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Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Skeena"


Steve W

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2.0        

 

I own a small software company. I look at these boats as being in the final beta stage. Ready for primetime, but needing a few final tweaks .

 

Par, I'm a power tool guy, but there is something about a hand plane. Truthfully, the smart move in retrospect would have been to buy a center board blank from B & B, but I had so much fun making the the foils for my Spindrift, I was looking forward to making them.(also mistakenly thought the ones from B & B were plywood). New skills learned were that glass cured three days is pretty easy to remove witha a heat gun and scraper (I wound up removing all off one side).

 

Anyway, Moving on.

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I'm one of those types that will only use electricity when there's a compelling reason, otherwise it's all muscle power.

That said, if I'm painting a house and installing 14 new doors, and they're all 3/16" or so wide, power plane it is! Well, I did ONE by hand, but then I caved. :)

I learned the epoxy/heat gun thing back in my strip canoe days. I had to remove a canoe shaped ring of blobs and drips from the exterior glass job that I made on the concrete garage floor.

I'm building a larger sailboat vicariously through you all here, so keep up the good work.

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Hand planes do have some zen, but frankly, I've got beer for that, so I yank out the power tools. I have a foil making process for centerboards and rudder blades. I'm more concerned about getting symmetricity and accurate sections, than "see me, feel me" time on a hand plane. My foil maker jig gets it done quickly and accurately and I can zen out in the moaning chair, sipping something, as I admire my handy work. I like woodworking, but I don't get much from making a rolling bevel or knocking down a surface, so a belt sander or power plane makes me think I'm faster and better than I am.

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Oh, I don't eschew powered tools for some zen feeling, or to feel some satisfaction. Let's say it's a sort of family tradition to not use powered tools without good cause...

Let's also say I have nothing against them, and have worked in a few shops where their use was prevalent. It's just not normal in my, er, let's say lifestyle, to use power when I don't need. Plus, I'm much more of a woodworker than a boatbuilder, though I like building boats more than anything else I've found, yet.

I truly enjoy learning other people's methods and ideas, though, and always value your opinions.

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OK, I'm making steady progress. I just realized I need to provide a "silicone" bumper for my centerboard. My plan right now is to buy a tube of silicone and cast it into the shape required. Anyone use anything else? Off the shelf? Will this wear out? Do I need to think about replacing in the future?

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Alan (The Masre's padawan) suggests making one out of one of those rubber pads that fit over a canoe gunnel to carry it on a car top. I'm sure there are cheaper ones than these, but this will give the idea.

http://www.amazon.com/Malone-Standard-Block-Universal-Carrier/dp/B000SXN90C

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Steve,..

The 1 x 12 x 12 foam sheet worked fine for me. Have a look at:

http://www.zoro.com/value-brand-foam-sheet-ethylene-vinyl-1-x-12-x-12-in-5gcj5/i/G0451945/

I cut a piece to the dimensions given by Alan and just sued it up into the CB well at the point he designated. If I can find that email, I'll send it to you. I have lots of the piece left -- and if you'll give me the dimensions and an address, I'll send it to you.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Things are progressing nicely. My cockpit module is currently together and mid glassed. I have found gravity to be my friend. After I tacked it together I found that by laying it on a big table and rotating it so that the panels to glass were mostly horizontal it isn't as bad as thought. I also have been using some faster hardener and working in shifts to get it done quickly so the adjacent panels aren't fully set. Today I'm going to ready the hull panels for unfolding in anticipation. I've developed a good trick for my forgetfulness. I bought some really small post it notes in a bright pink color. I stick them to stuff that needs attention. I can't tell you how amny times I've come back to the project and realized I had mixed epoxy and forgot to fillet or fill something.

 

Anyway, a few more questions.

 

1. This is mostly for Graham and Alan. I think I am not the only one who is unsure of the idea of the flotation tank aft of the water ballast to be completely sealed. The design divides that area into three separate flotation tanks assuming that the floor makes good contact all around  when put down. If one was to put a hatch into the floor in the center tank, it seems a good plan would be to put vent holes in the longitudinal panels to allow the hatch to dry all three areas. I could do that still, even though I have the module glued together. Putting a hatch (deck plate) does provide a path for water and eliminates the redundancy of three separate  chambers. Am I overthinking this?

 

2. Jay....You put a Armstrong brand Deck plate in the water tank. How has that worked out? I have one and I see how you put a support ring in. Does that  elevated support create a tripping hazard?

 

3. Jay....you sent me some pictures of your water ballast pump system. Unfortunately I seemed to have lost the pictures. I really want to keep my electrical system simple, but the dark side may be calling me.

 

Finally, to those following along. I really didn't want to build this from a kit. But I loved the design so that I decided to just do it anyway. I didn't know at the time how crazy this last summer would be with personal issues preventing me from spending much time working on it. But an hour here and an hour there and it is getting done. The amazing point that made me realize what a great decision the kit was happened when I put the cockpit module together. I though it was going to be this big ordeal with shimming and fitting. As the instructions clearly show, I put it together upside down on a big flat table I have in my shop and it was like a non-event. In literally five minutes it was fitted together and the precision of the kit is just amazing. Here is a pic I took literally minutes after assembly. Everybody have a great New Year!

 

upload_-1.jpg

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Hi Steve, obviously I'm not Jay, Graham, or Alan, but I've gone through the same things in the build of Summer Breeze.

 

The kits are WONDERFUL! I've become a BIG believer in them. I also love the building, but having the panels cut relieves you of most of the monotonous and time consuming work, so you can get on wit the fun stuff. This is especially true if you "have a life" beyond building your boat.

 

It's a good idea to have vent holes and scuppers in the aft tank that will drain any water that finds it's way in. Even though everything is theoretically sealed, it seems that moisture sometimes can find it's way in. Use an Armstrong hatch in this compartment, too. The "lip" will be under the sole, so it will not be a tripping hazard. The Armstrong hatches are the only kind that are truly water tight. 

 

When you are not using the boat, open the hatches to allow air to circulate and dry out the ballast and flotation tanks. I learned the importance of having access and ventilation for all the areas under the sole through many years of repairing "leak proof" fiberglass boats with rotten soles and stringers.

 

Did you have the sole sections temporarily in place as you filleted and glassed your panels together? This keeps everything true and square.

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I bought a power plane this year.  For certain jobs, it is the ONLY tool to consider.  But if my planes are sharp, there's nothing quite as pleasurable as making curlicues. 

 

I think Chick's Eschewer-saw (and all saws, truth be known) have a preference for finger food.  

 

I love my Armstrong hatches.  I did put a 6mm doubler behind the holes, though.

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Chick, everybody's input is valuable, especially yours! I didn't mean to sound exclusive!  I do have the sole inside during the tacking stage, but removed it after I was sure it wasn't moving anymore.

 

The dilemma with the Armstrong plates is that the smallest one requires an opening of 6.75, and the distance on the CS30.3 between stringers is 7.5"  I can make that work I guess. I'll scribe a clearance line on the bottom of the floor and make sure the backing plate is thinned there.  If you look at Jay's pictures, he put the backing plate on top, and the deck plate sits up a bit, but on the water tank, that prevents air from being trapped under the lip, which I would guess was hi intention. On an air tank this is of no concern.

 

Do you think the lost redundancy of three separate tanks is a concern?  If you aren't worried, then I assume you holed the stringers back there?

 

Don, I'm kind of a Luddite. I went upscale and bought a Shinto Rasp and (Ha!) though I was in the modern era.

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And I love mine too! I use it like a plane for rounding off corners in tight places as well as lots of other jobs.

 

I cut the sides off my doubler to let it fit between the panels. And, yes, I have scuppers and vent holes. With a wooden boat, I'm not so concerned with the air tank in the bottom. Actually, flotation is better up high and spread out to the sides and ends of the boat. It would be good to get some foam blocks in the coamings and under the cockpit seats. I'll probably fit some all the way aft in the seat lockers at least.

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