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  1. After all the priming an sanding I couldn’t figure out a reasonable way to paint all in one shot. So I painted the hull, will give the paint a day or two to get used to not being in a can, then drape the hull then shoot the deckhouse.
    3 points
  2. Rob, Congratulations. It is definitely a S10. It was built from scratch, not a kit but it looks like the builder did a good job. We will give you the plan sheets that you need to finish her off, just email or give us a call.
    2 points
  3. Re:7 Maybe I had too many of my kids aboard… but I was the photo-taker (last fall) leaning back on the transom in my CS15. I’d think five more feet could make it possible for a couple more of the family. I really like the openness and space of this boat.
    2 points
  4. Sail shape is the key to this. Battens play a much larger role than just supporting extra sail area.
    1 point
  5. https://towndock.net/news/tom-lathrop
    1 point
  6. Thanks Dave, Challenge is to find a small efficient waterproof (and not too $$$) solar panel/charger that will keep maybe a small 5ah lithium battery charged for the pump. Boat doesn't leak yet, just worry heavy rain, until I can have a proper cover made that I can easily set and remove from one side from the dock. R
    1 point
  7. Well, you could, um, errr, build a Spindrift. In all seriousness, it isn't just the 9% more sail area. It is significantly better sail shape. It's all a compromise, and your damned because it is all related.
    1 point
  8. Can confirm that at about 8 knots of wind, the hoisted boom and sail act as a rather uncomfortable parachute. So that idea is out. I did reuse the little D-ring I was using to experiment with the topping lift into a sleeve zipper helper of sorts. Basically a loop of line that ties to the zipper puller and goes up to the mast head. I just ran it down to the front of the boat, but I'd probably put it through some redirects to end up somewhere near the daggerboard case. Made it much simpler to drop the sail (though I can't use the bottom sail attachment snap, and I will probably want to have some kind of additional stopper at the head of the sail to prevent it going off completely). With the sail unzipped, it lowers quite nicely. I'll have to see how it behaves down on the water. I think between the sail unzipping and coming down and a topping lift keeping the boom from causing too much trouble, I should be able to tidily lash the sail to the boom and row. Maybe. Will experiment and report back.
    1 point
  9. I haven't sailed as much this summer as I wish. Work and weather have conspired against me. The few times I did get out I got a bit too much sun. And I had my son Andrew sleep on the aft seats one night on Conesus Lake and in the morning the dew was so heavy it looked like it rained on his sleeping bag. I had decided not to put in a dodger as others have. I just don't sail in weather that dictates one. But at anchor shade is desirable and protection from rain and dew more so. I played around with some awning ideas and here is what I came up with. My son Teddy sewed it up for me. He left for his second year of college at Clarkson University, all I had to do was string it up. It allows me to leave the companionway hatch open at night and also keeps the dew off the seats forward of the mizzen mast. There are three poles that give it shape. It pops up in a couple of minutes and the poles are just shock corded tent poles. It folds up to about the size of a shoe-box. It can be rolled up assembled with the tent poles in and shoved below or strapped to the cabin top. I'm pretty happy with it. It will be nice to have some shade later in the day at anchor. It can also be strung low in the front if the rain is driving. Negatives: It does shade the solar panel, but my 50 watt panel seems to give me more juice than I need and the sunny times of the day I'll be sailing. Also, it will be interesting to see how it affects hunting at anchor. The good news is yesterday we had 20 knot winds and I left it strung up in the yard and it didn't seem to mind. If the weather cooperates, I'm planning to take a week off and sail the Chesapeake the last week in September, sailing to the MASCF in St Michaels. Hope to see you there! Take Care, Steve
    1 point
  10. Good sail. Now I have a homework assignment for your next sail. Put the boat on a reach and try to make her steer herself while you are waiting for the steward to serve up your meal. The tools that will have are, main and mizzen sheets, centerboard rake, rudder adjustment using your tiller tamer and moving crew weight fore and aft or athwartships. Pick a land mark to aim for. Remember tightening the mizzen sheet will bring her up and tightening the main will make her bear away. Moving the crew weight forward will bring her up and aft will do the opposite. Obviously if conditions are shifty it may be not worth the trouble. When you get her close to steering herself, the adjustments will be very slight.
    1 point
  11. Very interesting learning experience. At least you'll have a robust boat that can't rot. That was one of the attractions of composites for me, but cost and lack of experience/skills swung it the other way.
    1 point
  12. Today’s Longer Sailing Mini-Adventure As stated in the above post, I planned to sail this afternoon, going a longer distance than I have done so far. I didn’t get to the lake until 3:15 pm and I wanted to be sure to get back to the landing again before dusk. I decided to go upwind most of the way to the “top” of the lake, perhaps turning back a bit before the end, depending on time. Since I hadn’t eaten lunch and I’d sail past “supper time” I sent the quartermaster to procure sufficient provisions. Yes, I often pull my boat around with my little Toyota Yaris. I managed to rig everything for launch within ten minutes. I even got the new “pig stick” up the main mast, flying a red ribbon (wind gauge ?). I tried making a little video showing how easily the boat now comes off the trailer with the roller bunkers. I was having to hold the boat back from rolling off with one hand while fumbling with my phone using the other hand. I thought it would roll all the way off on its own like usual but I needed to give it a small tug from the dock. It’s LOTS easier than the padded bunks. I got underway, motored out a bit, raised the sails, neatened the lines somewhat, and started beating my way up the lake. The weather changed from damp and cloudy to being a very nice late afternoon. I also started a new freebie sailing app called Waterspeed that I had downloaded to my IPhone. (I later decided to upgrade it for a year… I think I like it.) At first, I was experiencing a strong weather helm. Hmmm… it didn’t seem typical to have that kind of “pull” on the tiller. Then, I checked the rudder downhaul line… oops, a little loose. The helm balanced right up. And before I knew it, the steward was serving up a late lunch in the galley (half a sub.) It took over two hours to get to the top of the lake. With the tacking, it was over 7 miles. (I know that my sailing skills do not always provide the best speed and pointing into the wind, but I think my new app can help me learn.) I decided to round this most northern buoy and head back to the landing at the south end of the lake. And then the steward served dinner, the other half of my sub, while I was texting with my wife. What a nice surprise. The return trip was down wind and I did not tack even once the entire way. It’s my longest single run. I used a broad reach and wing-on-wing and things moved along quite well. It was a bit over an hour to return to the landing. The wind was definitely softening at 6:30 pm. Sometimes my ribbon looked like this: Mostly there was a good enough breeze… On my return trip, at one point of very soft wind the boat gently came to a complete stop and started pivoting around. (The lake has stumps and sandbars; I’ve tripped the centerboard cleat a couple times.) Yep, I grounded ?. That hasn’t happened to me yet. Raising the centerboard half way solved the issue. This is what my new app recorded for me: It was a very nice sail. The sailing club has a couple more events coming up… one more race night and a Saturday poker cruise (using the buoys for the poker cards… I think.) I’m looking forward to both.
    1 point
  13. I tried rowing my Spindrift with the sail and boom up over my head and I was not comfortable with the stability in any wind. I felt much better getting the sail down and out of the way. being able to easily remove the boom at the gooseneck was key. I acknowledge that it ain't pretty but for the few times I may want to lower the sail on the water it works for me. I can work my legs to the forward side of the thwart and from there reach the zipper luff. I believe I am keeping my weight far enough aft that the boat still feels stable. One of Pete's ideas for making it easier to lower the sail while remaining aft would make it easier, but this works well enough for me as I am usually sailing to shallow water and just stepping our prior to lowering the sail. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Nm9YuTBeWY
    1 point
  14. I’ll try brailing next time I get to the boat house. Might try incorporating it into the lift somehow. I may need to do something a little more flexible or compact on the gooseneck attachment though.
    1 point
  15. Hmmmm…. ?? Must… resist… wanting… this… boat!! Well, I’ll just look at the photos. ? ============================ I just went through the photos of build #1 of the SR20 (Graham’s link is above). Wow!! Wonderful workmanship on what I think is a sensational design for a family friendly daysailer… that likely could easily be used for camp cruising. This one has more appeal to MY interests than a cabin type accommodation and it gives a huge amount of cockpit roominess. Ok, I’m still not done with my second retirement boat build (I’m waiting on the marina’s installation work of controls, motor, etc.… c’mon, guys), and I vowed that I don’t need to do another boat-build. And, I’m REALLY happy with my CS15 that I built last year. My family loves it. But…. ? Well, maybe in some future. I know, I can name it after my wife. THAT would justify it don’t ya think? ?
    1 point
  16. Hi Andy B, We do indeed have a boat with everything that you asked for. We are currently calling it the SR20 for self righting. Hull #1 is finished and we hope that it will be sailing at the messabout in October. It was a difficult assignment and we went through many iterations to get it right. Here is a cutaway view. We previously updated the Bay River Skiff with the centerboard moved to the cockpit side and raised the freeboard to increase the down flooding angle. Travis sailed it in the Texas 200 and reported that it went very well. Here is a link to the build pictures. https://photos.app.goo.gl/74WXsZVnrM9mAXkv9
    1 point
  17. Hi Andy. A CS20 is much bigger than a Sea Pearl. 7 seems a lot on it though. But as your crew gets older the times you can get them all together will dwindle. It happens fast. Any CS is much more sable than a SP and people who went out with me once on WildCat and were uncomfortable with the tenderness have no problem on Skeena. Things I miss on my SP: Quick rigging. I'm still working to make launch faster but I don't think my CS can ever be as quick as the SP rig. Infinite reefing. The sail shape suffered, but I loved how you could dial in as much neutral or weather helm as you wanted by how many turns. The tenderness. People that grew up in canoes like me love Sea Pearls. Other didn't. Looks....it's subjective, but the SP was a pretty boat. Light wind ability. I sail with a lot of traditional boats. On light air days the SP would really shine. The rear Bimini. Hot days in the shade are superior. I haven't figured a solution for Skeena.... Things I don't miss. The Lee-boards. Tacking a Cat Ketch with a centerboard is just sort of a non-event.....nice! The tenderness. many of my passengers were not canoeists.... The center tent. Sleeping aboard was tight for one. I took each kid independently and suffered for it. Anchor rode storage. bringing the rode on deck and having the water run the length of the deck....ugh! Length. With the engine mount it's a pretty long package. Lack of pointing. The CS points much better, especially when reefed. A CS20 is a big project, but they do come up for sale once in awhile! Take Care, Steve
    1 point
  18. Chic I've seen your work before I built my Belhaven up close. and its second to none.
    1 point
  19. Great to see another Ocracoke on the water. beautiful job Lenny. She looks fantastic. Congratulations.
    1 point
  20. Now That I know how to add to thread all future posts will be here. Not much going on in the boat shop but I did manage to paint the bottom and install the keel strip.painting the side will be next, but before I do I must obtain a better paint respirator spraying the epoxy is as nasty as you can get. Also will be working on building a keel roller tray for the trailer.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. not sure if all this info belongs in the FROG section, But its the best I can do. I wanted to mention that I found trimming the fabric with a hot knife to be worth every penny. Not to mention it makes a very satisfying sound when cutting. The cutter used in the videos are the german manufactured hot knife that runs $200 plus! I found this one from Carolina knife Co. for $99 Bucks (plus $20 shipping)! hot_cut_knife It appears to be of good quality and sturdy. it doesn't have the led light to illuminate your work, but I didn't think it really needed one.
    1 point

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