Jump to content

Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Skeena"

Recommended Posts

Because I saw that Chick glassed his! I didn't glass the rudder on my 11N, but the tip has gotten a bit beat up from beaching and shallow water sailing. At the very least I'd glass the tip. We'll see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Transom hung rudders tend to be pretty vulnerable to damage. Even underhung blades can meet the bottom occasionally, so a sheathing isn't a bad idea. The lead edge and the tip, usually see the most bottom strike damage, so maybe the saturated rope trick is in order as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After looking at my 11N rudder, I've decided to glass it. It shouldn't add much weight and it's easy enough to do. I've got a nice piece of hard Cherry to use for the inner rudder head pieces. I've seen to many failures over the years of rudders and I want to build her tough. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what little it's worth (fwliw?) the most frequent did-not-finish cause in the Everglades Challenge is rudder failure. This according to my looks-like-to-me survey, and barring rotten weather. So rudder and hardware robustness seems worth considering. And note what anxiety rudder failure caused Aubry and Maturin in Desolation Island...

 

 

Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been having fun figuring out a way to fit a Suzuki 2.5 hp motor to my boat. I initially was quite discouraged, but I now think I have a pretty good solution. My objectives are to not have anything adding length to the boat, even if it could be temporarily removed. I think a boat this big needs a dedicated motor where I sail. This boat will rarely be beached and mostly be going in and out of harbors where oars won't cut it on windy days (I am planning to have rowing as an option). 

 

I liked the look and function of Chick's rig. To achieve mounting the motor, I made a temporary transom out of sure-ply and with my multi-tool, chipped away. To keep the motor close to the transom and still be able to spin it (reverse) the motor needs to be lowered quite a bit and a fairly wide box-out is needed. Lowering isn't the worst thing as it will keep the head low (less mizzen sheet snags?) and the prop in the water in bigger waves.  The downside is: 1. in shallower water, but if it's that shallow I'll just jump out and walk it. 2. I suppose this reduces the gunnel height and a following wave could sneak through a bit, but I don't think it's much of a risk.

 

Here is a couple of pics. Motor in reverse, prop below boat:

 

2016-04-29%2B07.44.28.jpg

 

Forward:

2016-04-29%2B07.44.06.jpg

 

In order to swing the motor 360 degrees, the cut-out width wound up being bigger than this:

 

2016-04-28%2B07.31.18.jpg

 

An important consideration is rudder interference. I think its fine for fully down and fully up, and for a fair amount of rudder travel half up, even though it's hard to tell in this picture. On my Sea Pearl I use a Honda 2hp and I screwed a thin plate of aluminum to the cavitation plate to prevent the rudder from hitting the prop because it has the same interference risk. I may do the same here. 

 

2016-04-28%2B07.30.59.jpg

Last picture below: The longitudinal bulkhead needs to be cut where the pencil line is in order to give room for the motor tilted forward.  It's hard to tell, but the bottom slopes aft where I will add a drainage hole or two. The tan line is where the transom stiffener starts at. A 9 1/4 piece of Douglas Fir I have for that. I bought one of those fancy tube ladders and I'm planning on having it on the other side. Making the stiffener wider will give me the strength for the motor and the ladder mounting, as well as for transom U bolts I've seen on other Core Sounds in lieu of cleats. The front of this box I'll run right to the starboard hull panel. I'll also have to add a wedge to the back like Chick and shape the front so the motor clamps vertical.

 

2016-04-29%2B07.09.05.jpg

 

This is my plan and I'm looking for comment as nothing has been made permanent yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may not matter much -- but another downside to clamping the 2,5 hp Suziki to the transom is that the prop thrust will be about 10 or 11 degree off from horizontal. Up, going forward pushing stern down (bow up) and in reverse, pushing stern up (bow down). That's because the CS20.3's transom has a negative tilt and the Suziki has a built-in tilt (adding to the trnasom's) at its lowest adjustment. Wouldn't matter much around the harbor. But if you needed to make a transit before dark, it could make a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pete, you can't tell much, but in these pictures the motor is perfectly vertical. The front face of the transom stiffener is routed at an angle to make it vertical and a wedge is attached on the back. I think this post of Chick's shows it best. The advantage of your mount is that the motor doesn't need to go so low as mine to make the skeg go under the boat. I had strongly considered copying yours, but I am very close on getting this into my barn as it is. This mount has the bottom of the transom as the furthest point back.

 

http://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9480-core-sound-17-mk-3-summer-breeze/?p=89369

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys. I had a chance to use the "Zuki" this weekend. All is well with being able to turn the motor all the way around to reverse, the shaft is vertical, prop clearance is fine, shaft clears the waterline when tilted. but the "other side of the coin" is.... The powerhead  will snag the mizzen sheet, I "lied" about my motorwell being long enough to being able to tilt the motor enough to "lock it" in the tilted position. I had to make a little block to stick behind the motor to hold it up. (I'll get pictures later and post them on my Summer Breeze site.) Also, if I go forward to fool with the anchor, the stern rises enough to pull the shaft out of the water so it can't pump water for cooling---and that's NOT cool. Not really a big deal. Just shut-er-off while you go forward. As to the little block to tilt the motor, I actually think it is easier to use than that silly little lever that I can never find to lock the motor up. AND it leaves the shaft enough lower that it doesn't snag the sheet as easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking that. I had to make my well pretty long to give it enough room and pretty wide to allow it to spin. My motor is lower than yours judging by some pics I saw in an old post. for those of you that can use the lock, drill a hole in the lever, and put a piece of line in it and tie it off somewhere. Then you don't have to look for it. My Honda already had a hole in the lever, and it makes unlatching instant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Zuki tries to hide his little-bitty lever. Too late for me to try the line trick, but it may be a good idea for someone else. But even if latching is instant, ya still gotta reach the durn thing to latch it up. i battle it with Turtler all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chick's words: "Steve, it's ALWAYS possible---somehow."

 

After way too much tinkering, here is what I came up with. This weekend I will finish cutting the internal and external wedges that straighten the motor mount to vertical.

 

2016-05-11%2B21.47.49.jpg

 

You'll notice a rabbit in the transom stiffener which will support the deck. The bottom is marine plywood left over from building the Suzy J. It's nice to know they have design DNA and now common lumber.

 

2016-05-11%2B21.51.39.jpg

 

It's a pretty big well, but my testing led me to the realization that if the motor was to be tipped up and be able to be rotated a full 360 it had to be this big. The wedge shown where the motor is clamped to actually will be pared down for the inside and a narrower taller one will replace it.

 

2016-05-07%2B12.27.12.jpg

 

I took time to write down the dimensions, but then forgot to take a picture, so I put the scrap back. I hope you can read it. The motor sits so low that the cutout is larger than I wanted, but it works and I don't think the mizzen sheet should catch when the motor isn't there.

 

More pictures after this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Steve, it's worth the tinkering! Looks like you've gotten it all worked out. Are you going to leave the motor on the transom while sailing? I've found that the weight aft on the CS-17 brings the boat down by the stern.  It may be a good idea to bring the motor aboard and stow it in a seat locker. If so, maybe it is worth the effort to build a BIG seat hatch to make it easier to get the motor in there. It will fit through the hatch as designed, but takes a lot of juggling and acrobatics. Maybe I'm just old and fussy, but it seems to me that easier is better. Maybe this will bring up some good discussion.

 

By-the-way, my favorite motor installation was in my Princess 22 with the "motor-in-a-well". It could be tilted out of the water without removing it, and an "aperture plug" could be inserted in the hole in the bottom. Actually, I don't think the plug was necessary, but it did quieten the "burbling" sound from water sloshing in the well. I'm not suggesting a well for the 17. It takes up a lot of cockpit seating space. Just wondering if some critical thinking can solve the problems of a transom or bracket mounted motor like weight aft, accessibility, snagging of sheets, theft of an exposed motor, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Around the places I day sail, it may need to stay right where it is but we'll see how easy it is to remove and stow. The weight is why I wanted to get it as far forward as possible. But I also want to make it so removing and stowing is possible. I'm hoping the hatches on the 20 work well as is. We'll mock them up and test. Maybe Pete can chime in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter HK has his hanging off the back on a mount and never removes it. He doesn't seem to have any problems with it and so I will probably do the same. If you are going to be placing and removing the motor while on the water you had better be careful it doesn't go for a swim. The motor only weighs 12 kilos so put some stuff up the front to balance it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually plan to sail with my Zuki right there on the transom. The areas i sail often require the use of a stink-pot. I'll be carrying weight forward as much as possible. I already hang my anchor up on a bow sprit. Graham recommends sitting in the forward end of the cockpit and using a tiller extension. Using myself as movable trim ballast will make the most difference!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been busy taping and filleting, but I have a question. I want to use a few screws in the construction of my outboard well (above). Can I just used stainless if it's trailer sailed? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure. Actually, I use galvanized deck screws from Lowe's. Sometimes even just "coated" deck screws. They are totally enclosed in the wood and either plugged or filled over the heads. In theory. no water can get to them. Some may argue that water will always "find a way". but I've done it for years without a problem. I also use an air nailer a lot and of course the steel nails stay in. I LOVE my air nailer!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm installing my rudder this weekend. Did you guys drill fill and drill the screw holes? And if so, how does one do it on a vertical face. (I know, I didn't think of it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.