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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/05/2022 in all areas

  1. Finished up a Tadpole for the neighbors kid. Was a fun build. Went quicker then the long and short shot for sure.
    3 points
  2. And even more fun… I don’t have to think at all about how to do this.
    2 points
  3. I started on the bow roller. Here, I’m gluing a triangular plate underneath the deck. Next, I’ll add a knee. Since it is cool outside, the anchor locker is a mini-sauna. Once the way is clear, I want to ask y’all’s opinion on roller placement. There are a few options, all good.
    2 points
  4. I did my bushings in stages, measuring after the epoxy set, but not fully cured, until they were the correct size. I hate sanding any more than I have to and more than having to add wraps.
    2 points
  5. Great Messabout, we sure had a good time, good to sea everyone! Thanks to everyone that shared photos with Carol an myself. Kalos had a meeting with Alan an Graham, few rather minor mods to be done, adding a bit to the leading edge of the rudder, increasing the pivot angle of the windvane, and added 15 lbs of lead to the tip of the centerboard. The centerboard didn’t want to extend when sailing, hopefully this bit of weight will encourage it to drop more positively.
    2 points
  6. Having someone who is a "pro" is a nice asset. My son is a much better seamster than me, but design is on me. Experience is valuable and saves paralysis by analysis. I think I'd take inspiration from the excellent tents available to figure a more boxy or hooped encloser. You have some advantages as the anchor points can be fixed and tension can be higher. I love this awning. We made it with collapsible shock poles, but I found out it would slip into the cabin rolled up and lay along the hull on the bunks and I never take the poles out. On my sun shade I use this to tension the ridgeline. It is easy to both setup and tension (like a piano wire!). Facing aft with my back to the cabin with a cold beer under that thing after a long hot sail, waking to no dew on the forward part of the cockpit or or standing up or sleeping in the cabin hatch while the rain sheds over the side is fantastic. I like the Dodger idea, but for now this works and is simple. I might also add it's good so far in 30 knot winds. I haven't had it deployed beyond that.
    1 point
  7. Nice work, but here's an opinion.........the high sprits help, but not making these tents more boxy really makes them tight inside. It's a bit more work to run a spreader or a hoop, but they are a game changer for comfort. If you are going to go through that much work, I'd drape a blanket over the sprits and imagine if I could live with that first. When I watch Roger Barnes videos, I get claustrophobic......
    1 point
  8. Thanks for the interest in watching grass grow and the replies. It was a pleasure to work along side of the new hire. The price was right, a piece of baloney with one piece of white bread per day. I have been busy making progress with some additional details between finishing up the second layer. Of course the new shot does not show the detail of the team care of getting the first layer as fair as possible for the second layer, which deals with how much work you will need in the glassing and fairing process before paint. So for anyone considering a cold mold hull, while you want to get the hull planked up, spend time in the set up phase and when you are installing your battens that they are fair the entire running length. Then as you are gluing up the thinner first layer don't attempt to screw your layers right at the butt seams, which will create deeper areas to fill when you are applying the thickened glue for the second layer before you want to install the second layer. And of course you really do not want to grind down the any humps a way back from the seams if you tighten down too close to the edge. Figure your second layer that they will land middle way of the first layer, which will further make the outer laminate fairer by the natural tendency in the first layer to not be so flat to the battens. Hope this will help someone watching. Will be grinding all the edges to shape at the sheer and reverse chine flats and clean up all the excess seam resin this week. At this point in time I will figure out what I think will be the location of the bow eye for the trailer, since we have one for it to fit on before I work on the opposing side and get it ready for planking. I like to do this because its much easier with the access when standing along side of the area. Since the stem back is open I can do what I need to counter bore and recess any coupler for an extension since I have not been able to access 1/2" bow eyes with the threaded shafts long enough to fasten to the back side with its nuts on the original ends. More to follow on my process, unless someone can tell me where I can find approx 5 inch stainless steel eyebolts. And yes as you can see my moaning chair has filled up a bit too. Okay now
    1 point
  9. A Tent for a Core Sound 17 This boat was beautifully built by a guy in Michigan and sold to a Florida person who has created a tent. I hope to see it some day, at least more photos and maybe a video of putting it in place.
    1 point
  10. After losing my Spindrift 11N I tried to go the inflatable route to use as a dinghy. Unfortunately my $2000 takacat had a half dozen leaks in less than 5 months. It also didn't sail or row worth a damn so I decided to build another B&B boat to use as a tender. One of the first lines in the build instructions is not to rush. So since it took 11 months to build my Spindrift I gave myself a month to build the Catspaw. I started building in late July and called it good enough for now in early September. So about 6 weeks in all. I'm still trying to source a mast and sail before I leave the country for a couple years. Here are some photos of the build and I'll update the thread as I continue to work and modify the boat.
    1 point
  11. It’s that time of year again. Sometime around Thanksgiving, the Small Boats annual magazine arrives at the newsstands. Barnes & Noble in Cottonwood Heights, Utah only brings in six copies, so Joan gets there early (not that there’s a big demand for them around here) to buy one, wrap it and put it under the tree. I usually intercept it at the door. I was delighted, though not surprised, to see Ken Katz’s article about his OB26, Rosie. She’s a beauty; to be sure. Realizing I hadn’t checked in on the messing-about forum for a long time, I took the time to review many posts, including his...the Spindrift (Kendrift) 9, Lapwing 16 Lula (love that name) with hollow bird’s mouth masts, and Cat’s Cradle, a 33’ steel sailboat. I learned of Cat’s Cradle a few years ago, but I didn’t understand the magnitude and complexity of that project until just now. I also learned that a longer article with more photos of Rosie appeared last February in the monthly addition of Small Boats. Ken, your work is amazing. The Outer Banks series is a wonderful design and you did right by it.
    1 point
  12. Carter- I didn’t know the article made it into the annual magazine. Thanks for letting me know. Thanks for the kind words on my obsessions. From what I saw in your last post on your OB20 build you are doing the design proud as well! Ken
    1 point
  13. Will do! Unfortunately it’s gotten to cold to get him out there so it’ll have to be in spring! It’s polyester and an oil based paint from the local paint shop. The color was called tomato red.
    1 point
  14. Nice! Lucky kid! Come spring, try and get us a review of how the kid likes paddling it.
    1 point
  15. Merry Christmas to everyone. I have been making progress, just haven't gotten to the point of posting some of the boring progress of planking. The big guy came for a bit and sped up the progress with assembly line precision, operating the sharpie for the cuts and the kept the screw gun smoking. Luckily the screw gun had a protective coating of epoxy to cool down the heat transfer to the hands. Will provide pictures in the next couple of days when I get things cleaned up on the one side.
    1 point
  16. @PadrePoint— And for me, it is a design problem. What fun!
    1 point
  17. Currently, there is no knee. I have a choice of adding a 1/2” or 3/4” thick one. One is shown on both Graham and Chief’s boats in those videos. Also, there is even less room on a 17 for packing this all in. So, my current plan is to go straight with the roller (like Graham did), put the cleat just to port of the tabernacle (like you did), through bolt the base plate, straddling the knee, and using T-nuts to attach the roller to the base plate. Before I do, I want to make sure I can get those beefy T-nuts in stainless. I would also appreciate hearing from others, before I glue in the knee.
    1 point
  18. This guy has a number of videos with a dinghy cruising emphasis.
    1 point
  19. Don, those look sweet!
    1 point
  20. A newsletter article in Small Boat Advisor’s virtual “Winter Boat Show” The SBA wrote to their email list folks an invitation to write about their boat… pros and cons… that might be included in their virtual boat show. This is what I submitted. It was included in their Day 2 email. I guess I didn’t come up with any cons. Oops. B&B Core Sound 15, Ted Johanson: “When I retired in 2020 I stumbled upon the BandBYachtDesigns.com website and bought the full kit of their Core Sound 15 sailboat. The “stimulus” checks my wife and I received during COVID covered most of the kit cost, and stimulated a great small business. The kit had everything needed (except for screws, nuts, and bolts to mount the the fittings.) All pieces were exactly cut and fit together beautifully. The boat was finished and launched within 3 months of my getting the kit home. Some reasons that I enjoy this boat so much: 1. Alan Stewart of B&B made a series of twenty videos that taught and showed me every step in building the boat… ‘I can DO this!!’ 2. I appreciate all of the coaching and answered questions offered by B&B during the building process. 3. I like how the cat ketch boat sails and how the hull moves through the water. 4. Set up at the boat launch takes ten or fifteen minutes, unless someone comes up to inquire about my boat… a frequent occurrence, but I enjoy talking about the boat. 5. I can pull it to the lake with my very small car and can push the boat around my yard for storage. 6. The CS15 can comfortably hold 5 or 6 people with the wide open cockpit and seating. 7. It seems like a safe boat and will not ‘turtle’ with the mast float. 8. My wife and family enjoy sailing it.”
    1 point
  21. I thought maybe you’d save some of your epoxy clothes to do a sermon in. One entitled “Things might need to get messy in order to create something beautiful.”
    1 point
  22. At 140 I’d go LV too. My wife and I have LV and standard. I weigh 160–here I am in her LV. I like how it feels even though I’m at the upper end for the LV.
    1 point
  23. Finally found the link to Alan's mod that I was thinking of (I did a number of searches on the forum. This came up on the second page of results for "outboard well 17")
    1 point
  24. Dave, I got a set of bronze oarlocks from Jamestown. Think they were Buck Algonquins, and the inner diameter is 2.25" . Nice and beefy. I also just learned something IMPORTANT about this afternoon about the idea of having oars in half. If you place them on a dock (or deck,or any flat surface...) and the wind kicks up as it did here today , the UPPER halves now have nothing to stop them from being blown by the wind, since the blades are only on the lower halves... In my case this meant that BOTH upper halves caught a good gust and made a break for the Bay ! Luckily as soon as I realized they were in transit I was able to round up a posse of jetskiers and finally gave them a purpose in their lives...So what could have been disastrous turned out to be informative, and humbling,all at the same time....
    1 point

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