Jump to content

Thrillsbe

Members
  • Posts

    1,547
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    85

Thrillsbe last won the day on July 21

Thrillsbe had the most liked content!

About Thrillsbe

  • Birthday 12/01/1948

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tryon, NC
  • Interests
    Boatbuilding, Sailing, Fishing, Rowing, Weaving, Camping, Travel, Fly Tying, Woodworking, Gardening, and Lutheran Theology. (Thank goodness I'm retired!)

Recent Profile Visitors

7,573 profile views

Thrillsbe's Achievements

Mentor

Mentor (12/14)

  • Reacting Well Rare
  • Dedicated Rare
  • Very Popular Rare
  • First Post
  • Collaborator

Recent Badges

204

Reputation

  1. When considering paint type and color schemes, you might want to keep my experience in mind. I painted the exterior a dark blue, and the interior a light gray. I used Interlux Brightsides, a one-part polyurethane. When I have nested the two parts, the dark wiped of onto the light paint. There are also places on the rear seat tanks where the light gray has worn through to primer. Here are my lessons learned: 1. Use only two-part polyurethane for this application. The boat takes a beating when nested and while nesting. Use the hard stuff! 2. Always place old terrycloth towels between the two nested parts. 3. When building the aft seat tanks, make doubly sure that there is at least 3/4” clearance between them and the forward half of the nested hull (after the installation of the keel strip). 4. Consider a lighter exterior color. (Never use a dark color for the interior, as it makes the surfaces very hot, when exposed to the sunlight.)
  2. @Hirilonde— I hadn’t thought about that, because that’s not how I use her. But you are right, although as a tender, it would be less comfortable to row from the forward position.
  3. Let’s talk TRASH! I mean the T.R.A.S.H., to use PiedTyper’s acronym. Today, I finally got to do some in-water testing. The results were interesting. First, I capsized her without T.R.A.S.H. She took on a lot of water. But the water level was about 2” below the top of the d/b trunk. That way, you can actually make progress with bailing. But it was a lot of water! Then, I installed the floatation. The first thing I noticed after capsizing her is that she immediately wanted to turn turtle! Good to know. I expected her to float stern-low, but that wasn’t the case. The weight of the sailing rig must create a downward pull on the hull. Whatever the reason, there was very little water in the forward compartment, and much less aft. I like it! I could tinker with adding some floatation in the after compartment, but I don’t think I will. My big butt takes up a lot of space just aft of the split, and my knees like poking aft occasionally. We’ll see about some temporary tanks… maybe. I left them in, when I went sailing afterward.
  4. I took this video today, for the proponents of the precision philosophy. IMG_4217.MOV Also, if you notice that the end of my tiller looks a little rough around the edges, that’s because it is. I’d like to make up something about aerodynamics, but it is really because I shortened the tiller by about 6”. It kept hitting me in the shoulder, so I had to cut it off. It’s rough because we’re camping, and I only brought a hand saw and a knife.
  5. I’ve been tempted a few times, especially after seeing Chick Ludwig’s and B&B’s paint jobs. But I’m too cheap.
  6. I’m making some tweaks to Two Bits’ rudder and tiller today, so I thought I’d take a moment and share my tiller/tiller extension connection with you. I got the idea from Geoff Kerr, the owner of Two Daughters Boatworks in Vermont. All he uses is a short piece of knotted cord. I saw this in a video about sailing his Ian Outred Caledonia Yawl. It is cheap and easy. (I’d like to say “like my women”, but I chose “sweet and uncomplicated”.) Somebody once told me “I need more precision than that.” I laugh about that every time I go sailing. If the knots are tight, there is no more slop than a stainless steel fitting, and it is totally silent. Make one using scraps, and I think I’ll win you over. Here it is, with the extension in park. I use a rubber band to stow it. Here it is, deployed.
  7. Thanks for taking me along on your sail! Hope that new magnetic latch doesn’t foul up your compass readings. LOL
  8. Regarding my T.R.A.S.H. system (love it), this is for experimentation only. If I were to build again (likely), and I had a good understanding of it’s effectiveness, I’d build it into the forward portion. I also plan to experiment with additional removable floatation for the stern, if necessary. But I’m limited there by my lazy sailing style.
  9. Too much clamping pressure squeezes out the epoxy out of the joint. I usually put a sheet of plastic on top, then a 2x6, then screw it down to the workbench with deck screws, or put weights on top. T-nuts are unnecessary in your oarlock attachment. Mine are screwed in with two #10 wood screws (each). They have not worked loose, and I’m a strong rower. (I row 10 miles per week, weather permitting.) The big question is— what are you using for plywood. If you are using lumberyard fir plywood, you will want to sheath both sides, as it will check. (See photo.) This is why I will never fir plywood again. Regarding the sheet block attachment to the boom. I must say that anything that Graham commits to paper is proven and structurally sound. He’s crossed many oceans. You can trust his designs. I have used T-nuts with mixed results. Sometimes, the tangs scratch a little groove into the recess, and the whole thing spins. I usually add a #4 FH screw to prevent that, but it is not ideal. If this happens to you, and the T-nut is embedded in a gunwale or boom, you’ve got a big mess. Here’s an alternative. Drill a 1” hole through the boom crosswise. Drill a 3/16” hole for the screw. Slip a nut into this hole, and run the screw into it. The points of the nut will dig into the wood, and bear the load. Ideally, a square nut should be used, but a hexagonal nut will also work. Leclerc uses this on their weaving looms. My looms are decades old, and their attachments hold up to the pounding. Try it on scrap wood. It provides a sound, serviceable attachment method.
  10. Too much clamping pressure squeezes out the epoxy out of the joint. I usually put a sheet of plastic on top, then a 2x6, then screw it down to the workbench with deck screws, or put weights on top. The important thing with an epoxy joint is to get all the air gaps out of the joint. Look to get “squeeze-out” of epoxy all around. This is impossible to do with the scarf joint, because it is covered up. So, I always use too much glue. This forces me to use a heat gun and scraper to remove the excess. But a starved joint is a very bad thing . T-nuts are unnecessary in your oarlock attachment. Mine are screwed in with two #10 wood screws (each). They have not worked loose, and I’m a strong rower. (I row 10 miles per week, weather permitting.) The big question is— what are you using for plywood. If you are using lumberyard fir plywood, you will want to sheath both sides, as it will check. (See photo.) This is why I will never fir plywood again. Regarding the sheet block attachment to the boom. I must say that anything that Graham commits to paper is proven and structurally sound. He’s crossed many oceans. You can trust his designs. I have used T-nuts with mixed results. Sometimes, the tangs scratch a little groove into the recess, and the whole thing spins. I usually add a #4 FH screw to prevent that, but it is not ideal. If this happens to you, and the T-nut is embedded in a gunwale or boom, you’ve got a big mess. Here’s an alternative. Drill a 1” hole through the boom crosswise. Drill a 3/16” hole for the screw. Slip a nut into this hole, and run the screw into it. The points of the nut will dig into the wood, and bear the load. Ideally, a square nut should be used, but a hexagonal nut will also work. Leclerc uses this on their weaving looms. My looms are decades old, and their attachments hold up to the pounding. Try it on scrap wood. It provides a sound, serviceable attachment method.
  11. Welcome back! “Life” often takes us away from boatbuilding. Currently, we’re camping. So I can only fish, sail, eat, sleep. Now I’m an acronym! Golly gee whillickers! My T.R.A.S.H. System will be tested in a few days. I’ve had paint issues, and “life” has intervened. I have no lights on my TP8. On my Bay River Skiff, I have these, but never use them. https://duckworks.com/portable-led-navigation-bow-lights/ Some sheath their bottoms, and some do not. My TP8 is not. I didn’t want to add the weight. My BRS 15 Is, but I don’t have to lift it, either.
  12. You’re getting there. Keep up the good work!
  13. Any photos of this modification capsized? I like the Gorilla cart idea.
  14. @Hirilonde— I am poised and ready to do this experiment. I will be able to do the testing in about a week. I’ll post the photos on my thread on the forum. Stay tuned…
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.