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Miyot

Ocracoke 24

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All modern engines these days are brilliant. Its pretty much a case of what manufactures sticker you want on the cowling. Reguarding fuel tanks etc, you can really notice the weight differance on my boat with only the rear tank full. Each tank is 25 gallons but I only use the forward tank for general tooling around. It keeps the weight more central in the hull as opposed to alot of weight in the stern. Things might be different on the 24.... more boyancy due to larger hull etc. If I were to do it all again I would probaly just put in one large tank forward. (If I was to get one custom made to fit tightly between the bearers it would of been around 150 ltrs.) And maybe use the rear compartment as a wet locker/ fish bin etc. This in itself opens up another can of worms reguarding water in the cockpit and so on. But all I can say is just be careful how much weight you shove at the back of the boat because you will notice it when you put the throttle down. The 20 likes the engine trimmed in to keep her bow down so it can do its job of slicing through the water. More weight in stern= alot more trim in.

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I have finally snapped, my oldest daughter came home from college for spring break.  I'm holding them prisoner at drill point.post-2660-0-95473200-1364178395_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-79061600-1364178420_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-48207700-1364178449_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-11754300-1364178468_thumb.jpg    On a more serious note, I've been using the raptor staples.  Now I don't know how they will affect  the finish.  But so far I have found them superior to using screws for attaching the outer planking.  I use a few screws and blocks for starting and alignment.  The rest is done with staples.  These forward planks are under considerable tension when you bend them in place.  I fasten the plank at the keel and bend it down to meet the chine.  Working from the top down, stapling in rows about 3 inches square

 

   More screws and blocks are needed where the tension of bending the plank can cause it to lift off the inner plank in some spots.  Care must be taken and close attention to the job is necessary.  However, if you are careful, you can bring your full weight onto the stapler by getting the right body position on top of the boat.  One leg over the keel to keep from falling off and your weight onto the stapler.  It aint easy.  But it works.  I have nearly fallen off several times.  I have several Kreg clamps with a ten inch reach.  You can work them in most places on the smaller planks to clamp and then staple.  DO NOT OVER CLAMP.  It doesn't take much pressure to get the job done.

 

The inner planking is screwed to the structural members with silicon bronze screws and they are left in.  I intend to use staples for the outer side planking as well, as far forward as they continue to work.  YOU MUST NOT HAVE VOIDS!  I am impressed with the staples and think I am getting a better join than I would with screws and blocks.  They hold well, but I use a lot of them.  They are hard on sand paper until you get the most of them sanded off.

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Miyot;

Look at boattest.com they are testing the Evinrude 150 Pretty slick The boat is coming great. I like those staples. I have two in college also. I get the finally snapped part. I am home Friday so hope to get some time in this weekend.

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I checked out  boattest.com on the E-Tec.  Looks pretty good.  I read quite a few posts on another site about the E-Tec.  Mostly positive and most owners loved them and would buy another.  A lot of comments on good power.  Post some pics of your progress.  I am trying to finish the bottom planking this weekend.  Ordered my boat trailer, it may be done by early May.

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NZ Lance has it correct. The modern engines are all good. I like the weight to power ratio of the Etech.. I am adding two stations 6.5 and 7.5. to my building jig. The distance is a little to much for the foam.  I hope to get some done this weekend. Grandfather duty tomorrow. 

Exciting to have the trailer ordered. That gives you that small glimmer of hope.

Have a nice family day tomorrow.

PG

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Getting close to finishing the bottom, then on to the chines.post-2660-0-45289300-1364698717_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-23310100-1364698743_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-52751200-1364698763_thumb.jpg

Lance, I can't believe you sold that boat.   Perhaps you will become a professional boat builder.

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Finished planking the bottom.  Running a bevel along the chine batten on the planking so the chine will have a good gluing surface to the bottom.  I have begun fitting the side stringers, this is the most fun part of the build for me.  Getting the shape of the topsides right.  This will make it or break it.  I will have very little fairing to do to the bottom, some along the keel and a few spots up near the stem at the bow.  Here are some progress pics.post-2660-0-45864900-1365126292_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-63096200-1365126316_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-34119500-1365126342_thumb.jpgpost-2660-0-72876100-1365126381_thumb.jpg

 

You can see the bevel on the top photo to the right.

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My little Lie Neilson spokeshave has been a great tool.

No matter how far technology progesses in woodworking I don't think the members of the hand plane family will ever be replaced.  Looking good.

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You just have to find people that know how to use them. You obviously do Miyot. Really looks great. Work is very busy so boat is on the back burner. I am living vicariously through you. Did you ever finish your basement?

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My basement is on hold.  I have no desire to do anything but work on the boat.  I plan to finish the basement after turnover.  I bought that little spoke shave through the mail, thinking it was bigger than it is.  It is really for fine detail work, taking a very thin shaving.  I took a metal file and opened its mouth a little so a bigger shaving could pass through.  It clogged up a good bit, especially on the Doug Fir.  Now I use the bigger Stanley spoke shave to quickly remove material, and finish with the little Lie Neilson.  Its a quality little tool and it gets a lot of use.

 

 I have been seriously thinking about keeping the boat a center console, and putting a T Top on it and forgetting about a cabin.   It would be a serious fishing platform.  I would like to take some trips on the Intra coastal with my daughters and spend a week or so living on the boat, I don't think a forward cabin on the Ocracoke would do what I really want.  So I have decided to build Grahams new Outer Banks 24.  Why have one when two is better.  Now this will be a ways down the road, but when I get some extra cash I think I'll order the plans.  Meanwhile I'll do some serious fishing.  And before my daughters graduate college and disappear I'll build the OB and take a summer on the Intra-coastal with them.

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You could always put a folding canvas spray hood. That could be removed and give you a small sleeping area. I agonized over the console. I needed a mock up for the Yacht restoration school here. They are making it for me. In Professional Boat-builder they had an article on building consoles. I followed their guidelines and this is what I came up with. I am using a cooler for a forward seat. You can ruin the boat with the wrong T-top. Too many pipes BAD to little support BAD. I have some ideas but nothing final.

.post-2937-0-47382600-1365716834_thumb.jpgpost-2937-0-44412100-1365716844_thumb.jpgpost-2937-0-92388400-1365716851_thumb.jpg

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That looks good.  I am lost about now.  I to am agonizing on just what to do.  T Top, Express, Big console with head and windshields, Hardtop.  I need to look at a lot of designs and figure out what I really want to do.  It takes as much time as building.

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I'm really interested to see your OC with a hardtop. I was messing around and drew a hardtop for the OC 20(which would most likely be similar on the 24). It kinda came out looking like a Albemarle. Have you posted any pics yet of what a hardtop would look like on the 24?

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Hightechmarine, can you provide a bit more info on the "building consoles" article?  I've looked in the Professional Boatbuilders archive index under "consoles" and "building" and come up with zilch.  Maybe the author's name and or issue date would help.  Thanks, Jerry 

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I can't quite tell from the photos. Can you describe or add additional photos has to how you attached the transom. I am starting an Outer Banks 20 and I am already wondering how to attach the transom. I am planning to bend Two layers of the transom on a jig and then add the final outer layer of the transom after the first two pre-bent transom pieces are fastened to the boat frame. But how to fasten the transom to the frame?

Thanks

Alan

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