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Riggs

OC20/B in Biloxi MS USA

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Marissa # 63 is finally getting a motor hung on the transom. Christmas and a dead pickup kinda got in the way. My folks also came out for a visit which was great. That being said have managed to machine up some old heart pine and start getting a keel sorted. Looking forward to all the madness and of course the comments :)

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Looks good, beautiful design.  

 

We live right up the road from you. We sail our CS20.3 from Kessler and go to Cat Island a lot. 

 

Lets hook up sometime soon. 

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Onto the next project already! - your rate of progress is certainly making some of us look slow :-)

Good luck with it and look forward to any updates.

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15 hours ago, Jknight611 said:

Looks good, beautiful design.  

 

We live right up the road from you. We sail our CS20.3 from Kessler and go to Cat Island a lot. 

 

Lets hook up sometime soon. 

Sounds good. 

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Are you at all concerned about the knots in your pine? I know its really really hard to find clear Pine, whenever I do it is usually has some pretty wide growth rings which isnt good either. 

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The pine i have used is about 50 or 60 years old. It was the roof deck on my next door neighbours boat shed. It was 2x6 tongue and grove which is machined down to 1 1/4 x 3 then biscuited and scarfed as needed. It is very hard and very strait so not really to stressed, that being said should i be as i have built plenty furniture out of reclaimed lumber and it has all been fine. I just did not want to spend a heap on some mahogany then machine it all down. The keel as finished is dead strait were it needs to be and lays flat on the mylars exactly where it should so dimensionally it is good. It is going to sit there for a few weeks while i transfer lines from the mylars( not my favorite task as it kills my back) :)  Then on to cutting frames , stringers ETC before it get's set up. The last pic is a pic of the end grain of the wood machined down to 1/4" x 3" 

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32 minutes ago, Riggs said:

........... to 1 1/4 x 3 then biscuited and scarfed as needed.

 

Are you saying you will use boards wider than 1 ¼" wide made of 2 or more pieces biscuited together?  No epoxy along the entire matted edge? 

 

Biscuits can help with alignment, but are designed to swell with water base glue.  They can be used with epoxy, but won't swell.  I just find that clamping on a true flat surface is key, and with pressure down onto this table flush and flat is achieved.  Biscuits in this case won't hurt any. I just don't find them necessary.  If you need to improve the glue joint by adding surface area, I choose a spline mortised into a slot in both boards. I have seen composite sheet (fiberglass board) ripped to width and used as the spline in a rudder.

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1 1/4" x 3 on the straits scarfed as per the drawings. The sections were the width is wider i only took the boards down to 5 1/2" x 1 1/2 and had to edge join using biscuits and Cascamite wood glue. These sections were clamped in many directions then put through a surface plane to get them down to 1 1/4. They are then ready for the bandsaw.  I am going by what i learned about forty years ago in England from an older boat builder. He always told me that a stronger truer piece of wood can be achieved in this method. I hope it still applys :)     Lastly there is Cascamite on every single surface requiring it, i use it over epoxy just for the mess angle.  I hope it passes muster as i don't want  to do it again LOL .  

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Urea formaldehyde resin (plastic resin glue) is available in a few different formulations and works well, with some limitations. Most of these tend to be "type 2" adhesives, meaning moisture resistant, so not recommended for continuous immersion, though can work on intermittent moisture contact, particularly if epoxy encapsulated. If you see "melamine" in the product description or contents section, it'll be a much better, more waterproof formulation of this particular glue This would be common on a trailer borne boat.

 

It works well with biscuits, swelling things up nicely. This glue was widely use a generation ago, but has been supplanted by epoxies and polyurethanes since, because of the improved waterproofing these can provide. Plastic resin also has a self life and can be temperature sensitive, both in application and use. Some formulations have modest gap filling, which is good, so the joints don't have to be perfict like those using resorcinol. Plastic resin is really good on laminates and veneers, because it'll help resist spring back. I generally prefer resorcinol for this sort of thing (your keel for example), though it too has it's issues, like tight joints, proper temperatures and lots of clamping pressures, but it is a type 1 adhesive. Lastly, plastic resin glue has a relatively short working time, maybe 15 - 20 minutes, depending on temperature. If encapsulated and/or sheathed, you'll be fine.

 

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A few pics. The bracket is a beast :) . Transfered the bearding line onto the keel and cut it without to much grief. started cutting a few frames, temp frames, doublers ETC. Heading out to New Orleans on Friday am to pic up the rest of the ply i cannot find in town right now thanks to a suggestion from Allen @ B+B. Other than that it looks like it has all been very well thought out and is moving along in a rather nice fashion. 

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When I asked you about the knots in the wood, I was thinking of exactly what your last post showed (keel), I to think that they probably dont effect the strength that much but planning it down might give you some trouble. Looks great, wish I had your time, and space to do the same thing. Good luck, I will be following with much interest. Your Marissa was beautiful and built in break neck speed. 

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Started in on setting up the frames, transom, keel and such. so far everything is working out nicly. Had a mad brain fart when i realized i had machined up the keel a little to wide but after a little thinking it has all worked out i believe. I have had to shim up the first bulkhead by approx 3/8" but as i go aft temp frame 3 needs about 1/4 and down to nothing. Other than that it all seems to be going very well. Gonna start in on some stringers next.

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Technical question. I have started looking for some wood for the shear clamp and have found a couple rough sawn 3"x12"x12' pieces of clear white cypress. They are not cheap and my question is. Is it worth the cost to make life a little better on myself for the shear clamp. i figure i can resaw and end up with the grain going in my favor.  

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I heard that cypress is too oily, and does not get along with any glues.  It’s great for screwed on bits, such as rub rails, floorboards, seats, etc., but not for framing.  Perhaps someone has a more technical background about this than just my heresay.

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Cypress can be glued if the oils are removed, just prior to applying the glue. I wouldn't use this particular species for sheer clamps, because it loves moisture and will move quite a bit, if the encapsulation isn't complete. Given it will need a number fasteners (planking, rub rail, etc.), each will be a potential moisture ingress point, making this less suitable than other species, like fir or SYP. Additionally, the clamp needs to be fair tough and stiff on this boat, so maybe sort through some SYP at the big box store and find a sixteen foot 2x12 to cut down into clamp material. I mention this size, because it's pretty easy to find a no defect, straight grained 2x12 (or 2x10) in this length.

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I had heard the glue aspect but not the moisture angle . Thks both for the input . 

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