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Jessy 15’ build log - Philadelphia, PA


Justin C
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On 11/12/2019 at 3:17 PM, Thrillsbe said:

How far back does the casting platform go— to bulkhead #2, or back to amidships?

Just to bulkhead 2. I have it overhanging by 1/2”.

On 11/14/2019 at 1:07 AM, Scott Dunsworth said:

Very!!!! clean neat looking work! kind of unusual to see, but very nice!!!!

Thanks. I’m still learning the fine line of making it look good and getting the job done. 

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On 11/14/2019 at 8:13 AM, Chick Ludwig said:

Gosh, Justin, she looks REAL good. Kinda makes some of the rest of us feel inadequate. You're doing an OUTSTANDING job!

Chick, thanks. As you’re well aware, it’s easy making it look like this. I still have quite a bit to do before I get to the finish work.

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Small update - 

 

With the temps lower and not having a lot of free time on the weekends, I spent the last few weeks coating the smaller pieces with epoxy in my basement. I’ve been using a 3” foam roller to knock out the work.

 

I set up a propane heater in the garage this weekend. Temps outside are in the 40s and it’s 80 in the garage!

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I glassed the forward bulkhead compartment and bulkhead 2. Both of these also sit underneath the casting platform. I used the small bit of epoxy leftover from glassing to coat the top of the hardwood transverse member. 
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14 hours ago, Justin C said:

Chick, thanks. As you’re well aware, it’s easy making it look like this. I still have quite a bit to do before I get to the finish work.

If it was easy, we'd ALL make it look like this. But then come the finish work. That's the REAL test!

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1 hour ago, Chick Ludwig said:

If it was easy, we'd ALL make it look like this. But then come the finish work. That's the REAL test!

 

I realized I spent entirely too much time finishing compartments that when completed, will never see the light of day. However, it wasn't a complete waste as it allowed me to move a bit further up the learning curve of boat building. 

 

Well, heating the garage was a success as the epoxy and glass pieces were set up real hard this morning.  I scraped the edges of the glass and will do a light sand. I have a few more interior joints to do, namely the center bulkhead. I expect to get this finished up this weekend. 

 

I may have mentioned a while back that I ordered two sheets of 1/4" okume.  I am going to also use the colder months to fabricate myself a small center console.  I have a rough design in place and will mock up with cardboard over the coming weeks/months. Stay tuned...

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  • 1 month later...

Due to the server issues I had connecting here the last week or so, I'm late in saying Merry Christmas to you all that celebrated.  I had a fun and educating experience getting the boat to the point it's now at this past year.  I'm going to be opportunistic with boat work during the colder months ahead and the updates will be less frequent.  

 

I may have previously mentioned that I plan on building a small center console for basic electronics and a wheel.  I had placed an order for two sheets of 1/4" Okume ply back in August, but cancelled the order two weeks ago as the lumber yard was not able to get me a ship date.  @Alan Stewart Do you have any thoughts on where I can get marine ply?  Are there other wood species a good substitute?  I do have some sketched up plans for a console if you have any interest in getting them in CAD?

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20 hours ago, Justin C said:

I may have previously mnentioed that I plan on building a small center console for basic electronics and a wheel.  I had placed an order for two sheets of 1/4" Okume ply back in August, but cancelled the order two weeks ago as the lumber yard was not able to get me a ship date.  @Alan Stewart Do you have any thoughts on where I can get marine ply?  Are there other wood species a good substitute?  I do have some sketched up plans for a console if you have any interest in getting them in CAD?

 

I guess the thing to remember is that you're going to put the same amount of time and work into the console regardless of the ply you're using. For the hull of a boat then,  It's easy to argue that you should use the best material possible.

 

For an add-on console though I could see both sides. You might hate it or want to change it in a year or 2 and you might be more inclined to change it if you use a cheaper material. I don't know how much of a tinkerer you are or how nice you want it to look but depending on that I think there is nothing wrong with using regular 1/4" 3-ply for a console like you're describing. Epoxy coated well and sealed up it will probably look great. However sometimes these ply have large voids and big surface defects that make them harder to use can mess up paint jobs.

 

If you wanted to buy from B&B I could quote you for the ply and shipping OR if you know the size of your largest parts you think you'll need we could rip a sheet in halves or quarters as needed to make shipping cheaper. 

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10 hours ago, Chick Ludwig said:

How economical is your gas heater? I tried one, but it went through gas at a horrifying rate!

 

@Chick Ludwig 800sqft garage - a 20lb tank of LP will keep it warm enough (above 70F) for 24hrs. The garage has three insulated doors so even when it’s 30F, it heats up quick and holds it pretty well.

 

The tank refill is $15 - not horrible.

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@Alan Stewart I have a half sheet of 1/4 maple ply and it’s pretty darn smooth, no knots, etc. I was thinking using something like that and once coated with epoxy, primer and paint, no one would be able to tell. 
 

As for tinkering, I have a limit?

 

I’ll do a mock up in cardboard and share pictures in a few weeks. I’ll then decide how I want to proceed. 
 

Thanks and Happy New Year to the B and B community!

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Here’s my two cents on plywood selection.  I have two points.

 

1) A lot depends on how you’re going to use the boat.  If she’s going to be docked outside for the summer, you definitely need marine plywood.  If she’s going to be garage kept, or dry under a tarp most of the time, you can get away with other materials.

 

2) Lumberyard fir plywood checks.  I would never use this on any of my boats.  I did on a dinghy I built years ago.  It was stored outside, under a tarp, and it checked anyway.  On the Duckworks FB page, lots of guys are building with this stuff.  I’m tired of warning them.  Don’t do it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I mocked up a cardboard mold for the forward lower compartment. I’m going to cover the interior in plastic (bags, tape, whatever) and then fill with expansion foam. 
 

While I did say I would mock up a center console, I’m not there yet. Soon. 
 

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I prefer not lining where the pour foam is going to go. That prevents condensation or other moisture to be trapped between the foam and the wood. After years of repairing boats with so-called watertight compartments, I've discovered that moisture can usually find a pin hole or something to get through. Of course, the epoxy coating should seal the moisture from getting into the wood.

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@Chick Ludwig can you explain more re: not lining where the pour foam is going to go?


I’ve lined the interior of the cardboard mold so that I can pry it off easier once the foam has cured. I’ll then drop this plug into the forward lower compartment. 
 

What is the method to eliminate moisture from seal compartments? Or, do you?

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What is the value of using pour foam in the forward compartment?  I prefer to simply seal off an air chamber.  Air is more buoyant than foam, and less expensive.

 

I am enjoying your build thread.  If I were to build another boat, it would be a Jessy (12?) with a center console and fishing deck on the forward half.  But I sort of already have that with my Bay River Skiff (minus the center console... so far).

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Justin. I guess I don't see why you are lining the compartment with cardboard. The compartment should be sealed in all the corners, just pour the foam in as it is. If you are concerned about the foam rising and spilling over the top onto surrounding areas, just mask them off with plastic first, but the foam should just rise like a loaf of bread. Once finished, cut it off flush with the top.

 

As Don says, there is really no need for foam at all if your compartment is sealed and air tight. You could even have a plastic hatch that seals tight and use the compartment for stowage. That is all that's needed on a sail boat. On a power boat, to meet the USCG specifications, air chambers are not legal.

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Don,  Short answer... the CG requires foam not air for powerboats. If you don't use foam, you're putting the required USCG capacity plaque saying the boat is CG certified for this many ppl but you're really not technically in compliance. I would argue that the BRS is a sailboat and so it is not bound by this requirement BUT if you're using it mostly as a motorboat and leaving the sailing rig at home for example, you might have a hard time convincing the CG that you're not a powerboat (like if you didn't have the capacity plaque installed). For a more longwinded reply see earlier in this thread. Here...

 

 

 

3 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

What is the value of using pour foam in the forward compartment?  I prefer to simply seal off an air chamber.  Air is more buoyant than foam, and less expensive.

 

I am enjoying your build thread.  If I were to build another boat, it would be a Jessy (12?) with a center console and fishing deck on the forward half.  But I sort of already have that with my Bay River Skiff (minus the center console... so far).

 

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Power boaters have a tendency to crash into things at higher speeds, they need foam.  ?

 

I used no foam in my Spindrift N.  The bow compartment has access for storage, I keep my nesting bolts there in a plastic bag.  Still haven't lost them for some reason I can't understand.

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4 hours ago, Chick Ludwig said:

If you are concerned about the foam rising and spilling over the top onto surrounding areas, just mask them off with plastic first, but the foam should just rise like a loaf of bread. Once finished, cut it off flush with the top.

This exactly! I’m looking to keep things clean. Figured since I have foam, I would form it outside and drop it in. I’ll use board foam in the aft compartments.

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