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Thrillsbe

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Thrillsbe last won the day on March 20

Thrillsbe had the most liked content!

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About Thrillsbe

  • Rank
    Don Silsbe
  • Birthday 12/01/1948

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tryon, NC
  • Interests
    Boatbuilding, Sailing, Fishing, Rowing, Weaving, Camping, Travel, Fly Tying, Woodworking, Gardening, and Lutheran Theology. (Thank goodness I'm retired!)

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  1. I assume the bridle fixes the block admidships. Does the trimming end of the mizzen sheet run up the sprit?
  2. The first stage of my weighted centerboard lift is 4mm Amsteel. It is four years old and looks perfect. But we’ll see.
  3. I thought you were simply quoting a favorite song!
  4. @Hirilonde— We all know that God loves America best of all! (Tongue in cheek comment. I don’t really mean that.) @Mark Rendelman— Yes, it is a wonderful time to do boat stuff. I repainted my boat’s interior, & varnished my fingers to the bone. Since the pollen bloom is screaming, it is time to put the brush down & go sailing. Can’t imagine what those poor non-boating saps are doing through all of this. Second photo is an attempt to show the pine pollen on the hood of my navy blue truck.
  5. I broke down and shelled out $21 for a Ronstan D-Splicer. What an awesome tool! So, I sort of went nuts with it, and changed my snotter setup. I also changed parts of my mizzen sheet system. Let me preface this post with my rigging philosophy. Local Honey wants to be rigged quickly. When I get to the launch site, I want to go sailing, not fiddle with stuff in the parking lot. The rig needs to be simple, but effective. This is why I don’t have reef points in my sail, but furl them on the masts. It is fast and easy. Also, I want the boat to be clean. No (almost no) hardware left on the boat when I’m not sailing. She is also a fishing boat. That in mind, here’s what I did. SNOTTER Did I tell you that I love Ronstan’s Shock Blocks? They are slick— literally! They work especially well with slippery Amsteel. I am also fond if lashing blocks. MAIN SHEET ATTACHMENT For the past four years, I have attached the mainsheet blocks to the transom with a ball system Iearned from my Wayfarer days. But then, I saw this slick new system on a website named geaufast.com. I couldn’t afford their dog bones ($18 each!), so I made my own with aluminum rod and shrink tubing. It’s a cleaner look, and now Local Honey has no balls! (I didn’t change the starboard side, so you could compare the old to the new.)
  6. Thanks for the explanation. So, if I ever convert Local Honey to 100% power (in my old age), I’ve gotta buy some floatation foam.
  7. Sometimes, shooting a screw through your hull is the only way to go. I especially love it when I’m cutting that hole in for the Anderson bailer. When asked why I did it, I told people it was to let the water out!
  8. I have one on my BRS15, too. It’s a Garrelick Ez-In. We love it!https://www.fisheriessupply.com/garelick-eez-in-ii-integrated-concelaed-transom-ladder
  9. When is it advantageous to use foam over air? Air is free. If I’ve done a good job with the joints, I don’t see the need. In the old days, we were concerned about causing rot underneath the foam. I’m not trying to be snarky. I’m trying to understand the advantages of foam.
  10. Thanks, Justin. My friend and I were talking about screws through the hull. I said “no worries!” She’s still skittish about it. Good to see your screws. Thanks!
  11. Yeah, it might make it a lumpy experience. I guess I need to shoot for being even with my 3/4x3/4 keel. It ain t much, but might be enough to get a grip. Hope I never have to find out.
  12. Thanks, Graham. I thought that a strip of tape was laid over the joint. This becomes very easy then.
  13. This discussion has me thinking that I want to make my stopper block lower in the box. This would cause the c/b to always poke out of the slot a couple of inches— enough, maybe, to grab onto it if I were to turn turtle.
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