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  1. I have used Express Air which is located at the Victoria airport for importing things into Canada. They have a terminal in Blaine, Washington to receive the item then they truck/ferry it to Victoria. You go to the airport and walk the paper work through customs. They are quite reasonable cost wise. Last year I imported a vintage motorcycle in a crate and they charged me $50. I think I got a “good customer” deal on that but using this service has saved me a lot of money over the years.
    2 points
  2. There is no reason why you cannot build an equal quality boat from the plans. We use the same parts file for the full size plan sheets that come with the plans as the cut file for the kit. You do not have to do any scaling or lofting. If you are meticulous in marking and cutting, and use a good quality marine ply, you will have the same boat. You do have to do your own scarfing but you can do butt tape joints, which are just as strong but take extra fairing. The point that some have made about the huge time saving of the kit cannot be over emphasized. It all depends on your burnout index. If you have a bunch of unfinished projects in your life, starting from plans might not be a good idea. We have shipped quite a few kits to Canada but we usually get burned because the Customs finds an extra fee or two that was not in the shipping quote. The cost does go up as it crosses the border. We have shipped to an address on this side of the border and the customer has driven over and picked it up. If it can be picked up from a depot, everyone can save a bundle because they charge a lot for home delivery and the mk3 kit is so heavy that you need a truck with a forklift. The lid is just screwed down but drivers cannot wait for you to remove the lid and decant the contents. As for headroom, at 6'5" you would be much happier with the 20. I was on Carlita yesterday and thinking of you at 6' 5". At 5' 7" my head just touched the underside of the 1" deep beams sitting sitting tall on 2" cushions which squashed down to about 1/2". The extra 2" in the 3.2 version would not be enough for you, not to mention the extra legroom that you will need. After my trip to Port Townsend we brought out the updated MK3.2 version incorporating everything that we had learned. The main modification was to add 2" more headroom in both models. Everyone I talked to at the Wooden boat festival talked about headroom. Most of the the other modifications were to make it easier to build. There is not a lot more work in the 20 as they both have the same building steps. The 20 does have more surface area to glass, sand and paint.
    2 points
  3. The Weezer has painted the inside to her satisfaction but the paint needs more time to harden. As I write it’s -1 degrees and heading down for the night. There is some heat in the garage so we’ll see how things are in the morning. We cut some boards for the building form that can be used to support the boat when we flip it, hopefully tomorrow morning. Just for fun, she placed the missing seat, trunk, and deck pieces to see what it will look like. I think it is looking great. (Gunwales will be white, not taped blue .)
    2 points
  4. Happy new year. Yes they did. I stood the crate upright in the the garage and wrapped it with Christmas paper. It looked like the monolith from 2001: Space Odyssey except red, white and green instead of black. I asked them to take garbage out so they could "discover" it. We plan on beginning the build middle of April and will certainly start a build log and thread for it.
    2 points
  5. Hello, I'm interested in the core sound 17 & 20 mk3 designs. I wonder how realistic it is for a home builder to build the boats successfully with plans only (no kit). I'm located in Canada so it might be cost prohibitive for me to have a kit shipped up here. I especially wonder about the "puzzle piece" joints that I see in the finished boats. These look like they would be quite tough to cut out accurately with a jigsaw. I'd also like to know what the sitting headroom is in both the 17 & 20 mk3. I'm a tall guy (6'5") and based on the core sound 17 mk3 tour video I am convinced that there is room for me to sleep aboard but I have not been able to find any concrete information on how much headroom there is between the seat and the ceiling of the cabin. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Alan
    1 point
  6. You are NOT wasting your time. You are an engineer and do the BEST way. I'm an ADD kid and do the EASIEST way.
    1 point
  7. Actually, I’m planning to plane tomorrow. And that’s the plain truth!
    1 point
  8. I'm sure I'm gonna get fussed at about this, but... I've built many boats over the years including a princess 22 Sharpy, Core Sound 20, and Outer Banks 20 and butt joined all of them with no problems. I guess I'm just lazy, but (sorry about the pun), I'm perfectly happy doing it. I've tried scarfing and it is just to much work for a lazy person. (And I do have ADD.)
    1 point
  9. Ouch! My neck hurts! Unrotated photos hurt my neck. So does eating tacos..
    1 point
  10. OMG. Think of the cruising possibilities Vancouver has to offer!
    1 point
  11. Alan from B&B just got back to me. I'll document this here is case anyone is looking for the information in the future. The sitting headroom in the Core Sound 20 mk3 is either 35 1/8" or 37 1/8". Apparently you can lower the benches by two inches by cutting them down to provide the extra headroom.
    1 point
  12. Thanks for all the responses. Yes I should probably get a shipping quote before ruling that option out completely. It seems that building from a kit is highly preferred and would likely contribute to the overall success of the project. Alan from B&B responded to my previous email and gave me the sitting headroom measurement (33 1/2") for the Core Sound 17 mk3. At my height that would be a tight squeeze and I couldn't really sit without hunching over. I am still hoping to get the same measurement (from bench to ceiling) for the Core Sound 20 mk3 either from Alan or someone on the forum.
    1 point
  13. About all I’m doing these days is to walk across the street to look at what The Weezer’s been doing, and to take a picture of her progress. It’s 8:30 am, I finally dressed and ate some breakfast. She already sanded the hull and nearly finished applying a second coat of primer. Clearly the morning schedules of an active high school kid are different from a retired guy. This is where things are as I “interrupted” her morning work. Edit: 15 minutes later, The Weezer sent me this : Now, having done all my morning “work”, I am going skiing. ⛷
    1 point
  14. Pretty cool boats,, Old Codgers need to find a working Sea Gull engine so that you can find your way back home following the oil slick.
    1 point
  15. Just a couple of thoughts. I'm in reasonable shape, but not a powerlifter and I have no trouble putting the mainmast up with one hand, mostly lifting with my legs to get things going. The key is to be farther forward than you think. I stand on the cabin top at the ramp, which is pretty high up. With my shoulder holding the mast forward I reach down and add the levered nut. I am 6' tall with long arms which helps. I think the only challenge is a rolling sea. The mast is only really captive in it's seat and there would be a lot of leverage on the pivot bolt. I think the mizzen would be pretty easy. I have an interest in this as I plan on doing a trip down the Erie canal and I'll need to switch to a sail rig at Cross and Oneida and Onondaga lakes.
    1 point
  16. Im changing my plan and looks like I will put the Core Sound 17 on the boat lift once I get the bottom part of the lift rebuilt later this year. Ive decided I will just use the Davits to lift it for service if needed in the future. Im sure the boat lift company will figure something out when they replace the cables on the davits aswell. But mainly the davits will be used to lift for service and nothing else. The boat lift has no cover so mast are no problem either.Centerboard will just be cranked up and will slide right on the trunks on the lift. It should make things easy. Im going to have a whole new dock wrap around walkway built to make easy access to it too.
    1 point
  17. The Kid is Charging Ahead I didn’t even check in with The Weezer yesterday. When I did so last night she was at Lowes getting some supplies. I stopped in this morning with my small can of anti-slip compound for the sole and she had already finished the third coat on the seats and sides. She added a bit more red to make the paint a tad darker. (Mixing the compound into some pink paint to add coats to the sole.) Notice how I’m not doing anything? With on-line school this week (and possibly next) we’ll likely flip the hull soon so she can complete the painting. Maybe she’ll install the middle pieces (she left them bright finished) before flipping.
    1 point
  18. I just realized that my friend Jan’s Spindrift 12 is red and white. If you put it in a blender, it would turn out pink!
    1 point
  19. Wonderful. Delightful. Inspiring. This thread is giving me grins. Keep up the good work!
    1 point
  20. Dnjost, I’ve read some of your stuff in the forum and have enjoyed your contributions. If a cabin isn’t as important as people space, I understand that B&B is about ready to offer a new variation on the Core Sound 20 using Mark3 features (water ballast, centerboard to the side of the cockpit, motor well, self-draining cockpit (I think), two tabernacles, etc.). It’s being called SR20, I think. (SR is for self-righting… isn’t THAT a cool feature?) An aspect that really intrigued me about SR20 is the open cockpit. My CS15 (Norma T) has carried 4-6 adults in the open cockpit (lake sailing) and I like all the room available in a 20 foot version of Core Sound. (I note that some have added a dodger to open boats for a bit of spray protection.) I was ready to buy plans for SR20 when available and build it from a kit that I believe is either available or just around the corner. Then, I encountered Avocet being for sale and I bought it (CS17 Mark3 number 6 hull). It when right into storage and I haven’t experienced it yet. I will find the forum posts about the SR20 from Alan and add it to another post. You might really like what it offers. I bring this up here because of your concern about raising and lowering masts. An open cockpit CS20, in the new Self-Righting version, might make the process easier than with a Mark3 with a cabin. In the SR20 there is no centerboard trunk in the middle of the forward cockpit area (ease of movement) and there is a tabernacle for each mast.
    1 point
  21. (Be sure to check The Weezer’s most recent post at the bottom of the previous page — she added it this morning and THIS post forced a new page.) —————————————————— She’s Working Well — Starting the Inside Topcoats The high School shut down for 10 days. I heard there are over 400 infections and many staff are sick (unsure if the number is correct but the problem is significant.) On-line classes for the next week but this might give The Weezer time to move her boat toward completion. Three coats of primer, sanding and surface-wiping make things ready for topcoat paint. She intends that the eventual white on the gunwales will come down an inch inside, so things are taped off. She decided that what I’ve used, Interlux Brightsides, will be what she’ll use to finish her Spindrift. Pink isn’t available, but using my Goldenbook training as a kid (The Color Kittens) we’re gonna make our own. Hee hee hee… eye of newt… ear of bat… blood of Brightsides… Starting coat one. For the second coat she might darken it a tad, plus add some thinner to the mixture. Oh, and all I’m doing these days is talking. SHE is doing the doing.
    1 point
  22. After a long but successful high school season, the end of first semester, and getting my drivers license!!! I have finally found time to work on my boat. We put the first layer of white primer about a week ago. Then started mixing red paint and white primer to make pink primer and did the last 2 coats of primer pink! It was super cool to finally see what I have been picturing in my head come together. This morning I got up to start sanding with 220. And we will start working around 9:30 on the next steps. My goal was to get it done by the end of February but now that we are off school for a week I’m hoping end of January to mid February. If no curve balls come my way!
    1 point
  23. Alan sent me an email asking if I had any good pictures of Skeena to provide to SCA for a story Marty Loken was doing on "camp cruisers you can build". I sent a few pictures to Marty, including one that was taken by a photographer from CLC that was on a support boat on the trip to Cox Creek winery. My longtime friend and sailing partner Joe was with me. This trip was a new event at the MASCF. I got an email from Marty saying that that pic had been chosen for the cover, which has been quite a thrill for me. Building Skeena was a long process but having her is such a joy. I've been singing "when I get my picture on the cover, gonna buy five copies for my mother" who sadly isn't with us anymore, but was the one who instilled craftmanship into my life. Thanks Alan, Graham, Carla and all the fine folks at B & B, and to all those who showed me the way, and answered my questions. Barring catastrophe, I will see you at the messabout with covergirl Skeena.
    1 point
  24. I'm just chiming in as a Sea Pearl owner. I would echo the comments about giving your new boat some more time. As you might guess, I'm here because I really like the Core Sound design, either in addition to or in replacement of my Sea Pearl. In case you are serious about switching boats so soon, here are a few things to consider. The Sea Pearl would need some work to get up on the davits, too. Yes, there is a bow eye fore and two cleats aft, but it's also narrower, pointy on both ends, and four feet longer than the CS 17. On the SP21 message board there are posts about using davits that you would want to consult. Regarding the leeboards, yes they are exposed and easy to see, but there are also ramifications in sailing ability to consider. That may be good for you or not. Plus, with the Sea Pearl, yes you can see the leeboards, but if the universal joint is broken, you cannot replace that with plywood and epoxy. There are pros and cons to both. If I can be blunt, you're making a mountain out of what is in reality a once a year inspection issue. You bought the boat to sail, not inspect the centerboard. Take a peek, make sure it's solid, fix or alter it if you want, and go sailing. If you don't like the CS 17 after that, give me a ring and I'll tow it north from my spring break trip for you
    1 point
  25. Thanks Weezer for the encouragement. You sound like my older son; He's busy with many interests and hobbies.
    1 point
  26. There are cheap microwaves for 50 bucks or so at wallyworld. But for some reason I have never connected the dots of epoxy and pop tarts. But now that you bring it up, maybe that's why I seem to gain more weight when microwaving and eating pop tarts while building boats . I guess they stick to me more than normal.
    1 point
  27. Thanks so much everyone, working on masts now, maybe in a week or so I can show you what it looks like with masts up!
    1 point
  28. Hi Nick, The Mk3 was never meant to be an offshore boat. Just as you rightly said about the skippers ability, the same thing can be said about the boat. For instance on Carlita's cruises all of my stores and gear was stored under the bunks and the lids were dogged down, I had a downhaul on the centerboard to prevent it from crashing down in a capsize, the hatches were well gasketed and dogged down when underway. My reefing system was well sorted out. I have not got around to a masthead float yet but I think it is a good idea. If I was planning to go further offshore I would look into adding some more ballast to the centerboard and outside on the keel. I also carried a PLB and a Spot tracker. Although I never made it to Tassie, I have great respect for the weather down there. My sister circumnavigated it a few years ago in a S&S 33. I would love to have Carlita down there for a season. The main advantage of the mk3 is that you do not have to do the dodgy offshore passages, just trail to the best places. I have found that when I do the offshore legs I never get around to cruising the new areas in depth when I get there because I am sailed out and I am starting to concentrate on the next leg. It is the reverse when I trail to the new place.
    1 point
  29. And the name shall be “KALOS”. In the New Testament, Greek lexicon beautiful, handsome, excellent, eminent, choice, surpassing, precious, useful, suitable, commendable, admirable beautiful to look at, shapely, magnificent good, excellent in its nature and characteristics, and therefore well adapted to its ends genuine, approved precious And who doesn’t think their boat is all that!
    1 point
  30. Doggone if I know what I was thinking. I was young and kinda dumb back then.
    1 point
  31. Some Pink Primer I stopped in today to see how the first coat of primer is turning out. The Weezer had already sanded things. For a second coat of primer we added about six or eight teaspoons of red paint to about 2/3 quart of white primer… making a light pink. Then, I left to let her do the whole process on the second coat. The Weezer has been very skilled at seeing a process and duplicating it. She might even enlist her older sister (home from college) to help out. (Paint fight in the making??? ) The plan is light pink inside, deeper pink (is that a thing? ) for the outside, white for a bootstripe and the gunwales, and bright for the thwart, deck, dagger board and rudder. Her white sail is SPECIAL ORDERED from B&B with pink numbers. Should be a nice looking combination.
    1 point
  32. SOOOO… Did the boys see the kit? And, are you guys gonna start a new thread about your fun Spindrift project?
    1 point
  33. Christmas break, and The Weezer is back from family visits with some time to start the painting process. Yay! I thought we might as well try out the “roll and tip” approach in the initial primer coat. Biggest challenge? Maybe keeping her hair out of the paint???
    1 point
  34. I know. I was just explaining it to Hirilonde.
    1 point
  35. I agree, it is a small price to pay to help support the financial burden of this forum and no ads is a great motivator. Frank should not have to bear the burden of the money to run this forum, and I doubt sincerely he is getting rich off this place. This forum is like my subscription to the Washington Post, it is part of my daily reading.
    1 point
  36. My wife came up with an Amazon order for two 5’ rolls of outdoor use stick-on vinyl in black and white that we will use for making the fish-faces instead of trying to paint those details. (My hand just wouldn’t paint this as well as my cutting vinyl with a scissors.) We temporarily taped on some cut black paper pieces to see what the yellow float might look like. (The red float will get white vinyl pieces for the face.)
    1 point
  37. I’ve appreciated the No-Ads approach of being a supporting member… at $12/year ($1/month)
    1 point
  38. I haven't seen that one. Is it on the mast floats thread?
    1 point
  39. @PadrePoint— I love ya like a brother, man, but if you start doing that face yoga around me, I might get violent! LOL. Merry Christmas!
    1 point
  40. Backup if the tent doesn’t work out.
    1 point
  41. I started on my mast spacers today. I also ordered a new product I’m excited about. It is a fairly new chemical for prepping aluminum for paint. It is used for prepping aircraft for primer. It is used by the USAF, Boeing, etc. It eliminates the need to use some nasty chemicals. And it must be better than the Rustoleum I used on Local Honey’s masts. Those are chipping badly. Here’s a website describing the product: http://pantheonchemical.com/prekote-wipes/#application I ordered a canister of wipes from aisdirect.com. I’ll probably send a few wipes to Alan Stewart for “evaluation”.
    1 point
  42. Hi salty cracker I had to take a break during my high school swim season so I have not been working much. Point padre just got the paint for my boat in so I hope to start painting it myself next weekend! I know you will love building a boat with your kids! It will be a forever memory! My best advice is take time! Don’t rush it. And it’s OKAY to make mistakes I made multiple mistakes and we found away to fix them all! Don’t get frustrated just take your time!
    1 point
  43. Murray, the paint was Aquacote, from Boatcraft Pacific. The colour is Sand. You can see a colour chart at https://boatcraft.com.au/informationpages/aquacotecolourcard.htm. I’ve used Aquacote on a couple of boats now and I am very happy with it. Peter
    1 point
  44. Yup… we didn’t replace kitchen counter tops when renovating our house 8 years ago. But now that I’m retired and “done” building boats, guess what house task is rising up. Actually, I found myself toying around with the idea of making a RC scaled version of my CS15, the Norma T… maybe a 1/6th version at 30”. There’s gotta be SOMETHING to get in the way of replacing perfectly serviceable countertops, sink, and faucet.
    0 points
  45. For the record, you forgot Chrysler.
    0 points

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