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Miyot

Ocracoke 24

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Rogue (the boats name) is now planked from the stern to almost station 5 on both sides.  I have begun the second layer of planking as well.  I got a 115 lb. roll of 17 oz bi axial and 54 yrds of peel ply.  I'll make up a few test panels and get a feel for glassing and using the peel ply.  Russell, if you see this, I have been stapling the outer layer of planks.  It is going really well.  My hand is sore from using so much pressure.  I have to brace against the wall and really push.  It is real work and you break a sweat.  But the results are excellent.  Here are some pics from a few days ago.

 

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Russell you can't see it in the photos, (also the outer layer hasn't been started in these photos) but the staples are a hair long for this thickness of planking.  Most just barely break through the inner layer and are visible on the interior of the boat.  The next smaller size staple is to short for adequate holding power.  A light sanding on the inside will take care of it.  They do cause a slight splintering in spots.  I'll have to sand here anyhow.  But the staples will add no extra work.  They protrude less than a 32 of an inch.  My side planking is 2 layers of 1/4" ply .

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Thanks so much for the info. I am going order the air powered gun, When I'm done with it (Maybe a year away) I may sell it on e-bay. Your craftsmanship has inspired me! I have been using a mini nipper to cut off the brads when they show through, from there the sander cleans very easily. Did your plan call for two layers of 6mm? Mine calls for two layers of 4mm, much easier to bend.

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Dave, are you putting a coat of epoxy on the interior sides as you go?  Seems I read somewhere that it's a good idea to do that, but seems also that it would require some additional sanding when it comes to adding finishing coats, since the first coat would be (presumably) fully cured.

 

Looks like you're dressed for hard hot work.  S'posed to hit 100 deg here today.  I may be dressed the same by the end of the day.

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Dave, are you putting a coat of epoxy on the interior sides as you go?  Seems I read somewhere that it's a good idea to do that, but seems also that it would require some additional sanding when it comes to adding finishing coats, since the first coat would be (presumably) fully cured.

 

Looks like you're dressed for hard hot work.  S'posed to hit 100 deg here today.  I may be dressed the same by the end of the day.

Fishman 38, I'm not coating the insides with epoxy as I go.  I did hot coat all the areas below the water line that will be hard to reach after turn over.  Such areas as the bottoms (which are the tops when upside down) of the deck stringers and so on.  I may pull fillets on the side stringers bottoms (which are the tops when upside down).  If you understand what I'm saying your doing well.  Anyways, everythings easier when gravity is in your favor.  

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Greetings Miyot

Things look great!!!!!!!!!. You may want to get rollers for smoothing the glass first then the peel ply.  Bodi Econo Line Epoxy Rollers. These are at Jamestown Supply in RI. You can use any brand. Get several and show friends and family members how to roll the air out and the peel ply in. I have wide and narrow sizes. You want to have a can of denatured alcohol handy to put them in when they get gooey. So get enough to rotate them out. 

I  like the name. ROUGE I am thinking about "Afternoon Nap."  Some say it is not masculine enough. Love seeing your progress. I am so jealous. I have glassed lots of things if you have any questions let me know and maybe I can answer them. Glad to see you using peel ply it really works great.

PG

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Hightech, I have the rollers your talking about.  I got the aluminum ones at Jamestown.  The glassing work is worrying me a little as I haven't done much of it.  I'm a little unsure about how to proceed.  I got a book on glassing boats, but didn't think much of it.  I'll do some test panels and go from there.  I am pressing on, trying to get her planked.

                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dave

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Glass work is relativity ease. I would get some super slow cure hardener. I would start 18" beyond the centerline and glass athwart ships. This will put a double layer over the keel. There is a temptation to run the whole length but the piece is heavy and unruly. I would overlap the seams 1"-2". You can draw out the pieces on the plywood and number each piece of glass. This will keep it straight. The 1700 that you bought should wet out fairy easily. Be patient and only do what you can. The peel ply will keep everything down and eliminate the need for sanding. You roll the peel ply until it looks like it is part of the lay up. If you mix the filler and epoxy and apply it the next morning it will bond better to your glass layer. Then sand forever and voila you will be done. Also be sure you have nice smooth radiuses on the plywood.

Hope this helps.

PG

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Thanks for the tips fellows.  I will make a rack for the glass roll.  Like a giant toilet paper roll.  Lots to consider as I plank and progress to the outer finish work.

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Stapling the outer planks.  I put my back against the wall and brace to get the force I need.  Up forward, with the more narrow planks, my clamps can reach in and it will actually be easier.

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I decided my questions posted here last night were not appropriate for this thread and deleted them.  Sorry.

 

I'm trying to imagine how one would do it if the wall were ten feet away.

Edited by Fishman38

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Fishman 38, I was waiting for answers to your questions as well.  Don't feel you can't post or ask any question you have a mind to of anyone who posts on this thread.  You are always welcome, as well as anyone else.  The more the better.

                          Dave

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 I would start 18" beyond the centerline and glass athwart ships. This will put a double layer over the keel.

Hightechmarine, as usual, I'm confused.  By centerline, I assume you mean the halfway point between bow and stern?  And by athwart ships you mean you would lay the fabric with its long axis perpendicular to the keel, starting 18 inches on one side of the keel, across the keel and to the gun'l?  Repeat with a 2 inch overlap toward the stern, then repeat centerline to bow.  Or am I even more confused than I thought and by centerline are you referring to the keel?  If my first assumption is correct, are you recommending this method because of the size of the boat and would you do it the same way on the 20 ft Ocracoke I'm building?

 

The peel ply will keep everything down and eliminate the need for sanding.

 

Is 1700 the Peel Ply?  I googled PP and from what I read  it sounded like it's great stuff on flat surfaces but not so good on curved surfaces because it has no stretch.  Makes me wonder how it will work on the forward half of Ocracoke?  Maybe there's a later version of Peel Ply than the one I was reading about?

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Fishman 38, the 1700 is 17oz bi axial without mat.  The peel ply won't conform to bends and such without wrinkling.  Every wrinkle would cause a ridge to form in the epoxy that would have to be sanded out.  So it will be tricky in some areas.  Like everything else, it will take some time to learn how to use it.  You shouldn't stretch the peel ply.    I don't like the idea of glassing athwart ships, as this will make many overlapped seams.  Which would have to be sanded and fared.  Although I understand why you would do it this way.  Doing smaller sections would be easier for one man to handle.

 

I'm leaning toward fore and aft glassing, keeping a wet edge and rolling out and working the peel ply as I go.  It would be all about preparation.  I'm still undecided, and looking for some solid info on how to proceed.  If I could get an extra hand during the glassing procedure, I would definitely go fore and aft.  I will make up some test panels, try different layups, etc. and go from there.

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Miyot. I would be sure that you had at least 4 or 5 people helping if you plan on going fore and aft. A long talk about procedure would be good. I would get long painters handles for the rollers. That is a lot to mix, wet out, roll and peel ply. Especially if you plan on doing both the bottom and topsides all at once. I would certainly overlap the center line by at least 1 foot. The 17 oz with no mat will easily go around smooth corners but I recommend caution in the bow area. This will be a little tricky. I know what you mean about fairing seams. But realistically 2 layers of 1700 is really less than 1/8 of an inch thick. A instead 5 athwart ship seams you will have 2  24' seams. Similar amount of faring. I see that you are wearing summer attire. HEAT is the enemy. I recommend the conservative approach. You know what they say about boat building. PUT IT ON SAND IT OFF. My 2 cents

PG

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Fishman 38 peel ply is a product that goes on after you fiberglass. I helps hold things in place True it does not stretch but it will conform to curves if you cut a few darts in it. It eliminates the need to sand the surface before a secondary bond. It is a great time saver. I even use strips of it when I do the tabbing of the bulkheads. It makes them look smooth and professional looking. By the way when I said center line I do mean the keel and not the center of the vessel.

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 at least 4 or 5 people helping if you plan on going fore and aft. A long talk about procedure would be good

Could be a case of " the blind leading the blind" in my case anyway, and why a really good video of the procedure would be really good!  Does anyone know of one?  I know there are videos out there but with videos found on the internet there are widely varying degrees of quality both in content and audio/visual skill.  So a recommendation from someone who has "been there" would be very helpful.

 

Thanks Hightechmarine and Miyot for answering my questions!

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Miyot. One other small item. The reason I like to use an 1700 or 1800 is because there is no mat attached. It is easier to wet out and behaves itself. The draw back is that the weave needs lots of filler to fill the grain. I would like to suggest that you put a layer of 8oz cloth 0-90* square weave on top. This will be much easier to smooth. It also adds structure and will take lots less filler. 

PG

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Hightech, I see your point about the amount of seam fairing.  I thought it would be easier to hide or fair seams running fore and aft,one along each side of the keel and at each chine.  My plan was to glass 1/2 of the bottom in one continuous operation.  First laying the glass and stapling in place.  Wetting out the fabric in sections maintaining a wet edge and laying on the peel ply as I go.  Perhaps this is not doable.   I have seen your method done on a you tube video.  I just worried about a ripple effect caused by the seams running athwart ships.   I had also planned to tape the center line and chines.  

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