or 3 something kg. My mast is 3 sections. The bottom two are aluminum the upper section is hollow wood.
    1 point
  16. Thanks very much Don
    1 point
  17. SOS and Chief in the Harlowe Waterway (2:30pm Wednesday June 15, 2022). Chief holding the oars.
    1 point
  18. Very nice. She will be a stunner.
    1 point
  19. She looks great mate
    1 point
  20. While mine is not a core Sound 17, the mainsheet setup is fairly standard. And for the snotter attachment, I just use a forked end on the sprit and a loop in my lashing block. And here is my sheeting setup for the mizzen. Hope this helps.
    1 point
  21. Good to hear you are enjoying your Spindrift. I should be up in RI in a week or so and I can get the weight and length of my Spindrift 10 mast to you for comparison.
    1 point
  22. Racerx: If you want to use wood, cedar isn't the best choice; it's too soft. I'd go with oak or ash, which you can soak or steam if necessary to take the curves. Those woods are tough. There are other woods that would work, but those two are the most common in North America. Have fun!
    1 point
  23. I have no experience with KeelEasy but, after perusing information on the product, I'd say that it all depends on how well it would adhere to the paint of a SOF boat. No way to answer that without trying, but I'm skeptical. A concern is the use of a heat gun for application. Too much heat and the paint would soften and bubble. On my Ravenswood, I used vinyl strips cut from bits of vinyl fencing. The strips are about 1/16" X 3/8" X 28". They are attached at the bow and stern with small stainless steel flathead screws. These strips have lasted for over 10 years with minimal wear.
    1 point
  24. Yay! Can’t wait for the maiden doing the maiden voyage.
    1 point
  25. Heading out for a month’s vacation. Today was my last chance to help The Weezer get her boat ready for a first sail. (She just completed 10th grade.) Still a few things for her to do: assemble a trailer kit, place the sail battens, install daggerboard bungee, practice and make some “tweaks”. (A reefing cringle wasn’t included in the leech of the sail; something to figure out when I’m back. Plus, she’s missing a part for the gooseneck that connects to the sail tack… it’s tied for now.) I look forward to heading to the lake with Norma T when she takes THE RITALOU out.
    1 point
  26. Steamed the coaming cap this evening.
    1 point
  27. Bah, Chick just wanted more boats to build.
    1 point

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