Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/27/2023 in all areas

  1. Thanks all for the feedback and tips! I made some good progress this long weekend! I glasses all the hull seams, installed the forward bulkhead, and keel batten (with loads of squeeze out.)
    3 points
  2. If you have specific questions, take photos, and post them. There is no such thing as a stupid question on this forum. This rig is very familiar to most of us on this forum. Your biggest problem will be which person’s advice to choose!
    2 points
  3. The coaming support that I showed proudly in the post above failed a few weeks later. The epoxy didn't fail but it pulled off the surface layer of the wood of the gunwale and the coaming. Perhaps a message about hubris from the kayak gods. The 1st pic below shows the areas where the support pulled off. The 2nd pic shows the failed brace (left) and the new one designed to be lashed to the frame (right). The last pic shows the new brace lashed in place. I'll put the boat out on the lawn, see how the modification works, and report back.
    2 points
  4. G’day I use a jig saw with a laminate blade. It cuts Okoume really cleanly so I cut to the line, no finishing required. Also most panels are duplicated port & starboard so stack the plywood sheets & cut two panels at once. I marked out & cut all the hull panels & bulkheads for my CS17 in one day. cheers John
    1 point
  5. I used a worm drive Skill saw and left the lines. Then cleaned up the cuts with 6" disk and 36 grit paper. I made the two sides together and the bottoms together as mirror pieces. I have the plans with full size pattens. I'm painting and have no bright wood so it worked well for me.
    1 point
  6. Bosch cordless jigsaw then a block plane.
    1 point
  7. Looking good and bringing back memories. I did my tape like yours. I did slide my tape just a bit to reinforce the bolt holes, FWIW. I think that first pic is at the stern. I knife can clean that joint up quickly. You aren't getting any strength out of that gap. After you add your fill coats you can fair it if you are going to paint it. "Don't let perfection be the enemy of good". In the end, after you've used her, none of this will matter as long as she's solid. Take Care, Steve
    1 point
  8. Both gunwales are now bent-on and laminated! Next up, planing, and sanding them flush -- hopefully not too much of a chore, but the places that have epoxy squeeze out that I couldn't clean up will probably be annoying.
    1 point
  9. The Brooklin Boatyard uses Titebond III in many marine applications. I wouldn’t think of building a boat without my scarfing jig (7:1). You’re doing a fine job!
    1 point
  10. It always seems that those who are doing scarfing for the first time, or only do it once in a while say it is a pain and/or tedious. But once you have a jig, it is down right easy and fast. The rub rails on my Lapwing are 5 pieces each side. This meant I got to use up some small pieces of Teak.
    1 point
  11. Heres my fishing setup for my Bay River Skiff. I use my 2.5 hp Suzuki. I’d love to test out a 9.9…
    1 point
  12. Don Silsbe visited me last week and took Norma T out on my local lake to see how it sails. I sailed Avocet, my CS17m3, and tried out a third sail someone gave me… just experimenting. The winds were VERY light… not exciting but we had a nice time and got some photos. It’s the first time I had both boats sailing near each other to take photos. I made a little video of our afternoon:
    1 point
  13. I think that it is good idea to use your CS17 as a motor boat. We used my BRS15 a lot with a 6 hp motor without rudder and rig. With 3 adults, 2 large dogs and picnic gear she ran at 7 knots. Running solo and trimmed out it seemed a lot faster. We did not have Navionics then, It was generally hard to find an accurate measured distance on the spur of the moment. As best as I can calculate for your boat using a 10 hp motor. @ 600 # all up weight I get 10.3 knots and @ 1000# 8.9 knots. Take this for what it is worth because this is operating at hump speed and calculations can be way off. The ideal way would be to try and borrow a motor for a trial run.
    1 point
  14. Make the sprits longer than the plans call for. As specked, they are likely to come up short when you hump them tight. Someone else here had noted short sprits, so I made mine longer. In fact, they're still just barely long enough when I pull the sails flat. If I recall correctly, I made the mizzen sprit the length shown for the main, and the main correspondingly longer. I should go measure them for you, I guess. Alan or Graham may have updated measurements for you. Just occurred to me that this could be because I ordered the full leech sails rather than the pure triangles. Not sure at all. In any event, you can always cut them shorter. Just don't let the main sprit pull back so far it catches on the mizzen mast.
    1 point
  15. Bryan, defenitely repairable for another go folding. I'm out of town this weekend away from my pics from other builds but basically just glue the crack with epoxy and put a piece of glass over the crack inside and out and clamp nice and flat. At least half a dozen builders over the many years have sucessfully repaired from a crack during folding. Wait a few days before second attempt epoxy is still pretty flexible after 2 days. Full properties in about 7 days in my testing. I'd give it a full 72 hrs maybe a bit less if you apply some gentle heat. (Not more than 100 deg or so so). On the nesting bulkhead in this picture it looks like your ratchet stap is actually keeping the bottom from flattening. The chine edge needs to be able to extend past the corner of the bulkhead but the strap is holding it back. Instead just slide some boards under the keel at the bulkhead and support the keel at that point and the gap should easily close. That sounds like maybe what you were going to try next.
    1 point
  16. Here’s a quick report on our first year with the Ravenswood and Ravenswood LV. First, the light weight really pays off. I can’t say enough about how nice it is to be able to easily load a kayak onto the roof of a van with one person. The easier it is, the more you’ll use your kayak. Second, adding handles to both ends really helps with portaging. We’re able to load up and the carry them both in one trip, sometimes several hundred yards. Performance is really good. The speed and ability to handle waves and wind really inspires confidence. Finally, people always stop and ask about them so be prepared to answer questions. Here’s some kayak porn from Elevenmile Reservoir State Park in Colorado.
    1 point
  17. With purchasing Avocet (CS17m3) I got a great method to keep the doused mainsail nicely wrapped up at the height if the foot of the mainsail when it’s fully raised. For the mizzen, I use a second halyard attached to an eye around the half way point on the sprit and tie the sail t it in a nice bundle, again at least as high as the foot of the mizzen sail when up all the way. When I take the slack out if the sheets the sails are completely out of the way to board, motor, or just be anchored. Visibility is clear. At anchor in this photo my main is tied up and the mizzen is being a wind vane.
    1 point
  18. thanks all! Managed to get the bottom and sides folded up in the middle of all the 4th of July festivities. I left the keel wires a little too loose and will have to crawl under to tighten but feels good to have something in the garage that at least looks like a boat ️ !!
    1 point


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.