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  1. I like to make the "sockets" with a piece of PVC tubing set into a wooden block. The tubing needs to be drilled out slightly for a good fit with the horn.
    2 points
  2. Yesterday I started my boat! I got all my finger joints together and transom together!!! I can’t wait to keep working today!
    2 points
  3. We started the build today, learning to mix epoxy and thicken it for gluing. The Wheezer is a fast learner. I demonstrated the various processes needed to glue finger joints, but she did everything (feels a little lazy to just “watch”.) Three hours and the finger joints (bottom, sides, seat tops) and the assembled/glued transom were set aside to cure. The build is moving along. 😁 Again... it is SO nice having a B&B sailboat kit with the CNC cut parts.
    2 points
  4. As the good folks at Morgan Yacht shop used to say back in my young days. "Don't force it---get a bigger hammer!"
    2 points
  5. Happy New Year Don, it seems you’ve done your due diligence thinking through the tent selection and I now better understand the challenges. Choosing a side entry is a good choice with the tents you’ve selected and I’d like to offer up another two suggestions. First, Since we’re working with such limited space, foremost in my mind would be selecting a tent which is easy to set up and even free standing. Second concern, and again this is my preference, is maximum ventilation. like the idea of lots of mesh but that can be a double edge sword. I’ve experienced my fair share of early mornin
    2 points
  6. MANY years ago I considered an open boat with tent arrangement, or a removable cuddy. After all the considerations you are discussing, I'm sure glad all my cruisers would have cabins. Time to BUILD a new boat, Don!
    2 points
  7. Amos, this is mostly me just whining. I have a way of bumping something that has epoxy on it and passing it to other things... and that stuff is tenaciously sticky. This morning I noticed a “dirt smudge” on my wrist that wouldn’t just wipe off... a leftover from yesterday’s work that I missed when cleaning up... OR I picked up the smudge WHEN I was cleaning up. See... whining at my own carelessness. 🤪 And, I am going to run out right now to get some frosting bags for The Wheezer. 🙂 I didn’t try this when I built my CS15.
    1 point
  8. Yup. Outwales tomorrow. (These were thin tack welds.)
    1 point
  9. Chick is right about keeping your weight near the center thwart, at least when sailing solo. Too far back, and the transom gets down in the water creating turbulence and drag. For my CS15, I made my first tiller too short and had to reach back to get the trim right. To compensate, I made my 2nd tiller too long. Too long is when it's awkward to shift across the cockpit when tacking and jibing. Also, if you make the tiller long, its easy to make it shorter. Not so, the other way 'round, I found. My tiller pivots up like the ones above. Sometimes it's nice
    1 point
  10. Progress so far: all major panels cut out, transom and bulkhead assembled, the two sets of floor/side panels are joined at the bow and ready for stitching. Cradle set up (I had an old bed to get rid of so modified that as a frame). I'm surprised how much time it took to epoxy together the transom and nesting bulkhead. Maybe I should have enlisted SWMBO to mix the batches of epoxy and stir in the silica. I've ordered some better (larger!) epoxy tools which should speed things up a little. I'll upload a few photos when I get a chance. Hoping to do the grand opening tomorr
    1 point
  11. I'll make a couple of comments. Re the sprits. In theory each sail has a good and bad tack depending on whether the sprit is affecting sail shape or not, so it is usual to rig the sprits on alternate sides so one tack isn't all bad and the other all good. In truth there's not much difference. My brother used to race his Bolger Gypsy (which has a sprit rig) against another Gypsy identical except the sprit was rigged to the other side. The boats sailed similarly on each tack- he couldn't tell any difference. When reefing the sail ties should be around the sail only, not t
    1 point
  12. Thanks for the explanations. Very helpful. I made one-piece masts for my CS15 but I think The Wheezer would prefer this sectional approach for her Spindrift build.
    1 point
  13. I think Dave has it right. If you want to separate the tubes for transport, you'd never insert the tubes while any epoxy is not yet cured. Dave made his bushings one layer at a time until just a little too big, then sanded down to a proper fit for steadiness and ease of separation. My procedure was to wrap (modestly tight) the smaller tube with FG tape (end secured with masking tape) until the thickness was just the ID of the bigger tube (measured with a "mic") -- then [I would] lay out the FG on bench (surface covered with packaging tape) and wet it thoroughly with epoxy. Then
    1 point
  14. There are 2 major steps in making sectional masts that come apart, the bushings and the tapered transitions that act as stops and to smooth from one section to the next. I hate sanding. I built up my busings in steps until they were just a tad snug, then sanded to a very close but not snug fit. Then I dry fitted the pieces to the depthth called for and built the tapers out of tape, resin and filler. The whole thing is rather "fiddly". Left shows piece that fits into the step and keeps mast from rotating. Center shows section 2 that fits into the top of left section. Right
    1 point
  15. She just started and is addicted already. I'm blaming it all on PadrePoint.
    1 point
  16. Looks like you are off to a good start labeling the parts is a good idea. Building from a kit has a lot of advantages, but it does have one disadvantage. It is possible or rather inevitable that small errors will creep into your build. No matter how careful you are. If you are building from scratch it doesn't matter much. When it comes time to cut out your seat top you measure your boat and cut the seat tops out. If one side is a little wider than the other no one will know. When building from a kit it can be more of a problem because the seat tops are already precisely cut out. You can still
    1 point
  17. @Thrillsbe"Toilet in a bag" by Cleanwaste. Available at Amazon, Walmart, and maybe other places.
    1 point
  18. Todd, I’d make a lengthwise cut in the tube to get it off the pole (if you start at one end & progressively cut & try to remove it, you may get it off without having to cut the entire length). Then clean it up & put another couple of layers of glass around the outside.
    1 point
  19. It's nice to have another B&B in Wisconsin. Plus I like the colors, the name, the wooden seats. All worthy of you and the boat.
    1 point
  20. Lookin' forward to following you. I like the thought you are putting into the name.
    1 point
  21. Tonight I decided to label all the parts of my boat with sticky notes to help me get organized and familiar with the parts of my boat I can’t wait to start building!
    1 point
  22. This was my experience: I was thinking HOW to do it, to get enough counteracting force since my first hands only effort didn’t work. One thought I had, but didn’t need to act on, was to put a rope cinch on the fiberglass tube (or maybe some way to hook onto the end of the tube) and another cinch on the aluminum tube... then flipping the jaws of a bar clamp around to be a spreader... and hopefully... Don’t know if it would have worked. My all-I-had max-force arm-isometric approach was enough to make it juuuuust start moving. I needed a lot of rest times
    1 point
  23. Hi Todd, boat is looking good, I really like the colors you chose! I had the same problem, I couldn’t get the “form” out of the layup. I think my problem was the plastic sheet was too thin, when I pulled it did the “Chinese fingers” trick. I had to cut a thin relief cut to get it off. Boat is almost 5 years old, and I still have shards of light plastic inside my tube. I made another for the Flinders project with the same weight plastic that the contractors put under a concrete slab and it pulled right off.
    1 point
  24. Hi Don, I'm enthusiastic about this topic. Dinghy cruising was really the adventure I had in mind when I built my CS 15. About shelter, I used fire resistant polytarp for my boom tent. I worried that if my tent caught fire, there'd be nowhere to escape to. I also bought a cheap mosquito netting shelter from Wal-Mart that I attached to the inside of the tent. I can roll up the tent walls and let the breeze flow through. I second the recommendation of http://logofspartina.blogspot.com Steve Early is a great photographer. Also Roger Barnes youtube videos
    1 point
  25. Howdy Young Gun and welcome to the rodeo. You selected a wonderful design and will hopefully bring you a huge sense of accomplishment not to mention the joy of sailing and adventure.
    1 point
  26. No doubt. She doesn't look the slightest bit intimidated.
    1 point
  27. @Todd Stein— I was leaning toward more mesh, so I appreciate you sharing your wet setup experience. I shudder what sort of “friends” I would attract in the marshes of the Carolinas. Here’s my latest tent choice, although there are many other things to buy first.
    1 point
  28. Hi, just thought I would stop by and report what is new with Summer Breeze. As I suspect with a lot of us, C-19 has put a slowdown on a lot of plans. After building the oars for SB, I decided to go 'simple' (KISS) with the GPS mount and just drill some big holes into a piece of 2X6 (where a bungie can attach), varnish it, screwed in a garmin mount for my 546s and then just bungie it to the forward seat (with wiring running through companionway). This has turned out fine and in hindsight, I like it better than the 'swing-out from the companionway' type system a lot of people use because it a
    1 point
  29. I’ve done only one trip to that area that you speak of near Charleston but I’d like to go back. We sailed from McClellandville and set up up a base camp on Murphy Island which you are allowed to land camp on. From there we explored the fun grid of marsh islands.
    1 point
  30. That is a lot of windage. I’m not surprised they may have had anchor issues. The risk of dragging is much higher and you need a bigger anchor and more chain which is heavier and more awkward to handle. I think keeping a low profile has advantages. Cheers Peter HK
    1 point
  31. This is a great blog if you haven't seen it. Steve is a quiet but super nice guy I have met a few times. http://logofspartina.blogspot.com/?m=0 he sleeps in a bivy.
    1 point
  32. AGM are good batteries because they can be discharged deeper, and recharged faster, than traditional lead-acid types. But you pay for that extra performance. 'Lithium' covers a wide range of different chemistries. LiPo is very high energy density and is used in RC models and other high performance applications. But it's not considered safe enough for use on boats as they can go up in flames. The preferred Lithium battery type for boats is LiFePO4, which can be considered no more hazardous than lead-acid. Compared to lead-acid they are much, much lighter per Ah, and they can be discha
    1 point
  33. Thrillsbe, Re: Isn’t it fun to wear tee shirts and ski gear in the same month? Plenty of times I did some skiing ⛷ followed by a motorcycle 🏍 or bike 🚲 ride in the same day. That’s kinda fun.
    1 point
  34. I just got the wood, plans and epoxy for my boat build! I plan to read over the blue prints and watch some videos about building the boat and make myself familiar to it. And plan to start mid to end of January!! I can’t wait to get started!
    1 point
  35. Yep, "There is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." quote by Kenneth Grahame----and Graham Byrnes
    1 point
  36. Thanks for the welcome guys! I did take her out over the weekend and tested the new oars...those monsters are huge, that's for sure (about 11'1" long). I also did get my GPS connected and am pondering what type of installation I should do with it...most people do opt for the swing out of the companionway I suppose so they can use it in or out of the cabin..but I may need to look around at some other installations for inspiration before I commit to anything. Back to the oars, I contemplated cutting off 6 inches of the uppers because when I pulled them inboard more, they were much
    1 point
  37. Hi folks, this is my first post here and I just wanted to introduce myself as the new owner of Summer Breeze! After being a fan of the CS17mk3 for a while (but not having the time to build one myself) I finally talked Dale into selling SB to me and I'm happy that I was also able to read her whole build history here on this thread so I hope its ok to resurrect it after a year. Having access to Chick should be an interesting experience and quite bi-lateral since I'm a pretty active Internet/Social Media kind of guy myself so you can hear all about how SB will live on through my adventures. A
    1 point


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