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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/28/2020 in all areas

  1. It was Labor Day weekend 2008 when she first kissed saltwater. 12 years later and I am more in love with her.
    2 points
  2. The weakest link on all of my boats has always been the skipper.
    2 points
  3. Anyone wanting to know how this boats attitude is on the water this video was taken from 15 feet away and the only thing you can hear is the water with a 40 hp honda on the back . I now have over 1800 miles on this boat and she got me home through a few good 30 mile an hr blows with 4 foot chop and higher . Cheap on fuel even at cruse of 23 -25 miles an hr with a full crew of 4 adults . My hats off to the designer . received_357335405454719.mp4
    2 points
  4. Hi Guys- Some of you have followed my build of Rosie, an Outer Banks 26. After all of the time and effort put into her creation it has been such a pleasure to spend lots of time aboard this Summer. Luanne and I would head out for 2-4 nights most weeks exploring the wonderful cruising grounds in our own back yard, the Gulf Islands. Some of the places we would anchor in were less than 10 miles from our home. We recently decided to go further afield and head up to Desolation Sound for a couple of weeks. In normal years the beautiful anchorages up there are crowded with large yachts coming from
    1 point
  5. In case anybody’s actually following this build, I’m here to say that I have applied my second coat of white on the interior. I’m using Devthane, an industrial two-part polyurethane. It cost as much as Interlux Perfection, except the you get a gallon for your $80 instead of a quart.
    1 point
  6. While there are rare couples that paddle well together, tandem boats are called "divorce boats" for good reason. Decades ago, I bought my first canoe from a woman who was recently divorced. He really liked boating. She did not. One of the joys of solo kayaking or canoeing is the feeling of controlling your own boat. And you can paddle along with other folks, each in their own boat. Also remember that primary stability is just that. Secondary stability is what actually increases the probability of avoiding a swim. Fair winds!
    1 point
  7. At least it's easier than adding to the length. (Don't ask me how I know that!)
    1 point
  8. Looks Great! Wishing you all fun and safe adventures. R
    1 point
  9. Your rigging time will drop dramatically soon. It took me 1.5 hrs the first time; now it is down to 25 minutes (CS 20.3). It is always fun sailing a new boat with company aboard. Glad to see it went well. Impressive to see how well the boat handled that many people aboard.
    1 point
  10. A Sportier Sailing Today Today was my third sailing of the Norma T. I plan to sail each day this week and weekend; the weather looks consistent. This time I went to a lake about 8 miles north (a larger flowage on the Wisconsin River well suited for sailing... there is even a sailing club on the lake.) Winds were more lively today than my first two sailings. I’ll attempt to exploit this nice fall weather... after all, I already purchased my season passes for alpine skiing so the seasons will be changing soon. Today, for the first time, my wife joined me, along with three neig
    1 point
  11. First Day Sailing the Norma T I did a few more things this morning to ready the boat for the road... don’t want to lose a mast or something else. I decided to use my little Toyota Yaris as tow vehicle. It pulls the boat just fine, even out of the water at the landing, and probably gives other drivers a chuckle to see such a silly car doing this. The Wisconsin River flows through our town and the flowage should be big enough for some sailing. I rarely see sailboats here, but hey, it’s available and convenient. There is another good sized flowage that many u
    1 point
  12. @lenm the teak floor and covering boards look great. Hope you plan on keeping them this honey color for years to come.
    1 point
  13. Edging closer to completion with final fairing about 95% done. Off to the painters soon as I don't want to spray toxic products outside the bedroom window. After covering up all of the wood with fibreglass and filler, it will be nice to bring some of the look back - in the form of a teak deck. To minimise weight, we are going with 7mm rebated planks epoxyied to the deck. Front decks will be a simple non skid finish to save weight. I ruled out using cork as I was quoted prices close to teak.
    1 point
  14. Like Peter I have used the flame method but I did not realize that pipe glue was compatible with epoxy. When running PVC wire chases I used to just rough up the surface where I need to bond and glass the back side to the frame or bulkhead and have the PVC stand out far enough to get a nice fillet all around the pipe. The object was to waterproof the joint as the PVC passing through the frame and mechanically connected to the glass had more strength than it needed.
    1 point
  15. You might find this link useful https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php/bonding-pvc-plastic-with-epoxy/ I've used the flame method in the past with success so far - 17 years. Cheers Peter HK
    1 point
  16. We have gotten into similar discussions before. Another one is the weight of adding glass sheathing to boats that don't require it. What is a lot? What is too much? I want all of of my boats to be as fast and light weight as possible. For me, anything is a lot. I can plane my Lapwing and Spindrift solo. I wouldn't sacrifice any ability to do that for anything. Damned because it is all related.
    1 point
  17. We're talking about 3 inches here so it won't make a lot of difference to the heeling moment. You can always not hoist the sail the last 3 inches and it will be as designed. In theory in light airs it may be beneficial to get a little higher above the boundary layer into a stronger breeze - but we're only talking 3 inches. As to adding a healing force I'd do anything for that these days with the arthritis in my hand, back and shoulder🤣 Cheers Peter HK
    1 point
  18. Hi Jan, Can you hold off on the mast until I check the shop computer tomorrow. I was under the impression that the S12 mast plan was updated. My home computer is showing a mast that I updated in 09. We have gotten rid of the wood mast heel plug and replaced it with a plastic heel which changes the length of the aluminum sections.
    1 point
  19. It will add healing force to the boat. This will also make the boat slower as the wind picks up. I never find the head room an issue and I always liked going as fast as possible. To each his/her own.
    1 point
  20. Hello all, My son and I got a CS17 kit SIX years ago when he was in 8th grade. We had a few interveneing events that pushed the project back again and again. He's 19 now and the two of us are determined to FINISH THE BOAT. We have a lot done and a fair amount to do yet. The hull, trunk, bulkheads and benches, centerboard and rudder, are all done. The bottom is glassed and painted. and the cockpit has a coat of paint. So my list is: Decks, combings, rub rail, fore hatch, cockpit hatch covers, masts, tracks, and glass tubes, sprits, tiller, set the centerboard and
    1 point
  21. I had my car in the garage once...
    1 point
  22. I wrapped mine and at the green stage measured with calipers. I added an extra wrap or two until I was just a bit over. The I took my orbital sander and brought it into a nice snug fit by laying the tube on a flat bench and rolling while I sanded. Very easy and it came out really nice.
    1 point
  23. Keep the car in the garage???? May it never be! Besides, by now you should have been infected by the boat building bug.
    1 point
  24. I did not mean to imply that a tabernacle is necessary. My attraction to the tabernacle has more to do with shoulder rotator cuff troubles and plans to sail into my dotage. One of Alan's videos on the CS15? shows the tabernacle under construction. Doesn't look like too much work if you haven't installed the deck yet.
    1 point
  25. Justin Long long time ago in a galaxy far far away I bought a starter kit from a company called CST and I think they are located in Tehachapi California but you can make up your own, to stick the bag down you can use the butyl tape used for bedding hardware the bag was just a piece of painters drop cloth the white looking stuff is bleeder cloth this allows even draw down of the bag you can use thin quilt batting and the hose is 1/4” vacuum hose you also need to put down peel ply you can use taffeta the stuff I had is Teflon coated and of course you need a vacuum pump the one I used cam
    1 point
  26. I will be having my second grandchild in February. Time for their first boat.
    1 point
  27. All muscle Don. Nate has been known to carry 2 or 3 sheets of 3/4 ply around under each arm to keep things interesting.
    1 point

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