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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/24/2021 in all areas

  1. Graham sent in this picture with the caption...”Missed it by only that much. Just 200 feet to deep water.”
    4 points
  2. Day 4 - Coinjock to North Landing RIver (27.2NM) Graham’s trek up the ICW continued with southerly winds that pushed him through Coinjock and past the Currituck Sound. A couple lines of thunderstorms swept through the area and around 3:30 Graham threw out the pick. I suspect the north winds arrived and he called it a day. That combined with the thunderstorms. Graham sent in this picture with the caption “second thunderstorm”. Graham reported earlier in the day that he was running with 2 reefs in the main and 1 in the mizzen. When asked about how his power system was holding up he said eve
    4 points
  3. If you have not had the opportunity to read Alan's story of his experience competing in the North Carolina Challenge do yourself a favor and go to this link. Alan's adventure in the 2021 NCC This was posted on the Watertribe Facebook page. Alan gives a detailed and humorous report of the race, including the reasoning behind deciding to spend 30 hours squeezed into a kayak and the stresses that places on a sailor. Also don't forget to keep up with Graham who is in the middle of his epic adventure sailing around the Delmarva peninsula.
    2 points
  4. I missed a few days but here is more copied over for those that haven't seen the latest. Day 6 (5/31) - Great Bridge Lock to Willoughby Bay (25 NM) Graham made good progress today into the Elizabeth River and past Norfolk finishing the day in the Hampton Roads area and anchoring in Willoughby bay. He has set himself up for crossing the Chesapeake Bay tomorrow to Cape Charles which is just over 24 NM straight across the bay. He has south east winds forecast switching to south west later in the day and should make good progress across with sunny weather and highs in the upper
    2 points
  5. I built mine with the forward sliding hatch and we have been happy with it. It slides on starboard slides in pieces of B&B sail track. We have had it out in pretty rough weather and hasn’t leaked and it is large enough for me to wiggle through…….but Carol is the usual anchor deployment crew.
    2 points
  6. I hated to take the time during sailing season, but all of Amos's points are good ones, and the only negative is the lack of "scoop" effect. I'll rig up some kind of canvas alternative to keep the breeze all night, even in rain as the previous hatch did. I am much further along, but here is an early pic. I made two rails and the plywood hatches and fit them nicely. They slide real good. I imagined myself forward working the anchor, moving my down-haul, tying reefs, and that seems really great. My tip up hatch made that difficult as un-dogging it took too long and it tipping up into the sail p
    2 points
  7. Amos, RIght on. I spoke with him earlier today and he said it got pretty sporty running wing and wing toward the entrance to the North River and he let his halyards go a bit and just let the sails slide down to reduce sail as it was too lumpy to reef properly and he was so close to being in the more sheltered river. He's been making great progress today with 2 reefs in the main and 1 in the mizzen earlier through Coinjock and he's trying to make as much progress toward the Chesapeake canal before the wind goes north. Even though this is a pleasure cruise it always feels like we're racing
    2 points
  8. Jay, Probably the easiest/safest place is the marina at Puerto Escondido which is about 1/2 mile from where I have my current mooring, and 20 miles South of Loreto. They are a " world class" facility with every amenity one would want. First world pricing, but they are also the ONLY marina within a few hundred miles...On site facilities for car/van storage,etc. Berthing at a pier is pricier than using one of their mooring balls, but then you need a dinghy to get back/forth from the boat. Next closest place with facilities is La Paz (200 miles to the South) which is a very large city/
    2 points
  9. Graham might have taken his upgrades a bit too far this time. What do you think? He's installed a big barn door rudder too and a giant boom..... Ok maybe I had you going? We all know Graham is a tiller man. Someone who thinks he's funny plopped this in Carlita's cockpit. Graham looked pretty worried when he came in last week and we told him we had "done some work on his boat".
    2 points
  10. In the past, I’ve used vinegar. But the word on the street is that it also allows some penetration. Waterless hand cleaner is the safest, and is readily available.
    1 point
  11. @Hirilonde— I think part of the prep is a wipe-down with acetone, right?
    1 point
  12. I think it's possible to get a good drawing sail yourself, but I'm with Thrillsbe on that subject. By the time you buy the materials, it's about as cheap to buy one and the B & B sails are great. As for the keel, both Skeena and Suzy J have White Oak keels. Tough as nails, closed cell wood great for this application. The rub is that being closed cell they don't glue great, but I have a cheap blade for my table saw with a bent tooth. It makes a great glue surface and I've never had a problem. The rest of the boats bits are SYP from lowes, like Paul said, culled from sorting over many visit
    1 point
  13. Thanks Jeff. I can get hold of some quite cheap so will go with it. a few photos below of what I’m up to. My first boat build so keeping to a little pack canoe about 12’ long.
    1 point
  14. @Hirilonde— say what you will, but this is a teal. I think Mark’s building a CS20 mk3. LOL I sure hope Hirilonde has a sense of humor!
    1 point
  15. Circumnavigating the Delmarva Peninsula has been on my bucket list for a long time. Ever since my first road trip to the area on a cold fall day about 30 years ago, looking out across the marshes and sounds teeming with migrating birdlife, trying to see round the next bend only to be denied by the road leaving the water, I knew that I needed to come back one day in my own boat. Carlita may not seem like the ideal boat for this but when you look into it a little deeper, she may be more ideal than you might think. Shoal water abounds allowing greater exploration, being able to sail in 6-8”
    1 point
  16. After reading this, it looks like I need to pack my battery-operated chain saw in with my cruising gear. LOL
    1 point
  17. Don- I watched the video, skipping ahead in places. I used Alexseal on Rosie with very good results without the magic additive. They seem to be on the cutting edge with this stuff. How geeky can we be? Watching videos of paint drying?? Ken
    1 point
  18. @Mark Rendelman— Here in the Appalachian foothills of North Carolina, we have more Darryls than Dougs. “Tulip Poplar”, which is actually a Tuliptree, is very prolific. It is cheap and straight-grained. I might play with it, unless I can snag a couple of those Sitka 2x6’s.
    1 point
  19. Every time I think OK now Graham is going to head outside I come back later and see that Carlita has wiggled past some narrow spot and is still meandering through all sorts of interesting places. Is there a way to capture Graham's waypoints for future reference? Some commentary or photos, trip report would be incredibly interesting. Some how I had forgotten about the trip report link!!!! What a treasure drove. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1osGfp6a4ErMMAfuJg40ViiUsHf77PFLvF4oaW8H8OXk/edit
    1 point
  20. Hello everyone and good sailing! been making some progress got the floor glued in got the hatch covers installed then went to installing the mizzenmast tabernacle. I did make a small error by installing the base of the tabernacle first this did lead to a little more effort in getting the mast angle and offset correct, once I feel comfortable with the numbers I will install it permanently
    1 point
  21. Ready for paint! Once I figured out which technique I wanted to use the sewing went pretty fast. It’s amazing how much it will smooth out and tighten when you run a hot iron over the polyester.
    1 point
  22. Thanks much everyone, as we all know, Graham designs wonderful boats! Just want to do his vision justice.
    1 point
  23. Finished the electrical system, chart table, and galley! Satisfied to see the Raspberry boot up properly. Countertops are Stonecoat, an epoxy with glitter and some color details. Shiny! now I am absolutely out of excuses not to start painting outside…./..
    1 point
  24. Busy day in the shop today made my steam generator so I could steam bend the forward end of the rub rail after 45min I took the bag off and the wood was soft enough to bend around the hull contur
    1 point
  25. Hi Don, I built s/n#2 and used a ski boat ballast pump, it is plumbed up with 1/2 pvc with the intake as far forward in the tank as possible. I had some concerns of mud and gunk getting into the tank being hard to clean but that hasn’t been much of a problem. We have been inspected several times but no problem with water being in the ballast tank. The pump gets all but a qt or so out, then if I want to really dry the tank out I use a sponge and jack the front of the trailer up to get the little water left to sponge out. When the boat is stored we leave the hatch cover off and I guess evap
    1 point
  26. I can't get enough of this thread/document/spot track. If you bring up google earth next to the spot track, you can click on images and get a feel for what Graham is going through. I'll bet it is a birders dream. I'm particularly interested in seeing what happens as he continues north. This shallow water seems perfect for Carlita. I'm not far away from retirement and could see doing this trip. I'm glad to have someone with Graham's experience lead the way.
    1 point
  27. Reacher, I would enjoy taking a drive over to Marinette some day this summer to meet you and see your boat. You’re about 2 1/2 hours from my home... about the same distance I drove to meet Thrillsbe (while on vacation in North Carolina last month) and to see his naval yard... (driveway).
    1 point
  28. Thanks for the offer--I'm only 97 miles from Marinette as the crow flies. How ironic that the complicating factor in me getting over there to see a boat would be a large body of water ...
    1 point
  29. I am building a cs mk3 hull #24 the cost of the kit is just the beginning it is not a hard build but it is challenging and it takes quite a bit of room to build and have room to move around , this boat is costly in the end you will put in many hours but the out come is well worth it
    1 point
  30. I'll second David's advice. I don't think a strip of fibreglass over the top would solve the problem. A piece glued to the bottom of the seat, covering the split area by at least a few inches, would be your best option. Then, perhaps you could send back the top of the seat, scrape out along the crack to open it up a bit more, wet it with epoxy, and then fill it with a fairly runny mix of thickened epoxy. Wait an hour or two, and scrape off any excess so that you don't have to sand it off later. You might need to repeat the process, perhaps with some sanding filler instead of a glue fill
    1 point
  31. Thanks Graham, I appreciate the tips and the encouragement. I'm sure you have noticed I'm loving building this boat. Over time, I have realized (accepted) that it's not really a "project" at all, but a hobby, which makes it more fun for me. Apparently you're on Carlita's Next Adventure just now. You seem to be a guy in the right place in life to do some of the things you've wanted to do for a long time and still have the motivation and ability to do them. Good for you and good luck on those adventures. That's a nifty little inspection glass you've made f
    1 point
  32. Day 5 - Arrived at Great Bridge Lock and met some friends (11.5NM) Graham made it to Great Bridge Lock today and was met up by Steve Early of Log of Spartina as well as our very own Amos Swogger, builder and owner of Core Sound 20 Mark 3 #11 ‘Larissa’ who both live near the area. Steve took some great (as usual) photos of Graham coming in. (photo: Steve Early) (photo: Steve Early) Below, Graham motors under Battlefield Blvd bridge on the ICW (photo: Steve Early) Graham headed West on the ICW in the Chesapeake Canal.
    1 point
  33. FROG!! Still have to paint and mount the top two coaming rings but other than that it’s ready to seal the wood. Not completely sold on my hatches but they are standard 8 and 10 inch sized so I can add commercial ones later if need be.
    1 point
  34. Makes me want to build one. So many boats, so little time!
    1 point
  35. Yes, a well written article from 2008. Seems to be accurate too. The Core Sound Series - Small Boats Magazine (smallboatsmonthly.com)
    1 point
  36. Amos, I'll be sure to let him know. He did not take a laptop on the trip so I don't know how much forum reading he will do. He called me today and I hope to get daily reports. Coped from the Log I've been keeping for him.... Day 2 - Pungo River to The Frying Pan (31nm) Graham got underway from the Pungo RIver at about 8am and looks to be either motoring or sailing through the alligator river canal. At 2pm Graham reported that the winds were light and he’d been motoring along. He had a hard time starting the outboard until he remembered Chick’s trick to blow int
    1 point
  37. Sorry I haven't posted for a while, intermittent progress! However all the planking is on, can't say I'm entirely happy with my efforts, but newbie builder, so a whole lot of learning going on.
    1 point
  38. Those channels are pretty slick.
    1 point
  39. The order one does things in sure can make a difference.
    1 point
  40. We got out on the water again on Sunday. Still not a great deal of wind, but more than the first sail... The photo shows how I store the booms whilst the sails are furled. The snotters are released until the head of the booms are below the foot of the sail, and then the sails are furled, and then the boom is held to the mast by the shock-cord equivalent of a soft shackle. Here's some footage of us (slowly) sailing around another boat on the lake... Cheers, Peter
    1 point
  41. Block plane and hand sanding......................
    1 point
  42. @Hirilonde— I guess you actually could tie them to the sprit. Mine are laced on, so I don’t know about that stuff. I know Peter has sleeves. I was just thinking about the advantages of the wishboom. I always liked how the sail on a Nonesuch would drop into a sort of net slung below the wishboom.
    1 point
  43. The rain keeps the pollen down, so I varnished. The owner picks her up Memorial Day Weekend. IMG_3699.MOV
    1 point
  44. I used a similar product on my CS17, called Coppaboat (Australian product) The application was fairly easy. The epoxy copper mix needed to be stirred before loading the paint roller each time, as the copper powder is so heavy it quickly drops to the bottom of the paint tray. Then once cured it was burnished to expose the copper particles. So far it seems good, just needs a wipe with a sponge once a month to remove any slime. The Mathew Flinders looks like being a really capable boat, great build.
    1 point
  45. Thank you very much for your answer, Mr. Graham. In the past, I would have talked with our friend Buck about these design intricacies over lunch (since I fed him nearly every day of the week) ... but none of us have that pleasure any more. It, apparently, is more optical illusion than anything else. I can't imagine a better example than what Len has produced. Thank you for your information.
    1 point
  46. Don't force it----get a BIGGER HAMMER!
    1 point
  47. I found that in this website, you put photos between the text... Add some text (maybe an extra return or two to have a little “working room” at the bottom of the editor.) Add a photo or batch of photos. Place the cursor where you want a photo that you loaded to be placed. Hit the “+” button on the bottom left corner of your photo... And there it is. I’ve noticed that photos not placed specifically in the post will appear as a run-together batch at the end of the text (like your previous post.) I usually add a return between and after
    1 point
  48. Well, I’ve completed the mock-up, and was successful. I’m going ahead with the process on the boat, and I’ll get to that. But let me show you the key steps in the process. I still don’t know how to put text between the photos, so the text all appears first. 1) apply fiberglass to the separate panels with epoxy. 2) apply a second coat while the first is still green. Sand smooth. 3) join the panels with an epoxy fillet, and let it cure. 4) sand the fillet smooth. 5) cut a 3” wide strip of “tape” out of some 6 oz glass cloth. DO NOT use a roll of glass tape! Saturat
    1 point
  49. I believe longboards are supposed to flex, and conform to the curvature of the hill. A 1/4” x4” board might be a better choice.
    1 point
  50. Nothing beats looking at a hull that has been so tediously faired and sanded by someone else.
    1 point


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