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Summer Breeze - Core Sound 17, Mk-3


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Steve, it's funny the way our brains pop out those little gems. It's great fun to pull up to another boat like that, and then pull away like we were some kind of "hot shot racer". These Core Sounds make that easy! These things self steer so well that you don't need to keep your hand on the tiller much of the time. Heck, Alan can sail all over the place by just moving around in the boat and NEVER touch the tiller. But he IS a hot shot racer.

 

I rig mine with home made "tiller tamer" so I can lay back and relax. Now that I have the cooler where it is, things will be even better. Just reach in for my iced tea or grape soda, crackers and cheese and summer sausage, or Vienna sausage. Wow, I can hardly wait, y'all! Durn, I'd better get out in the garage and get those cockpit seats glued in....see ya!

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Here is Sumer Breeze with her new ownwers, Dale and Kristi in Florida.

Oh, man, I just can't do that again. I've done a few small sailboats with all the filleting and taping and mixing and sanding. I also did a round few strip/glass canoes with all the mixing and sanding

After considerable research and development, I've found surgical tubing makes the finest slingshot engine.

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Chick,

I noticed in an earlier post of yours that the ballast tank baffles all had large (6-8") holes in them. Is that something you added, or did they come like that (mine don't have those)? How do you expect to fill/drain the ballast tanks (I worry about getting it dry after once on land)? And do you expect to put hatches in the cockpit sole to get to the (non-ballast tank) bilge area?  Also, the latest version of the manual alludes to tapering the cb trunk slot for wrapping glass into the slot. Will you be wrapping glass into the slot when you glass the hull?

 

Thank you so much for all your posts - I am Really glad you're well ahead of me on your build. I love the ice chest idea and expect to follow suit (with that and some of your other ideas). No interior outboard well for you?

 

Anyhow - thanks,

 

Fred Rowley - Seattle

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Fred, my baffles came with the big holes. The baffles keep water from suddenly "sloshing" from one side to the other, or front to back. The main culprit is "free surface effect"---yeah I know, ya better ask Graham what this means. I will use an Anderson bailer to fill and drain the tank. All of the water will drain with the boat on the trailer. I will probably add an extra way to fill the tank when the boat is moving through the water as the Anderson would not fill when the boat is moving. I used a regular transom type drain through the bottom on my CS-20, Mk-2. Worked fine. Some will use a pump---either diaphragm or electric to fill and empty. I do plan on an extra hatch in the aft area of the cockpit.

 

When I build my c/b trunk, I "taper" the bottom to leave extra room for wrapping the glass from the bottom down into the trunk. I use 2 layers of glass. I do this tapering before glassing the two halves of the trunk and assembling the. Even if you don't taper the trunk, definitely glass the bottom to trunk joint. This is a real stress point. If you get water in here "you'll be sorry". Ask Alan about this on his boat that he bought from someone else.

 

Thanks for the nice words! I guess that you are referring to an interior well like on the Princess? No, I love the well on the Princess (It was my idea in the first place), but there just isn't enough room in the CS-17.

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Chick, 

I've been following your posts. 

At what point during construction will you make the cutouts for the bailers?   I had a thought, most likely impractical.   If you put one bailer in reverse, remove the flap, it will force fill the compartment when sailing.  A vent would be needed.  The other bailer could be for  removing water.   Just a  random thought.  I am not sure at the moment how I want to fill or empty the tank.   I have had trouble with core rot on other boats around the bailer. 

 

Thank you

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Steve and Chick, 

 

Thank you both.. Water ballast and live bait well.  That would be a unique combination.  My wife and I are building CS17 mkiii to be named Avocet.  We have just completed first fillets this weekend and hope to get the rest done next weekend. All in all going well.  Hull seems symmetric and level. Not all my projects have gone so well.  I have a kayak named Porto. But there is still time for me to personalize this project.

 

Best Regards to you both.  

Richard Johnson 

Wayfarer 10873 Black Skimmer

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When installing this type of bailer, I like to route out a very shallow pocket, for the flange and bedding to live in. In most cases you don't have to cut all the way through the outer veneer layer in the plywood, to do this and the result has the bailer flush with the inside of the boat, so all the water can be evacuated, without a pool of wetness lounging around the flange and bedding.

 

In the live well image above, the bailers are being used differently than typical on a sailboat and the well is drained through a conventional PVC fitting. I use a different approach for this too. Instead of a fitting that forces the outlet above the bottom, because of the flange, I use a transom tube, mounted at a slight angle. I hammer the bottom of the transom tube flange flat, so it can lie on the bottom flush, often in a shallow divot I plow out with a DA. This is epoxied in place and I use a standard transom plug to seal the tube in use. Because of the shallow divot, just in front of the tube and the angle, the entire contents are permitted to drain off, no puddles.

post-304-0-10051000-1436307405_thumb.jpg

This is a sailboat with this treatment. The drain is in the king post at the back of the centerboard case, taking advantage of the existing slot in the bottom of the boat. It's hard to see in this image, but the tube is angled down to drain into the case and the transom plug is slightly below the inside of the hull bottom. This was my solution to a garboard drain, which on this boat would have required two, one on each side of the case, if they were traditional garboard drains.

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Nope, if fastened and bedded properly, both work just fine. From a technical stand point, there's more mechanical advantage to an outside flange, but given the pressure difference (between the two types) seen on the boat sizes, that employ these bailers, not really a concern other than statistically.

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Chick, have you started your fore hatch? I have mocked up my original idea using a Bomar hatch, and I am not happy with the esthetics. Too "clunky " looking, also just barely won't open fully when the mast is lowered, which is the point anyway. Are you still going to use a sliding hatch? I am ready to paint the deck but this darn hatch has me scratching, and thinking of a sliding forward hatch.

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I've been on a vacation and just got back. It will be a sliding hatch using the same hatch sliders as the companionway hatch. It will be a while before I get to it. The only reason I'm using a sliding hatch is that I want to be able to open the hatch with the mast lowered so I can come up through it to raise the mast.

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Chick and Jay, 

           I am nowhere near the hatch construction but am already thinking about it.  When you have drawings or photos, please post them. I have seen photos of a CS 20 MKiii but cannot see exactly what was done.   No rush I am a ways behind.

 

Thank you

R Johnson

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Until someone shows me something better, I am planning on this. Unorthodox, but I think pretty effective.

 

Quick to flip open/closed. Should allow opening even with mast layed down, but I can't prove that yet. Worst case you lift the mast a bit. Lightweight. Secure (lockable). Regular hatch boards (2 or 3) with a screen replacement for at least one .  Hinged with plastic hinges along the side to be watertight, with a overhang front and rear to prevent water egress. Flipped open shouldn't interfere with lines led to cockpit along cabin top. Plan on having handrails like Doug's boat and carefully make it so hatches are supported evenly along the length by handrail so you could stand on them even when open. Joint in the middle will have the right side overlap the left side. I will sort all this out in a prototype when I get that far, but this illustration should give you the idea. In a cross wind you could prop one side up and catch a nice breeze into the cabin.

 

Any thoughts?

 

post-853-0-22166600-1436902327_thumb.jpg

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Finally got back to work on "Breezy". Been off on a vacation. The entire sheer strake to hull joint is now filleted and taped awaiting sanding. In the picture you'll note the temporary spreaders to hold the top of the sheer strake at the correct distance apart. Since I'm not using the hanging knees, I'll have laminated cabin top beams to take their place. Alan was nice enough to give me the dimensions for the curvature for the beams.

 

Tomorrow I'll get back to working on the cockpit. But now let's look at a couple of pictures.

 

post-1823-0-31731700-1436910599_thumb.jpg  Sheer clamp to hull joint and temporary beams.

 

post-1823-0-83382800-1436910600_thumb.jpg  One of the beams in the laminating jig. Tomorrow I'll make the other beam.

 

 

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Hi guys. Well, I've been doing lots of sanding the last couple of days, but I also got a few other things done. As you know, I'm not using the "tunnel" in favor of a companionway hatch and forward hatch, nor am I using the hanging knees. Take a look at my cabin top beams that are now in place. I also managed to glue in the cleats to the seat tops for the cockpit seat backs.

 

post-1823-0-92210100-1437166750_thumb.jpg  Here's my beams.

 

post-1823-0-13271000-1437166752_thumb.jpg  Beams from another view.

 

post-1823-0-40062400-1437166749_thumb.jpg Seat back cleats.

 

post-1823-0-16169700-1437166753_thumb.jpg  Seat back set in place (almost) just to see what it's gonna look like.

 

I'm starting to get excited y'all, she's beginning to look like a boat! Hey, Lennie, you may be right about that completion date changing...

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Here's today's effort. Got the cleats on the top edges of the sheer strakes and cockpit seat backs. I had to make them 1/2" x 1/2" to get them to bend enough. You can also see how the "pocket" for the cooler lid is built into the seat back. My old drafting weights are holding it until the glue sets.

post-1823-0-97022600-1437445727_thumb.jpg  post-1823-0-94832200-1437445728_thumb.jpg

 

Here is the pocket again.  It is how I've made room for the cooler lid to raise. I told y'all that I had a plan.

post-1823-0-60966500-1437445723_thumb.jpg  post-1823-0-33606000-1437445725_thumb.jpg

 

Last but not least is how the enclosed area between the sheer strakes and the seat back is gonna drain. I always try to "bush" the holes for anything going through the hull with a section of PVC tubing.

post-1823-0-98307200-1437445726_thumb.jpg

 

The seat back will have "Stuff holes" in it so I can "stuff my stuff" like dock lines, rain gear, or whatever into the combing. I haven't decided yet if the back end will be open so oars or the sprits can stow inside.

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