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Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA


AmosSwogger
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Looks like you are doing well with the hatches. It is definitely a tricky bit of construction. I was having a difficult time reading the plans and it has been awhile since I did mine. But my best reading is that the inner coaming must be set back it is not in the same plane with the outer coaming.  First picture is correct. The outer coaming glues right against the vertical sides of the  seat. You want the front of the hatch cover to lay flush with the vertical sides of the seats. You are correct the inner coaming must be set back 1/8 to give you some wiggle room and to account for the fact that the hatch cover does not drop down vertically but pivots back.

 

The spacer and the outer coaming should be in the same plane forcing the inner coaming back. I wish I had the pieces in front of me to be absolutely certain as I struggle a bit going form 2 to 3 dimensions.

 

Take your time you want to have it right before you make it permanent.

 

Good Luck

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Thank you Pete.

 

Ten oz / sqyd.

 

Probably a dumb question, but I have zero experience with outboards.  I may go with an external bracket, but if I do end up putting in a outboard well, should it go on the port or starboard side of the boat?  I'm right handed.

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Amos,

 

I do not think that you can make a well work on the 20 if you are staying in the 2 1/2 hp range. Your freeboard is a bit taller than the 17. If my freeboard was 1/4" taller or more it would have gotten ugly. The reason is that there is no reverse and you have to turn the motor 180 degrees for reverse. The problem is that the exhaust curves back over the cavitation plate which swings under the bottom of the boat in reverse. If you cut the well deeper, the cowl under the motor will hit the transom.  Mine clears the bottom by an honest 1/4" and the cowl clears the transom top by less.

 

Before everyone says just get a long shaft, the shaft extension goes under the exhaust / cav plate and does not solve the problem. I put mine to port before I realized my error because the tiller is to port which comes very close to the cockpit coaming. with the tiller down I can turn the motor a couple of degrees to port without hitting the port cockpit coaming. It just allows me to tune the motor for straight running with the tiller down. I can only reverse the motor by turning it 180 to port but only after lifting the tiller 90 degrees. 

 

I am not finding this a big deal in real life but it would be more elegant if the motor was to starboard. With the tiller lifted I can vector the thrust each way for tight maneuvering and fortunately the motor has a clutch, so swinging it 180 degrees is not difficult. When I turn the motor to rotate the boat I am glad that it is only 2 1/2 HP because it really turns fast.

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I apologise, I completely used the wrong term.  I want to duplicate whatever it is you made on Carlita to accept your outboard.  I found some pictures from your thread and from Alans' Google pictures link.  I just don't know what side of the boat to put it on!

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I just re-read your reply Mr. Grahm and it makes more sense now.  I just need to go ahead and order the outboard; once I have it in hand I can figure out a solution.  I'm probably wasting everyones time asking questions before I have one in hand.  Thanks again.

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Amos, if you are going with the Suzuki, you can review my thread. It took me a long time and a temp transom made of luan to get it just right. Ironically, it looks like Graham's in reverse and a longer version of Chicks. I liked what Pete did, but I wanted to keep anything protruding from the transom as catching a mizzen sheet is a chronic problem on my Sea Pearl. On my adaption there is a transom pad, but I plan on radius-ing it to keep lines from catching it is necessary. I also have a Honda 2hp Long shaft and it fits there as well.

 

I love the look of that reverse transom, and I'm sure the longer water length makes it faster, but i sure spent a lot of time fitting the motor.

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Amos,...

Check out my posting of 10/9/2015 at:

http://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9758-motor-mount-suzuki-25-cs203-4/

Be sure to check my last posting (on that topic [11/11/2015]) and view the photos of the finished motor-mount.

I had my new Suzuki 2.5 on hand before designing the transom interface. Take note that the Suzuki shaft has about a 5 degree slant (in its lowest adjustment) -- then 5 degree notches for 5, 10, 15, 20 ... degrees tilt. There is no position for 0 degrees tilt. And the transom for the cs20.3 is about 5 degrees negative. So, the motor's clamping block needs about 10 degrees positive tilt (with respect to the transom) in order for the prop shaft to be parallel to the surface of the water.

And, depending on how far out-from-the-centerline you mount the motor, you'll need to lower the clamping block (down from the transom top) by about an inch -- in order for the cavitation plate to clear the boat's bottom when in the reverse position. That will require a "motor mount well" (into the deck) to allow for the clamping screws and the motor space when tilted out of the water.

I had to do a "proof-of-concept" mock-up with the motor itself to clearly understand all the interface problems.

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Thanks Chick, that is real helpful.

 

I'm going to stop thinking about this until I actually get an outboard in hand.  Truth be told, my mind wasn't in the right place yesterday, I was trying to distract myself with boat work yestday but had trouble concentrating.

 

My co-worker, Terry, was killed in the terrorist attack in Ft. Lauderdale.  I spoke with on him Thursday, he mentioned he was going on vacation, and on Friday he dead.  Killed right in front of his wife.  He was 62.

 

We used to work a 12 hour shift together (6am-6pm).  He was alway cheerful and friendly early in the morning while I tended to be grumpy.  He never complained and was always helping new employees out.  A real steady individual that could always be depended on.  He will be missed.

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