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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

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20 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

Very funny, Amos!  If you must mnow, mine has been ordered, and will arrive the end of the month.  I even drove my boat up th Chick's place.  We put his motor on my transom, just to make sure it fits.  Hydro Lock, here I come!  LOL

 

Yep, it's hard to beat the price and weight combination.

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I'm getting ready to paint the storage area just aft of the bunks.  It will be easier to paint this area now before I put the cockpit seat tops on.

 

I'm using Devthane 379 ( a two part urethane paint).  I tested the paint on some epoxied scrap wood.  It went on well and cured hard. 

 

I have some questions concerning applying multiple coats of this type of paint.  What is the overall process?  The manufacturers instructions are severely lacking.  Here what I know so far:

 

Step 1:  Clean the epoxy with water to remove any blush.  Sand the epoxy to 80 grit.  Clean with alcohol.

Step 2:  Stir the paint, mix using the correct ratio, and apply a thin coat.  Tip off using a foam brush.

Step 3:  ????

 

What conditions do I have to meet to apply the next coat?

 
Do I need to sand between coats?  The manufacturer's instructions imply that you do not have to if applying the next coat within 24 hours.  Is it similar to epoxy in that if you apply the next coat before the first completely cures sanding is not necessary?
 
If you do sand between coats, what grit would you recommend?  320 grit was recommended online, but that seems like too high of a grit.  Is the purpose of sanding between coats to smooth out imperfections, provide "teeth" for better adhesion, or both?
 
Is it necessary to stir both part A and B?  I've been thoroughly stirring both parts, but it seems like the small can (the catalyst) doesn't need stirring.

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Amos, I haven't used that particular product but my experience with 2 packs is that you don't need to sand between coats unless it has fully flashed off and cured. If you leave it past the curing window, you need to sand to provide mechanical adhesion and generally dull the surface. If you have prepared your substrate well, and not got any lumps in your paint or airborne pollution, you shouldn't need to sand out imperfections. If, on the other hand, you end up with runs, you will need to let it cure, sand out the run, and start again with the coats. The beauty of painting multiple thin coats within the window is that they will chemically bond and give you a consistent and tough finish.

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I glued in the starboard seat top, using a "freezer bag with the corner cut off" method which worked well.

 

20170524_172726.jpg.aea44c5c4b04fb88be78f1d1462d8931.jpg

 

20170524_180931.jpg.b57e808b255d72b84612710a2f599778.jpg

 

Edited by AmosSwogger

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Amos, that looks fantastic!  That white will really help fine things when they get down in the aft cabin!   See you have a weightlifter background!  I used a bunch of dive weights and gallon jugs of water! Never enough clamps or weights!  

 

Think you you will make the Great B&B Messabout with your boat? 

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23 hours ago, Jknight611 said:

Amos, that looks fantastic!  That white will really help fine things when they get down in the aft cabin!   See you have a weightlifter background!  I used a bunch of dive weights and gallon jugs of water! Never enough clamps or weights!  

 

Think you you will make the Great B&B Messabout with your boat? 

 

I need to lift those weights more often Jay; my arms and legs are skinny and weak!

 

I probably won't finish the boat in time for the Messabout.  Working with my kids really slows me down at times . . . 

 

20170522_121247.jpg.41efce0e3ed73343285befe913ecb72d.jpg

 

. . . but it is worth it when I see a smile like this.

Edited by AmosSwogger
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On 5/22/2017 at 5:31 PM, AmosSwogger said:

Very impressed with this Devthane 379.

I called the Glidden paint store that sells DeVoe, and they say that it has been discontinued, and that the line sold to International Paints. 

 

By the way, pictures aren't showing up on your posts. Is it only for me? My computer has been doing some odd things.

 

 

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I switched photo hosting sites.  I was using Photobucket, but I haven't been able to log into my account for a month now (I'm not the only one, Photobucket has a huge log-in problem).  I'm now using Google Photos but I must be doing it wrong (it shows up fine for me, but that's probably because I'm signed into my Google account).

 

Thanks for letting me know, I'll figure something out.

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Why don't you just drag them into the B & B site. I lower the res a bit because my camera takes ridiculously large pics and then just drag them in.

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Amos, 

 

12 strand lines like that are made from polypropylene and are VERY strong. They do have some disadvantages. They are slippery so they are no good to use in a cam or Jam cleat. Also if they catch something with a burr or snag on a ring ding you'll pull a strand right out of them and sometimes you can smooth it back in but over time they start to get a bit fuzzy. Still strong though. They also have excellent wear resistance so they can roll over a block with a high turning angle and far outlast a dacron line which will eventually break from internal friction of the strands. 

 

It would work excellent for the centerboard uphaul line and I have used 12 strand for that before. The very first part of the purchase that does not need to be cleated would be idea from 12 strand. You can tie bowlines in the ends and they will hold for all of our applications but they will slip once you start to approach the maximum load capabilities of this line. For the CB uphaul it might see 200lbs which is not even close to what the line could handle. The bigger advantage to my mind using 12 strand there is that it will last longer rolling over the cheek block inside the trunk. 

 

One tricky part is figuring out how to get it to stay in the centerboard. What I have done in the past is put a bunch of overhand knots in the end and then a large fender washer with a tiny hole. with the fender washer inside the centerboard hole with stopper knots behind it you should be good to go but I've always backed it up by just pouring the lot full up with epoxy. You'll get years of service from it.

 

12 strand is also sold with a braided cover over it which gives a line the low stretch and strength properties of the 12 strand but a braided cover that can be used in a cam cleat. any high performance line for racing are of this type where low stretch is a requirement. For our Core Sound boats the loads just below the threshold where stretch is something we need to consider for halyards and such. The CB pennant is likely the highest loaded line on the boat when the CB is retracted. 

 

 

 

 

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Thank you for the information; I appreciate the education I'm receiving here on the forum. 

 

I'll use the 12 strand for the first part of the centerboard line.  Should I use braided 12 strand for the remainder of the uphaul line and the rudder up/down hauls?

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6 hours ago, Steve W said:

Why don't you just drag them into the B & B site. I lower the res a bit because my camera takes ridiculously large pics and then just drag them in.

 

Followed your suggestion and replaced the pictures; let me know if you see any problems.

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Spectra is intolerant to UV rays, and will eventually lose strength over time.  (Although there'slittle demand for strength in this application.)  I used it for the first stage of my centerboard penant, and for soft shackles.  For your other small control lines, I suggest using Sta-Set or FSE's Dinghy Control Line.

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56 minutes ago, Thrillsbe said:

Spectra is intolerant to UV rays, and will eventually lose strength over time.  (Although there'slittle demand for strength in this application.)  I used it for the first stage of my centerboard penant, and for soft shackles.  For your other small control lines, I suggest using Sta-Set or FSE's Dinghy Control Line.

Cool, thanks Don.

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