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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

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14 hours ago, Capt Bones said:

Beautiful boat sir, beautiful.  Good job!  Nice looking trailer also.

 

Thank you, I've been following your build as well.

 

 

Drew, I agree on reinforcing the tabernacle: I fiberglassed the entire tabernacle before installing it and then fiberglassed it in place to join it to the deck.  Overkill, I'm sure, but it helps me sleep at night. 

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Wonderful, Amos.  I can envision many happy hours afloat for you and yours.  It won't be long.

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Riveting on the mast track.

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I borrowed two rivet guns, one from each of my immediate neighbors, and ended up breaking both of them.  Neither could be fixed.  When I went to replace them I discovered they are very cheap rivet guns (costing $20-25).

 

Basically the spring loaded wedge that separates the jaws that clamp onto the rivet shaft fail easily on these light duty guns.

 

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This gun wouldn't release the shaft and completely jammed; couldn't free it even after disassembly.

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When I purchased two new rivet guns to replace the one I broke, I found out why they broke.

 

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According to the back of the package they are not heavy duty enough to handle SS rivets.

 

I opened the package on the of the new replacement guns I bought and it did finish the job without breaking, so there is that.

 

Long story short, if you end up having to use one of these light duty guns for SS rivets dissemble it before you start and lube up the wedge and spring, and don't count it to be able to complete the job.

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Splashed the boat for the first time today in motor boat mode (still working on the masts and rigging).  Everything went well.  We put in on the George Washington Canal right off Route 17 (close to the Dismal Swamp and just a few miles from our house) and motored down to the North Carolina border and back.

 

The boat rolled easily off the keel rollers; glad I mounted 5 rollers on the trailer (thanks Joe Anderson for that tip). 

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We had a toast on the water with sparkling apple cider and grape juice.

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The kids enjoyed the cabin.

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The motor performed well; impressed with how it pushed the boat even at idle speeds; a testament to how light this boat is.

 

Thank you to everyone on the forum and Alan and Graham for helping me get this far.

 

Now I need to get back to work so we can go for a real sail!

 

 

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A very sharp looking boat and quite the sharp looking group as well. Thanks for the pictures. The paint really makes it pop. 

 

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Welcome to the B&B fleet of happy boat owners. I'd love to go for a sail with ya at the messabout. By-the-way, I've always wanted to cruise the canal, but haven't made it yet. Maybe with Lost Cove.

 

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Topping Lifts:  Do I need to rig up topping lifts?  For those that don't use topping lifts, how are the ends of the sprits supported when the sails are lowered?

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Amos, I always rig topping lifts. I can adjust them from the cockpit. I use them to hold the sprits up when the sails are down, and raise them out of the way when anchored for the night. When trailering, I unclip the sheet block from the end of the sprit, loosen the snotter, raise the sprits all the way up against the mast, tighten the snotter, lower the masts, and then use bungees to strap the sprits against the mast.

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I consider them essential and use them for same purposes mentioned by Chick.  I think that Graham doesn't use them -- wanting to keep weight aloft and windage at a minimum.  I don't know how he copes with controlling the sprit ends when not sailing.   For a while I used 1/4" line for the main, but it was too "stiff" for my liking.  Switched to 3/16", which is much better.  I also use the main topping lift to hold the mast up while putting the nut on the mast bolt inside bulkhead #1.  The shackle end is looped over my anchor roller (and belayed to itself) with the bitter end belayed to a cleat on the garage coaming within my reach while holding the mast upright.  The bitter end also has a jam cleat at the cockpit above Blk 3.

 

Note that the cheek block (at the mast head) should be a bit down from the very top.  That's because if it's near the top, it can easily flip over to the "wrong" side of the sail.  Mine's about 4" lower than the head of the sail (when fully raised).  That seems to have solved the problem.

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Thank you for the replies. 

 

I'm still curious concerning how people get by without using topping lifts.  They seem essential to me, but they aren't shown on the rigging diagrams which makes me think that Alan and Graham don't use them.  

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I haven't rigged topping lifts, although I saw Chick's setup at the messabout and it is pretty slick for masts in tabernacles.  But my masts are freestanding.  That is, I pick 'em up and drop 'em in the hole.  This is on a regular 17, not a 20 or a mark 3.  A topping lift would be one more piece of string to untangle.  So, I let the sprit ends fall into the cockpit when the sails come down, and it's not a big issue.   I have used the halyards a couple of times to hold the sprit ends up and make room in the cockpit, as in the photo.  One issue there was sprits swinging kind of wildly in a chop.  How do the topping lift guys control that swinging?

 

 

topping lift.jpg

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53 minutes ago, Paul356 said:

I haven't rigged topping lifts, although I saw Chick's setup at the messabout and it is pretty slick for masts in tabernacles.  But my masts are freestanding.  That is, I pick 'em up and drop 'em in the hole.  This is on a regular 17, not a 20 or a mark 3.  A topping lift would be one more piece of string to untangle.  So, I let the sprit ends fall into the cockpit when the sails come down, and it's not a big issue.   I have used the halyards a couple of times to hold the sprit ends up and make room in the cockpit, as in the photo.  One issue there was sprits swinging kind of wildly in a chop.  How do the topping lift guys control that swinging?

 

 

topping lift.jpg

 

Man, that is a really good looking boat...

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