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  1. Amos, which takes longer, with or without help?
    4 points
  2. One can't over state the importance of a dry fit. I will even try a dry clamping if I have any doubt about the actual procedure to see if it works before I slobber everything with epoxy and find out my idea doesn't go together well.
    2 points
  3. We've been busy with projects on the big boat (annual engine service, dropping the mast for standing rigging replacement, re-coring the forward hatch, etc). Now we finally got the chance to move forward with the Spindrift. The big part was installing the mast step, and modifying the king plank for the Europe mast. Here's a test fit, the mast still needs to be shortened: As is traditional, we installed a coin in the mast step. The 2024 German two euro coin features the white cliffs of Königsstuhl. Very fitting, as it is often the last sight of Germany for us when we head out to sea... We aim to have the mast ready for the weekend. We should get an old Europe dinghy sail to modify then. Our oars also arrived. I would've ordered a little bit longer ones, but the Finnish company sadly only sells this model into Germany. But on the positive side, they fit perfectly inside the bow section.
    2 points
  4. Since I made the last post, I went to the MASCF and then I trailered Skeena to Amos's place near the start of the Dismal Swamp Canal. We went in tandem to the Messabout and it was so much fun I'm hoping to repeat it this year with maybe a modification of the route. I had promised a few people I'd write up the 2023 experience, but I've had some things going on at work that have taken all my time. I will get to it. I have moved into a house with really no place for a workshop while my wife and I are working with an architect to design another house that will be built over the next year suitable to our retirement. I feel like I have another boat in me. But this means my ability to modify Skeena has been limited. This morning, while it was snowing, I attached cleats to the cabin top like I saw on Amos's Larissa. I also added a table below which is really going to be a nice addition. I'm getting close to retirement, but for now there are times when it will be necessary to work and laptops aren't that great in your lap. The table top uses this mechanism: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09H7J9KQL/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I need to build a tabletop at a friends who has a shop, but I installed the mechanism and made a thick carboard temporary top and I think this is going to be a nice addition for day I'm stuck below. The neat part is it can be easily removed and stowed. One other thing I'm doing is adding a bigger outboard with reverse. The 2.5 Suzuki I have has plenty of power, but reverse would be so nice. Unfortunately my custom motor mount which works perfect with my 2.5 doesn't work with the Suzuki 6 I purchased. FTR, the 4 was the same weight/size so I went bigger. I'll be adding an extension to the current mount. If anyone with a setup like this posts a picture for R & D purposes, I'd be much obliged. Take Care, Steve
    2 points
  5. I ended up with 4 coats of graphite epoxy on the bottom of the Duckworks Scout I built last summer. (Sorry all, non-B&B product.) I was impressed with the way it held up to Door County Rocks and miscellaneous driveway scuffs. It certainly is better than scuffing through enamel and revealing primer or glass. I did some sanding with 320 between coats to get it smooth and glossy the way I wanted. I recommend it. But no studies.
    2 points
  6. This is just a heads up. I found a band new Suzuki 2.5d5s short shaft for sale for $685 at Boat Max Online. Free shipping too! I have been watching the price and this has been the best I've seen. Suzuki Outboard Team had the same price. I bought one and hope to see it delivered by next week.
    2 points
  7. While leaving things bright would be pretty, this is going to be a working dinghy. So the easier maintenance, the better. We also replaced the (old, leaky) teak deck on our boat with paint, so I guess we're just savages. Here's the first coat of Perfection. Second will go on soon:
    2 points
  8. This is the way Peter McCrary did the top of his mast. As he points out it makes nesting the mast sections doable. I copied his idea and it works well. Here are a couple of photos. This pulley arrangement is an alternative to a cheek block at the head of the smallest mast section — which would prevent “nesting” of that section into the middle section of the mast assembly.
    2 points
  9. This morning a 39kt wind was pushing all of the ice in the bay into our marina and making a lot of noise. Since it was raining, we started the day inside by planing the gunwales. Luckily the rain ended, and we were able to move the boat outside for sanding. First time this was possible, as the boat wouldn't fit out through the door in one piece. We rounded the gunwales and shaped the bow curvature. While we had the router out, we also opened the hole for the daggerboard. Back inside we added fiberglass tape to the outer seams of the nesting bulkheads. The boat is looking so much more together now with the gunwales in correct shape! I'll try to secure us a mast tonight. Fingers crossed.
    2 points
  10. I built birdsmouth masts for my Lapwing. They certainly add to the show boat effect, and it was very satisfying to complete them, but I would never use the word fun. Making the tapered staves and gluing all 8 of them together at the same time can only be described as tedious. Making them round was extremely satisfying. I find the word "fun" does not apply here.
    2 points
  11. Sometimes I wish I was on a tight schedule so I'd have an excuse to stop fairing! Got the boat outside to more easily clean off the amine blush, as well as fit the mast step (can't get the first mast section to fit inside the garage). It was actually pretty satisfying to hear water sloshing around inside the dinghy for the first time. Made me excited for when we get it out there for the first time. Mast step epoxied in place: Back in the garage I spent a solid day sanding. I've really about had it with the Total Boat epoxy for coating work. It does say that it's not designed for finish work, but it's hard to decipher for what reason exactly. In my experience though, it has a tendency to bead up more easily, and doesn't self-level as well. Here's an example of the sorts of imperfections I'm still left at in places after sanding. I didn't want to sand them completely out yet since I think I'll burn through the adjacent areas in the process. I decided to do another coat of epoxy. Partially because I sanded so much of the other ones off, but mostly because I wanted to reduce the imperfections as much as possible before switching to fairing compound, if that's what I decide to do. Luckily, I have some Resin Research epoxy from a few surfboards I built. This stuff is designed for finish coats and you can add a bit of xylene (they call it Additive F) to it to improve it's self-leveling qualities (at least I think that's what it does). I figured I might as well give it a shot. I think the result came out a lot better already, though it hasn't yet cured. I think maybe one problem I was having with the total boat epoxy is my own fault though. I was using a tack-cloth as my final prep step, and I think this is a mistake. I think some of the wax in the tack cloth contaminates the surface. I should have followed the tack cloth with an acetone wipe down.
    1 point
  12. Great work Don, your fiberglass work is impressive.
    1 point
  13. I have always used West for graphite powder. I would imagine that graphite is graphite. I had a friend that was a kayak buillder/designer and he emptied toner cartdridges and used the powder. His boats did fine.
    1 point
  14. That’s looking great! I wish we had the time for a couple of more rounds of fairing. Oh well, whenever the boat needs a repaint…
    1 point
  15. Having the graphite powder in epoxy gives great UV protection and I think provides a smooth low friction surface. I have a Devlin Cackler I built in 99 and the bottom looks almost as good as when launched. Used about once a week since beginning. And I have a pirogue stored upside down and the bow gets sun maybe 6 hours a day and looks fine.
    1 point
  16. Great job, I like that bright fendering! Thank you for weighing the boat, so few builders report back their weights.
    1 point
  17. That has to be one of the fastest builds I've seen. Well done. If you think rowing is fun, wait until you get your rig sorted
    1 point
  18. Today we got to do the first "production" trip with the dinghy. We rowed across the bay to fetch our mainsail back from the sailmaker. The oars kind of suck, but otherwise the boat is going fine! We should get the new oars sometime next week. After we got the sail back to the big boat, we took a thermos of soup and another of tea with us and went for a short exploration of our home bay. We stopped at a mooring ball of a neighboring sailing club for lunch. While figuring out the lifting arrangements and the best way to assemble the dinghy on board (standing on the transom seems to work well), we also took the chance to measure the weight of the dinghy: 14kg for the bow section 22.5kg for the stern section So 36.5kg (80lbs) for the whole dinghy We did this with a luggage scale, so precision won't be amazing. But that sits right inside the 34-41kg window stated by B&B, so seems about right.
    1 point
  19. So, the gale died down a bit earlier than anticipated. So we took the chance to take the boat out of the club restaurant. And you know what, it swims! We took the dinghy out for a short spin, first solo: And then also with two on board. Works! Then the most important test of all, how is it to hoist the boat on deck, and will it fit? It does! I think we should build an a-frame that plugs in the rudder gudgeons and supports the dinghy. And couple more pad eyes to keep it in place. It doesn't even block the sight forward too badly (especially if you imagine the second dinghy gone): Tomorrow for more sea trials / dinghy adventures...
    1 point
  20. It's been very windy this last few days, but also quite warm. This meant that we could do some projects on the big boat while waiting for the paint to harden on the Spindrift. Today we decided to finally install some of the hardware. The oar locks went on. We also installed the rudder gudgeons. The inspection hatches went on with some Sikaflex. It looks like we can finally splash the boat on Thursday. The wind should quiet before then. We didn't receive our new oars yet, so we'll have to start with the tiny aluminium ones from our banana-boot. But that'll be enough for some first sea trials.
    1 point
  21. How’s that boat build coming, Richard?
    1 point
  22. Due to time constraints, we’ve had to race ahead getting the hull ready, at the expense of all the detachable parts. We have access to the woodworking workshop at the c-base hackerspace. It is about an hour away with public transport, so not really viable for transporting the entire hull, but we can build smaller stuff like the daggerboard there. For rudder, we have a garage find kick-up rudder from some long-gone dinghy. Seems to be about the right size, so at least in the beginning we’ll go with that. Needs a tiller, though. We still also need to finish the thwart, and start figuring out how to get the Europe dinghy mast cut in two and fitted with the boat. Perfection is now fully on. We also ordered a stainless steel strip to be mounted on the keel. It looks like the hardware will be two-tone: bronze on the inside, steel on the outside.
    1 point
  23. We’ll try to give the paint as much time as we can. The primary problem is that we’ll have to get out of the workspace by Monday, and the fire hose needs to go on before that (since we need epoxy temperature for filling the nail holes). Looks like next week is pretty nasty weather. Forecast has heavy rain and 6-8bft. Not the weather for trying the dinghy for the first time! So we’ll try to find a place to stash the boat without nesting it for the time. Anyway, first coat of Perfection went on the outer hulls this morning.
    1 point
  24. I was at a chandlery yesterday to pick up the rudder gudgeons. They had a row of A part Perfection cans on the shelf, so we chatted a bit. They said that the product has been a bit of a nightmare for them due to the B part going bad so easily - lots of warehousing losses. So they're not sad to see the product go away. In other news, we flipped the boat this morning and started on the bottom hulls.
    1 point
  25. The primer is InterProtect. Now followed by Perfection Undercoat:
    1 point
  26. Our plan is to splice dyneema strops in all the four holes, sort of like a soft pad eye.
    1 point
  27. I left the corners at the mating bulkheads round. As a tender, my Spindrift was going to be banged around a bit, and sharp corners damage easily. And sharp corners damage me easily
    1 point
  28. My method was to use thin but stiff plastic (I used laminated sheets of paper) inserted in to the gap between the two halves, and sticking out by an inch or so. Where the two halves meet there is a slight radius and it looks better if this is filled, so the plastic gives you an edge to work to. I used microfibres and was a little generous, over filling slightly. After it had cured, I removed the plastic and then carefully sanded the filled area to ensure that it was a perfect match both sides. I was really pleased with how this turned out, with a really good crisp edge and almost invisible join line.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. This morning we sanded the outsides of the hulls in preparation for glassing. In the evening we cleaned the hull with acetone and cut the glass for the outside hulls (five pieces in total) Then it was "just" a question of applying the glass and the three coats of epoxy. Now we've slightly exceeded our epoxy budget. We've used about 13kg of the stuff. Luckily there isn't that much left to glue and/or paint. This weekend we're on a celestial navigation course, so there won't be a lot of progress on the dinghy.
    1 point
  31. A messy shop means work is getting done. A badge of honor. Besides, I hate cleaning it.
    1 point
  32. Jay- The only way to prove you wrong, and you are on this, is to have you visit and see the mess for yourself.
    1 point
  33. Just make sure you tell him that a "sky hook" works best with shore line
    1 point
  34. @Captain Tim— I introduced him to the concept of a Sky Hook. LOL
    1 point
  35. By the smile on Brodie's face I'd have to guess he knows how lucky he is to have Don Silsbe as a neighbor
    1 point
  36. Today, the hull went 3D, thanks to Brodie, my helper. These little sawhorses are only 24” high, and they’re too tall!
    1 point
  37. Right from the West Systems website Designed for: Low-Friction Coating Scuff Resistance Color Modification $35.00 for a 12 oz can at West Marine I'd say just don't drag your bottom on the ground
    1 point
  38. I ended up just buying the aluminum tubes from B&B as well. Cheaper than any supplier I could easily find. I think the weight savings are more important for me than the marginal cost savings, depending on how you can source your lumber. That said, if I was using this as a show boat, or wanted another fun wood working project, I'd probably enjoy making a wooden mast.
    1 point
  39. We used graphite powder mixed with epoxy as a barrier coat on our Albin Vega 27: https://www.instagram.com/p/BoCa8pvh9ET/ (if that link doesn't work for you, let me know and I'll post a picture later). It was purely for aesthetics in our case and didn't serve any other purpose. The idea was that if/when our ablative bottom paint started to fail/scrape-off, then at least the boat would still look reasonably nice below the water line. I think you could also make the argument that the graphite offers marginal UV protection, but at the surface, the epoxy would still be susceptible to damage.
    1 point
  40. Great to hear! I thought I remembered seeing them on Matt and Amy's dinghy, I think that's actually what gave me the idea. if they end up interfering with the nesting, I can plane/sand them off pretty easily.
    1 point
  41. At least the Spindrift 9 plans say that the inspection hatch is optional.
    1 point
  42. Didn't check the state of the Perfection yet. Since this is basically "bilge space" we just put one coat of Epifanes monourethane that we had lying around. Idea was that by painting it white, it'll be easier to find things if we stash something there. Also, nice to see that the hatches we bought fit just right: Forward flotation chamber we'll keep as just epoxy as there is no inspection hatch.
    1 point
  43. I added bilge strakes, or runners if you prefer. Three good reasons: - they stiffen up the floor - they protect the hull from damage - they gave me a solid place to add through bolted eyes for lifting the dinghy in davits Mine are on the aft half only so don't interfere with nesting. I'm not the only person to have done this, Sailing Florence of YouTube fame did the same. https://messing-about.com/forums/topic/12813-spindrift-11n-build-in-scotland/page/2/#comment-111096
    1 point
  44. I just realized that a lengthy and clear thread from Alan was not linked to in this thread regarding a centerboard modification to the older Mark 3 boats: Steve built a beautiful CS20m3 and decided to modify his centerboard trunk. He covers his work starting around page 43 in his massive boat thread:
    1 point
  45. Today is somewhat of a rest day after last night's party. We painted the aft flotation chambers white, and glassed the forward bulkhead.
    1 point
  46. The vaka parts are ready for going 3D tomorrow!
    1 point
  47. Got the slot cut, which was pretty easy with a flush trim router bit. Only difficulting was on the side where the box is angled, as the angle prevents the flush trim bit from cutting all the way to the edge, so I had to file/sand that side down the rest of the way. Gaps were filled with thicken epoxy. Also glued on the keel -- I used a lot of ratchet straps to achieve the required bend. I also applied a light fill coat of epoxy to one side of the boat to try and smooth out the surface -- it was peel plied, but there were defects that I wanted to correct to make for a nicer finish. Unfortunately this coat didn't go on very well, as my cleaning was not completely adequate, possibly residue from the acetone or lacquer thinner I used. Now I have started to use a scoth-brite type pad with RO water as my last step before coating with epoxy (in addition to cleaning with a solvent and removing all dust), and following up with a tack cloth. If the water beads up at all, then it's not clean enough. After sanding this semi-failed coat down, I decided to add epoxy fairing compound to all outer surfaces, and have got about 2/3rds of the boat sanded fair. Might go back and hit a few spots again. This has greatly improved the surface smoothness, but I think I would have been happy either way in the end. In the photo below, the transom has not yet been sanded. I also decided to add 2 extra "strakes" or mini keels on either side of the hull. I couldn't really find photos of anyone else doing this, but I'm sure someone has. The reason I added these is because the boat will be our primary tender, and hauled out on shores of various conditions. It probably wouldn't take very long for the paint to get scratched up. These additional keels are tall enough to prevent any part of the hull from touching the grand when hauled out onto a relatively flat surface. The only thing I stupidly didn't think about is how this will affect the nesting. There's only about 1' protruding into the forward half of the boat, and the keel height is only 0.62", but it might be enough to interfere. Guess we'll find out! I also don't know how this is going to affect sailing performance, but honestly, I think I'll be able to live with it.
    1 point
  48. I'm pretty sure a Laser radial mast will work if you can find one in your area. I would change the gooseneck and make the boom out of wood
    1 point
  49. I used red cedar for all solid wood pieces except for the daggerboard. I wanted to keep the boat as light as possible. I bought the mast kit from B and B and have it so the three sections can nested together. Cost at the time was $175 shipping included. I think it is $192 now.
    1 point
  50. I was at Farley Boat Works as a volunteer boatbuilder when this Core Sound 17 was built. The skill, attention to detail, and commitment to a high quality build were evident every day. The lead builder, Travis's father, has a background as a professional woodworker. This boat is a flagship example of a CS17.
    1 point

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