Jump to content

Joe Anderson

Members
  • Posts

    557
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    46

Everything posted by Joe Anderson

  1. Weezer Congratulations on your build. Ritalou looks beautiful. I love the Spindrift 10. She is a very fun boat. Ted is right she moves easily in light air. You are wise to be selective about the wind conditions. Get lots of practice in gradually increasing winds. I have found a tiller extension very useful for allowing me to shift weight forward when necessary, also in stronger winds the extension is necessary to allow you to move up onto the gunnel. Pay attention to which way the dagger board goes in. It can be installed frontwards or backwards. Backwards will still work but not very efficiently and the board will be much more easily damaged if you touch bottom with the board in backwards. Happy Sailing.
  2. Yes my S 10 mast is just over 17 feet in three sections. I don't have access to the plans but I think stock is three sections of aluminum, but you could do it a number of ways depending on storage or transport issues. Two sections of aluminum and douglas fir CP is good. I like Alan/Graham's idea of having the mast partner swing out of the way, then you could pivot the mast up and secure it by swinging the partner closed.
  3. Pete McCrary https://messing-about.com/forums/topic/12029-spindrift-10-1329-seabiscuit/page/3/ Lots of good info on a Spindrift check it out.
  4. I think Alan's idea to install a FG tube between the upper mast partner and the mast step is good, might make the most improvement for the time and effort. My mast partner is too tight so it tends to bind unless I have it aligned just right. My S 10 mast weighs less than half of yours which I think could make a difference. The stock mast is constructed from three pieces of 6068? aluminum tubing which I think will ship UPS. The upper section of my mast is hollow birdsmouth but that is a lot of work for minimum weight saving. The most difficult part of constructing the stock mast is making the FG bushings to join the mast sections which are of decreasing size and I think will nest inside each other. I can not think of the gentleman from Northern Virginia who built a S 10 last year or so and has lots of good info.
  5. Here is hoping you get some fair winds soon. In the mean time it won't hurt to thoroughly test auxiliary and other systems. Kalos looking sweet on the water. I guess the Messabout is not that far around the corner.
  6. Thanks for the reminder. My Spindrift 10 mast is 5.2 meters slightly over 17 feet. I only had a bathroom scale to weigh it on. The mast weight is about 7 lbs or 3 something kg. My mast is 3 sections. The bottom two are aluminum the upper section is hollow wood.
  7. Very cool video Alan. I like the close up and also the zoom out where you can see the entire expanse of the Neuse River. Looks like you were moving along pretty well with a nice swell. I see one shot wing and wing so you must have a little more video. Did you fly the drone at other parts of the course? Congratulations to you and Chief and the other tribers. Chief must be especially pleased, beautiful looking boat.
  8. Good to hear you are enjoying your Spindrift. I should be up in RI in a week or so and I can get the weight and length of my Spindrift 10 mast to you for comparison.
  9. I had to Google where Lake Catherine is and I need to download some more detailed charts of the area. Looks like an intriguing area to explore. Going out to Cat Island? Someday I would love to sail with you down there. We have fond memories of our cruise to Portsmouth with Southern Express and Carlita.
  10. Great work Jay. You are a detail person and it shows. Just stunning. Even the game warden looks pleased!
  11. I only knew Don by his first name so at first I was not sure, but now I can remember speaking with him at a couple of Messabouts. I am sorry to hear this, but thanks for letting us know.
  12. Great video. I was pleased to see you in the Everglades Challenge. It was great fun to follow your progress and having real time photos and video made it even better. It would be interesting to hear more about your experience. I know it was a tough year with a lot of wind on the nose and even though the CS 17 sails well close hauled it gets tiring day after day. Congrats to you.
  13. Wonderful to see Kalos out in the sunshine. Enjoy her launch. Looking forward to photos.
  14. Sure enough on page 156 Flocoat procedures. Thank you for mentioning the reference. Please post pictures if you like. Ask lots of questions we all learn that way. Have fun with the build.
  15. My slant on the good advice from above. Some surfaces cry out to be precoated others not so much. I am not sure what you mean by flo coat but I think you want to apply the epoxy in as thin a coat as you can force yourself. It is possible but difficult to apply epoxy too thinly ,very easy to apply it too thickly. I prefit many pieces mark where they will be bonded and then precoat only selected areas of the panel, thus avoiding cold joints.
  16. Jay and Carol Flinders is looking incredible. More pictures please when you get a chance. Don't worry about any clutter. Simply amazing having watched you bring her to life out of a pile of wood, some epoxy, and B&B Designs.
  17. One of the things I love about going to the Messabout is learning something new. This year Graham asked me if I had seen any of the Swedes videos on foam core boat building. I told him I had not. Graham knows I am interested in foam core boat building, perhaps he also knows two of my grandparents immigrated from Sweden. Anyway my interest was piqued. So now I am learning a little more about the interesting life of Sven Yrvind. He is a bit of a blue water sailor so his mindset is a little different from us coastal cruisers but his emphasis on the advantages of keeping boats small and simple certainly resonates.
  18. Todd I caught this short clip of your boat sailing so smoothly. Sailing at the Messabout 2021
  19. Thanks Padre that worked. Now I have the video showing in the thread.
  20. Ted How do I post so my video is visible in the thread like yours?
  21. Just got back from the 2021 B&B Mess-about. Thanks to the B&B family for hosting such an amazing event. This is a short video of Paul sailing around just after the Mess-about. You can see that he is not always the serious racer. During the "race" some sailors notably Alan and Paul seemed to have an edge on the windward leg. One of Graham's bits of wisdom was try lowering the draft of your sail for improved performance when close hauled. For us sprit boomed folks that means tighten the heck out of your snotter. Graham mentioned that it can be difficult when sitting to windward to judge how much camber is in the sail.
  22. Nice job on your assignment and good documentation. Also very nice launch video with good camera work.
  23. I did a search on the web. I did not realize how much information there was on the advantages of sailing by the lee in a cat rigged dinghy. That is sailing on a run with the boom on the windward or 'wrong' side of the boat on the verge of a gybe. About the only time I sail my Spindrift by the lee is when I am maneuvering around something and I don't want to gybe and than gybe right back when I resume course. For me sailing by the lee takes a lot of focus. I would not feel comfortable sailing by the lee in winds much above 10 knots. I use the technique that Dave suggested of varying my TWA to find something that feels comfortable with the wind speed and waves I am dealing with. Thanks for bringing this up. I am looking forward to experimenting with this technique.
  24. Alek I think you have raised a valid point. When the wind is up I have always felt more comfortable sailing close to the wind, you do have the waves crashing and the spray but as Amos said you can just head a few degrees up into the wind, feather a little until a gust has past, or heave to and reef. Downwind is another story. when the wind is light no problem, when the wind builds I feel a little panicky because you have to commit yourself and the safety of pointing up into the wind seems a long way away. Daves advice is sound but a little from the perspective of a racer. He has a point though. If you want to improve your sailing and push the limits at some point you have to embrace the chaos and go for it. Many times I have found the boat to be much more capable than I thought. I am not following you here. My understanding of sailing by the lee is to have your sail on the windward side of the boat when you are running before the wind. In a cat ketch putting the mainsail by the lee keeps both sails in clear air and gives you more power. Letting the sail out forward of the mast is not sailing by the lee. On my Spindrift the gooseneck will not allow the sail to move forward of the mast. It is good if there is someone to have your back. Or you can reduce sail. Thanks for bringing up some interesting points. Let us know how it goes.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.