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Frank Hagan

New Shed

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mostly for roaches etc. I keep my camping gear in that shed. No termites (it is on concrete) and no ROT - this is Vegas...the humidity is like minus 20%. I overdid the bug control, I am sure...

a.

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mostly for roaches etc. I keep my camping gear in that shed. No termites (it is on concrete) and no ROT - this is Vegas...the humidity is like minus 20%. I overdid the bug control, I am sure...

The humidity here does get higher (I'm on the coast).  The huge oriental cockroaches ("waterbugs") don't live here as they did in Riverside, CA when I lived there, and I've never run across any of the smaller roaches outside.  There are strawberry fields behind us, so our main concern is rats.  They migrate through a drainage ditch, across a road and nest in a public greenbelt area behind our yard whenever plowing is done.  The most effective control is either poison (risky with other animals around) or the RatZapper, a battery-operated trap that electrocutes them. 

Keeping the rats out means the shed has to be sealed fairly well.  I'm also sealing it well for dust (when they plow the fields, there is a LOT of dust).  So I figure if its sealed well for dust, we won't get rats in there either.

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When I built my shop (12x20) I began by building two 6x10 skids with 12 foot lengths half lapped , glued and screwed together. Then a 2x8 floor system. (all so far in treated southern pine) spaced 16" on center. The one serious mistake I made was using true 8 ft 2x's for studs, wanting the extra ceiling height. The the second was building in a 4/12 roof with 1 ft overhangs. I am now searching for a house to buy, since the one I've been renting for 12 years is up for sale, and may have to cut 1/3 of the roof height off, flip it over and secure it , just to move it to the new lot! If that happens, I'll definately take pictures of the process and post em somewhere. Other than that, the floor is 3/4 a/c ply salvaged from built in shelving from an out of business Hancock Fabric store, the exterior is 5/8 T-111, roof sheathing is 1/2" osb, with 30# felt and 25 yr shingles. Inside there is a 100 amp 12 circuit service, 1/2" sheetrock the lower 4 feet, and 1/4" pegboard the upper 4. It is insulated, there are 3 120v outlet circuits, 1 240v with an outlet on both sides, a lighting circuit that covers inside and outside lighting, plus a circuit for the window style ac unit built in, and has heatstrips.

  Dang,,screw the new house,,,maybe I oughtta move into the shop!!!!

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RATS!  :P  yuck. At my other place North of here...there are little field mice (not rats) and I use those plug in sonic things. It seems to work.

There are rats here too - roof rats they are called. They are about the size of a large house cat and I have seen them running along the power lines in the backyard. Some rich fool imported a bunch of furniture from eastern Europe and the rats came with it....they have been a problem in Vegas ever since. I am not sure how they managed to find their way to my neighborhood (not a rich fool...just a fool)....but they are a problem for people that don't have dogs the size of horses. I can sympathize with the dust problem...we don't have strawberry fields...just a lot of dirt (desert you know).

Remod - I have a shed about that size too. I commissioned my brother to build it. It is the structure you see all the material leaning up against. Of course it is permanent, with electricity and water...and a homemade septic system for gray water. I'd be interested to see you move that. Too bad about the house you've been in going on the market....that stinks.

a.

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Yea Adla, I love this little house. It was built in 1928, the first in this little neighborhood. It is a Craftsman style bungalow. The owners bequeathed it to the Church next door upon thier death.

We just had a countywide tax reevaluation, and it went from about 137,000 to 248,000,,,and they are asking 290,000.They are actually hoping to sell it to a developer, because the lot is zoned for 5 small houses or 6-8 townhomes.

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Aaagh!  I'm sorry to hear about the misfortune, Remod.  Let me know if you need help moving the shop.

On the upside - Maybe they won't be able to sell in the current market and they can always dispute the tax value.  I know, it's Wake County - Abandon all hope all ye who enter, etc...  I'm just trying to look on the bright side.  Maybe they've got enough convention centers and stadiums now and the tax harpies will calm down.

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Well, I guess I'm about to find out exactly how hard it will be to move the shed, I just had an offer accepted on a house! Looks like I'll need a party planner,,,,Shed moving party, interior paint party, exterior paint party,  :o

I am thankful you live too far for me to volunteer because I surely would. ;) ;D

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  Hey man - I didn't sign up for painting...  I'll help you drag buildings around once in a while but I didn't sign up for painting  ;)

  Congrats on the new house!  Where is it?

  Greg - Distance is no excuse.  C'mon down and see a lake that's got liquid water!

  Frank - (So as not to hijack the thread)  How's your shed coming along?

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   Frank - (So as not to hijack the thread)  How's your shed coming along?

I have most of the rafters on, just missing the south end gable rafters (doubled ones).  I didn't take a picture because I worked so slow on Sunday ... it was 85 degrees here.  I'm hoping to get a lot done this weekend ... its a three day weekend for me with my new schedule at work.

I do have a question ... even with the rafters, I can "rack" the structure pretty easily.  There are two rafter ties that still need to go on, but its a little disconcerting.  I'm planning on using 5/8" T-111 exterior siding.  Will that stiffen it up as much as I'm thinking it should? 

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I think the siding will stiffen it up nicely Frank.    I have also used diagonals across the studs as added stiffeners here in hurricane country, but honestly, after 5/8 siding is added I would find that redundant.  It might help keep everything square before the siding though.

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The roof sheathing will stiffen it a lot too.  If you get a big enough wind to need any extra bracing the shed will already be in your neighbor's yard.

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Hi Frank,

The "T-111" should stiffen the structure quite well, however; you might want to line the inside with lauan paneling. It will keep the studs from twisting, it will hold insulation if you are so inclined and it'd cheeper than anything else except cardboard.

If you are going to hang a heavy exterior door, I might suggest connecting your jamb studs to the next stud on each side of the door opening.

Roger

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Thanks for the info on the siding and stiffening.  I do have double doors, so the opening for the doors is pretty wide.  I may tie the studs nearest the two studs on each side that opening together on the inside. 

I was actually thinking of using 1/2" flakeboard (OSB) for the interior walls rather than drywall.  Its almost as cheap as drywall and would add extra stiffness.

I should get the roof sheathing on this weekend; I only have the one gable end to frame and then the fascia to do prior to putting it on.  I may get to the T-111 also (if I'm lucky, but everything takes about twice as long as I think it will take). 

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Frank,

We put on the siding, the T111 prior to doing the roof.  I wanted a very stable base prior to framing up the roof and we were dealing with snow squalls.  My three youngest sons thought dad was crazy to work in weather like that, but I led us out each time the squalls let up, we worked like crazy until the next squall hit, then cover all the materials and tools, run for cover in the shop, and so on.  The squalls were hitting us with 30 to 40 mph winds and snow pellets, which sting.  Needless to say they learned that something can be built despite the weather.  The looks of surprise on their faces was almost worth freezing my rear off all that week. ;D

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You have my respect, Greg!  There's no way I would work in inclement weather anymore, especially on a roof!  But you raise an interesting point; should the siding go on before the roof?

If you do stick framing it is normal to put on the roof first to supply shelter for the construction underneath, but sheds get most of the strength from the paneling.  I would build the sides first, the frame the roof, then panel the roof, then the shingles.

By the time we put on the roof panels the weather was improved.  We only went as far as framing the roof while it was snowing.  Then we tarped the whole shebang, waited a week, removed the tarp, paneled the roof, re-tarped, then got professional roofers to put on the shingles when the weather got unexpectantly warmer and dryer.  We got really lucky with that and had the shingles on before the real winter hit us.

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That makes sense.  I'll finish the roof framing, install the window and then do the siding.  I'm thinking it will be easier to make sure its square by nailing temporary braces on the inside and then putting on the T-111. 

I was off work today, but we took some "time off" and went to the LA Auto Show.  I had never been before, and we had fun going to it.  But tomorrow is "shed day!"

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I sheath walls before I even lift them off the floor.  This assures they are square and stable even before connecting them at the corners.  You may want to run a string along the top of each bearing wall (the ones the rafters will sit on) and brace to to absolutely true (parallel to this string) before adding rafters.  Don't remove the braces until the collar ties and roof sheathing are done.  This way your walls don't bow under the roof loads.

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Dang, I just spotted this.  I built another shed in the back yard this summer.  I should have taken some pictures of what I did.  I tried to build using as much used lumber and material as I could.  Not only to keep the cost down, but to be a little greener.  I got all of the roofing for $5.  I found some 80+ year old glazed windows and a very old Cedar door.  I just happen to have an old antique locket that fit it perfect. :)  I had to calculate how large it could be based on my material.  It ended up 5x7.  I kept the wall height at 6' also due to material, plus it is more to scale. ;)  It is a head knocker for me but he boss says it is perfect. :)

A fun little project, also on skids just in case I need to move it (though it is heavier than #$%^)

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