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Pete McCrary

Spindrift 10, #1329 -- "Seabiscuit" . .

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Greetings fellow builders, ...

 

Last Saturday I sold my Penobscot 14 ("Anna") and "Chessie's" tender ("Catnip') to my nephew.  I already miss them, but at least they are still in the family.  Next will be "Chessie" herself (Core Sound 20 Mk 3 [#4]).  I'm still cruising her and she's available for demo sails and inspections by interested buyers.  If not sold by October, I plan to bring her to the B & B MessAbout.  Maybe a buyer from the south could take delivery at the messabout.  We'll see.  I'll be placing ad's this week.

 

As soon as "Chessie" is sold, my plan is to order a kit for a Spindrift 10 and have her ready for the 2021 sailing season.  Being only about 100 pounds, it should be much easier to launch, row or sail, and recover.  This will be my 11th boat-building project.

 

My other boats:

   1 -- 1963, "Outcast,” an 11 ft 1 in sailing dinghy from plans by Popular Boating.

   2 -- 1971, "Sandi," a Sailfish from a kit by Alcort.

   3 -- 1972, a DN Iceboat (sail # 2141) from plans.

   4 -- 2003, a 14 ft cedar-strip canoe (a Bob's Special) plans from Canoecraft by Ted Moores.

   5 -- 2005, "Anna," a Penobscot 14 sailboat from plans by designer Arch Davis.

   6 -- 2008, "Copycat," a 7 ft 7 in Nutshell Pram by J. White, kit from WoodenBoat Magazine.

   7 -- 2009, "Tattoo," a 14 ft 10 in PocketShip sailboat, a kit by Chesapeake Light Craft.

   8 -- 2011, "Pluto," an 8 ft "nesting" sailing dinghy, a kit by Chesapeake Light Craft.

   9 -- 2017, "Chessie," a Core Sound 20 Mk3, a kit by B & B Yacht Designs.

10 -- 2019, "Catnip," a 7 ft "nesting" dinghy, a Two Paw 7 kit by B & B Yacht Designs.

11 -- 2020, "Seabiscuit," a Spindrift 10. #1329 . . .

 

Name suggestions for the Spindrift 10 would be welcome.  For the selected name -- a nice SURPRISE !!

 

At this point I'm searching the internet for a light-weight trailer.  Recommendations from other Spindrift 10 builders and owners would be appreciated.

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#2:   I learned how to sail on a plywood Sailfish my aunt built.  Many good hours were spent on Currituck Sound on that boat.

 

For names, well, in the spirit of the model name I'm thinking of small bits blowing across the sea.  "Flotsam" perhaps? 🙂  Of course, you will then have to build a matching one, "Jetsam".  

 

On trailers, they are not cheap, but the Trailex aluminum trailers are nice.  I bought one for my kit boat through the "other" small boat designer, CLC.  The Trailex took some patience to assemble, but it works just dandy for my 15' skerry and is very light weight compared to used, steel trailers.  SUT-250.

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Brad, thanks for the suggestions.  I like “Jetsam.”  Presently, you are in line for the SURPRISE !!

 

There’s a story about that sailfish.  In 1959 a colleague built one and had great fun with it — and I just couldn’t wait to build one myself.  But marriage, new job, and four children just kept getting in the way.  Then in ‘68 living in Massachusetts with water nearby came my time to build one.  But Alcort had switched to fiberglass and was no longer selling plywood kits.  I called all around the Bay Area trying to find a kit.  Finally, I found one at a lumber yard south of Boston.  The owner said he had kept a kit in his loft for years and I could have if for his cost (he guessed about $200).  Of course we made a deal.  The kit had everything needed — even the bronze fittings, spars, sail, lines, fastenings, and even glue.  I had to replace the glue which had gone bad.  I still have some of the leftover bronze boat nails.  Now my grandson has the boat — which his three kids (my great grandchildren) will soon be old enough to enjoy.

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I bought a reposessed PWC trailer for $300.  It’s perfect for an 8-10’ boat.  Check Craigslist.  Here it is with a 10’ skiff on it.

D9AB0CD9-E2FF-41B8-A80A-7BA6429FA64C.jpeg

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On 6/22/2020 at 7:35 PM, Pete McCrary said:

 

 

There’s a story about that sailfish.  In 1959 a colleague built one and had great fun with it — and I just couldn’t wait to build one myself.  

 

I think all these boats have a story.  My aunt built hers while she was teaching ceramic arts at Cranbrook in MI in the early '60s and sailed it on the Great Lakes, mostly Lake Michigan, naming it Num-Num, because your wet butt was numb after a few minutes in that water.

 

She went on to do a ton of creative stuff all over, settling in Duck to start an art gallery, where we visited every summer.  She passed away early this year, and while I know Num-Num has rot and other issues, sitting in her garage forever, I think I'll be taking it and trying to restore it to its glory.  Something to remember family by.

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I got one of the trailer ones for my Spindrift, super solid trailer. I figured it’s big enough that I can carry the dinghy, or a long kayak, or a canoe on it with minor readjustment. 

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Chessie, my Core Sound 20 Mk 3, #4 has been sold!  Pleased to say, to an owner who will take good care of her.

 

Upon consummation and delivery of Chessie, I promptly ordered the kit for a sailing with reefing, non-nesting Spindrift 10.  Plans have arrived and kit should arrive within a week or so.  We've decided on the name "Seabiscuit."  BradW had suggested "Jetsam," which I liked -- but Seabiscuit won out.  Sorry BradW.

 

We also ordered a CE Smith Multi-Sport Trailer which came as a kit -- delivered to my grandson, Nathan.  He has assembled it and will deliver it carrying the Sailfish that I built back in 1971, which needs a bit of restoration.  The Sailfish and Seabiscuit will share use of the trailer.  Paid $1,320 (shipping included) for trailer kit.

 

1737485646_CESmithMulti-SportTrailer.thumb.jpg.9c92fe040dc2d004c022ac88b50ebd80.jpg

 

Trailer kit parts . .IMG-8762.thumb.jpg.67900339c0eab4ea67c2b9ecf70a7249.jpg

Great grandson Luke . .

 

Trailer just about finished . .

Nearly finished . .

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My wife, Annie, liked that!

 

Seabiscuit’s boom was cut from a leftover piece of 2 x 8 Douglas fir — trimmed to dimension, sanded, marked for the rigging hardware, and edges rounded over.

 

Waiting for the kit’s arrival —  I’ll next cut the parts requiring 3/4” stock.  I like yellow pine that builders use for stair case “risers.”  They come in long lengths up to 16 footers.  All of it straight grained and nearly all clear — the few knots are tight and small.  It has to be [clear] because wooden residential stairs are never painted — they’re finished natural with varnish, like ladders.  If you ask sales people [at builders supply] for yellow pine, they’re likely to say “Don’t have any.”  Then ask for stair riser stock — and check it out.

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Great name. We have a Wanderer dinghy (Ian Proctor design) that we called Seabiscuit.

When we build our SN11 (hopefully later this year) it will be named 'Jean-Noel' for a close friend who was a great inspiration to us. I think he would have approved.

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The big tractor trailer arrived at my driveway about 5pm, the driver's last stop.  He remembered delivering the Two Paw 7 three years ago.   He was very helpful and volunteered to haul it into my garage (in the backyard) on a hand-powered fork lift.  At the dip in the driveway we needed my two-wheeled hand truck to get beyond the dip.

I'll organize everything tomorrow.  Hope to see some of you all  (with Seabiscuit) at the MASCF.

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The shop is mostly clean and ready for building Seabiscuit.  The shipping crate has been emptied and disassembled.  All kit parts are “present or accounted for” sir.  Here are photos, the first showing panels requiring “finger” joinery.

6AAB4260-07A3-4660-B7FB-A2B38564C5F4.thumb.jpeg.559e99d1084a0c01080daf4cef9e2103.jpeg


At left are the transom and foredeck parts, then dagger board, with rudder at far right.

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Temporary bulkhead and the cradle ends.

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View of Seabiscuit’s garage building space with shop in background.

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Next will be stowing all parts to be easily retrieved as building progresses.  Then glueing up all finger joints.

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Finally — getting started on actual assembly.  The finger joints are now set in thickened epoxy for port and stbd ## 9 & 9a and 11 & 11a.  Tomorrow panels ## 1 & maybe 2.

 

0538F10B-041E-45E5-A4DC-A2008184196A.thumb.jpeg.11c4cda8d0e73cbddb4010793c719fd3.jpeg

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