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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/10/2021 in all areas

  1. I was gone for about 10 days so The Wheezer was on her own. I think that getting herself ready for yesterday’s state swim meet additional to school occupied much of her time. (Ask her how things went.) So, first day back... we got the daggerboard trunk and seat tops installed. It took me a while to recall/figure-out the various steps for an orderly installation of the pieces. (We’ll do the two centerpieces of the seat tops later.) Great progress on a first day. 😃
    2 points
  2. The instructions for the centerboard pin was correct for the the mk3.1's. On the mk3.2 which you are building, the board was moved forward causing us to flip the pin as the cover plate hit the bunk top. On the mk3.2 we decided to give up on the detailed instructions and do more detailed plan sheets but we threw in the instructions anyway. We will look into the instructions correct them. It should not be a problem to back fill the hole. If you are you are concerned you could put a small glass patch over the hole on the outside. My preferred bumper is to turn the trunk upside down
    2 points
  3. Congrats to Graham and the B&B crew. Marissa is featured in the latest Small Boats Monthly, with a rave review. https://smallboatsmonthly.com/article/marissa-18/?utm_source=MC&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=marissa-18&utm_content=Article-Image&utm_campaign=Email-2021-NonSub1-April
    2 points
  4. Yoga mats! The thing about working in the guts of a boat with real compartments and bilges is you need yoga to limber up before crawling in there and yoga after you get done to get the kinks out. that is a beautiful build. Envious...of the boat, not the backaches!
    2 points
  5. 2 points
  6. Here is a FROG photo of my Curlew frame taken yesterday and a photo of its partially completed oak coaming. I was able to put the first coat of tung oil on my completed Curlew frame, ten years after purchasing the plans and many years after assembling the frame with zip ties. Thanks to my friend Steve Rouse for his help and his woodworking shop. We built the form for the coaming from the offsets in the book and just have to glue on the lip. We used 1/8th inch green white oak strips which we sanded with 80 grit paper, then wiped with alcohol before gluing with gorilla glue. The wood was in
    2 points
  7. A car in the garage? How strange.
    2 points
  8. I have had some success removing (minimizing) runs and curtains by using a cabinet scrapper. Best done when the epoxy is hard enough but not to hard. Sandpaper is inclined to get the surface smooth but not necessarily flat. Best is not to leave the runs in the first place. Force yourself to apply the epoxy as thin as possible, but epoxy can be a little diabolical, waiting patiently until you are tired and have turned in for the evening to creep into a line or lump. Do as well as you can but, remember it is a boat and at some point it will not be in your living room. Speaking of w
    2 points
  9. Thanks everyone. Mama and Henry are doing great. Very difficult delivery ending in c section but it's all over now. He is perfect.
    2 points
  10. New B&B design stats: Design name: Henry Wilder Stewart LOA : 21" 53.34cm Disp: 7lbs 5oz 3.32kg
    2 points
  11. This glowing review by builder Trey Williams sounds like my own experience building my sailboat last year... an excellent kit and superb, patient, and personal support from Graham and Alan. I’m hopeful the article and others like it generate good business for B&B Yachts.
    1 point
  12. Just letting the world know....still at it! Really enjoying the build. This is the overhead at the nav station and galley area, radio installation is completed and the motor bay, not much to see there. The blue bundle in the motor bay is the Torqeedo battery, just layed a old yoga mat over it so I don’t short out as I crawl in and out. Soon I will be starting the disassembly project for final coat of varnish. Boy, there are a lot more wiring projects than I initially thought! May have gone “overboard “ on some of it!
    1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. The longer I live with the boat the less I am noticing the bumps, runs, and dents that are showing through the paint. I have to say I'm extremely impressed with the two pack paint. Excellent coverage from just two coats, and very very hard. I have painted a yacht with expensive marine enamel (one pack) and that was nowhere near as good, taking weeks to reach any sort of hardness. Today was spent turning an old shelf in to the thwart. It was a battered old piece of wood given to me by a friend, and it turned out rather well after some aggressive sanding back. I found fitting th
    1 point
  15. Thought I would post a couple pics of my current build. The Oc 20-B is coming out of paint soon .
    1 point
  16. Had not thought of the washer idea — but I’d like something I didn’t have to think about. Not concerned about mast rotation — a key notch in the step prevents that anyway. And I’ve thought about tying the mast as Dave suggests. But again, that’s just one more thing to remember. With a tube, and the worst happens (boat “turtles”), the mast just slides out — but only so far because the vang and reefing lines are still “stop-knotted” behind their cleats. And even if the sail is stowed and boom still hinged to the mast, the boom will be in a crutch (aft) or held up by th
    1 point
  17. I try very hard to make the exterior of my boat and some interior details near perfect. Good enough is my standard for the inside of the hull. There is a limit to how much sanding and refilling I will do inside corners, concave surfaces and other such places.
    1 point
  18. Thanks for the great video I especially like the drone shots and it serves as a great trip report. You guys did an awesome job in some tough conditions. It sounds like getting into flamingo this year for many was a real challenge. I agree with Graham and Peter here on the topping lift regarding main reefing and I think also the dodger was a big contributor to slowing the boat down especially sailing into the stronger winds. That thing is just a sail pushing you backward all the time and the problem goes up be the square of the wind speed! Sailing in the dark also makes it a lot harder to see w
    1 point
  19. No doubt baggy sails wouldn't have helped. Why were they baggy? Not enough luff tension/outhaul tension? I skimmed through the video and saw at one point the clew not pulled very tight and the rolled up reefs tied around the end of the spritboom- I usually ease the snotter until the reefed clew is right to the end of the boom and then pull the snotter on hard in heavy conditions. Heaps of luff and outhaul tension resulting in a flat sail is essential. Maybe you need more purchases? Having said that there comes a point when drive from the reduced sail area can't overcome drag f
    1 point
  20. Hi All- We were the guys sailing Chessie, just saw this thread and wanted to post a little update, and ask a question or two. We had 4 tough moments in the race, attributable to varying degrees of weather conditions and human errors. 1 - Attempting to get into Pine Island Sound through Boca Grande Pass at night, we were unable to sail up into the wind + current into the pass. I made a little screenshot below of our tracking map, the bit where it shows us going WSW, we were actually pointed ENE and getting carried backward. At night this was very disorienting. After a
    1 point
  21. Nice enough to keep the door open well we work today!!
    1 point
  22. I've epoxied in all the support strips and done the final shaping of the side support panels. I ran out of West systems 205 fast hardener, which is good down to 40ºf. I still have a bit of slow hardener but it is good down to 60º and it's been hovering around 62-63º during the day and will certainly be below that at night- it was getting down to 42º the other night. California problems. So a little trip to West Marine is in store this afternoon. I'm looking forward to measuring how much extra flotation this will give. My visual estimate is 10-15 gallons of flotation per side. That
    1 point
  23. I cut the holes and pre-drilled the screw holes for the bailer and epoxied the edges before I painted the hull. I also rounded off the edges a little to make the water drain a little easier. it looks really good. The one issue I had cutting the holes was all the interference from the centerboard trunk, the keel strip, etc etc etc. I had to do the cut from the outside of the hull to have enough room for the skillsaw.
    1 point
  24. I used flat battens covered in wax paper wedged in as you describe, to put a sharper corner back on after taping. The batten worked like one side of a mold to keep the goo out of the slot. It ended up giving that side of the fill a finish that only needed sanding. And then dull the sharp corner with a small radius by sanding.
    1 point
  25. When building Spindrift hull #1 I wasn't happy with my job of taping the outside of the trunk and pulled it out and decided to see how long it would last and I have not taped the outside of a small daggerboard trunk since. I have been fighting my desire for perfection and productivity all of my life. So far I have never had or heard of a failure. I long ago sold hull #1 but I do have a S12 which is about 20 years old and I have Amanda hull #1 which must be about 10 years old. Also on our racing Spindrifts we shaped the bottom slot to fit the foil to reduce turbulence which would made it very
    1 point
  26. THANK YOU, and again a very nice build.
    1 point
  27. Taylor and Alan just launched the heir to the Stewart clan. You all may have noticed that there were no Stewarts in this years EC, and that is why. I thought that he was going to be really cool and launch himself to coincide with the EC but no, he decided to emerge in his own time. Design name, LOA and displacement will be posted later.
    1 point
  28. I don't think there is any advantage to painting inside the centerboard case. However there is some advantage to practicing with the two part polyurethane. You refer to it as 2-pack polyurethane. If we are talking about the same product that is an aliphatic polyurethane paint a two component paint where the resin and a curing agent are mixed together and the paint must be used soon thereafter. This is arguably the best marine paint but the fumes released when using the paint are not to be trifled with. I would not recommend using this paint indoors. You are suppose to have supplied fresh air v
    1 point
  29. Congrats! An amazing future will be his!
    1 point
  30. Congrats to the happy family! A super fun journey is beginning.
    1 point
  31. He's smiling! Again, all the best to all of you.
    1 point
  32. Congratulations Alan and Taylor.
    1 point
  33. WOW!!! So lucky. Think of all the new tools you can buy him. Congratulations Alan an Taylor!
    1 point
  34. Congratulations Taylor and Alan!
    1 point
  35. That is wonderful, Taylor and Alan. I’m happy to hear this. You guys are great parents and your family is truly blessed.
    1 point
  36. Congratulations Alan and Taylor!
    1 point
  37. Blessings on you and your family. may you not have to encounter too many leaky bottoms.
    1 point
  38. Alan and Taylor. congratulations on the launch of your fleet my their be many more launches in your future, and that there fair weather and calm seas . He is absolutely darling looks like an admiral to me. all the best mark and Barbara
    1 point
  39. Well today was the day. It took nearly four months of on and off building but it happened, I successfully launched my Vardo. The build has been one of the most fun, challenging, and rewarding projects I have worked on. I have always wanted a boat. After finding Jeff's site and reading the forum I decided, I too could not just own a boat but build one. Thanks to the support of my patient and encouraging wife who helped make my Vardo a reality. A hearty thank you to Jeff and everyone on the forum. Whether you realize it or not you helped with this build. I am now officially hooked and con
    1 point
  40. I bet I am not to first to have “problems “ holding light fiberglass cloth up while you fit and apply the epoxy, I was glassing the ice box today and it is kinda hard to reach (didn’t think to do this before I installed the foam box). It came to me to try basting tape, I have a heavy sewing machine and basting tape is something I use a lot of. Well, a little strip of 3/8 basting tape holds the dry glass in place perfectly while you fiddle around getting it “just right”. After you apply epoxy I couldn’t find evidence of the tape through the laminate. Sure made it easier messing with the li
    1 point
  41. Best way to get in is sit straddle of the boat, park the butt in the boat and then pull in your legs. If you are not flexible enough to do that, it takes some practice but learn to sit on the back deck. Paddle behind you to one side both hands on the paddle and lean on it like a kickstand. Supporting yourself with your arms while holding on to the paddle shaft. Feet in the boat, then slide into the seat. It's hard at first but it a good trick to learn. The thing most people do wrong is not keep their weight on the paddle, you have to stay leaned to that side. I probably should
    1 point
  42. Well, she's built. Next up, sealing with Spar Urethane, then sewing the Dacron. This forum has been so helpful and supportive, especially Jeff. Thanks everyone. This has been so much fun so far!
    1 point
  43. So we finally had a nice day and I had a little time off so I launched my first home made kayak (the second one is slowly being painted)
    1 point
  44. I ordered the Vardo kit a few weeks ago and I have been slowly been working on it. Here are some photos of the build so far. I'll post more as things progress.
    1 point
  45. Several months ago I purchased the Vardo plans from Kudzu Craft. I have never built a boat, I have no woodworking skills, and I am no expert on Kayaks. A few friends of mine and I decided that we wanted to Kayak this year instead of going on our usual hike. We chose Yellowstone (Lewis Lake, and Shoshone Lake) and I set out to find a place to rent a kayak. While searching for a rental I came across KudzuCraft.com and was intrigued at the videos and the idea of building my own kayak. I spent a few months building the boat after work and in my spare time. I got really excited as it progress
    1 point
  46. Here is my seat, onto which I put a piece of 3/4" closed cell foam, then a Thermarest pad. It is simple and works well for me.
    1 point
  47. First trip to the pond for a test run, no deck rigging yet no float bags yet, but the wife couldn't wait. It floats and no leaks and she loves it. You know just carrying it to the waters edge I was stopped by a guy and got thirty questions. I don't know how I will handle all the celebrity. "you made that"? "looks cool"? whats this ? whats that? How? me - "go to KUDZU CRAFT dot com, it's easy". I got a camp pad (sleeping bag pad) from amazon it fits nicely in the cockpit from the frame at my feet to the frame behind my back it is 5/8 thick closed cell foam, there is enough material to fo
    1 point
  48. I am always impressed with the boats my clients build. But this is one of the best looking ones yet. The colors are outstanding and check out those seams! I don't know when I have seen one that straight. I have sewn a lot of boats and I am not sure mine are this straight!
    1 point
  49. Sort of a long story but VARDO was damaged because of operator error and I had to reskin her. Since I had intended this boat for use on a the creeks and rougher water I reskinned it in 12 0z nylon this time. The only thing I don't like about that is it adds 3 or 4 lbs to the boat over the lighter stuff. But it is easier to work with and I think the end results look better too. I also had a new water proofing finish I wanted to try that is water clear and and leaves the skin transparent. Here are photos from yesterday on the Paint Rock river. I want to thanks Steve for the photos!
    1 point


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