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Off--the-shelf Fiberglass L-Channel

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In the CS20.3 instructions around p. 17 the instructions provide for making up about 25' of fiberglass "L-Channel."  I'm wondering if this could be substituted for off the shelf parts.  I'm not lazy, I just want to save my time & energy for sanding :)

 

I googled a bit and found this product: https://www.eplastics.com/fiberglass/profiles/equal-leg-angle 

 

The cheapest grade here is $2 / foot. They describe it chemically as "A general-purpose isophthalic polyester resin system with a UV inhibitor."  The higher grade stuff is described as "A premium vinylester resin system with a UV inhibitor."  I was wondering, does that description of the type of resin tell us whether it will bond with the B&B epoxy mixture that came with the kit?  Or, if anyone has done this before, does anyone have any examples of an L-channel that would work off the shelf?

 

 

 

 

Pic-500ELA1.000X.125_thumbnail.jpg

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I tried really hard to find something that we could buy off the shelf. A while back we were given a sample at a boatshow of what I would consider to be IDEAL. Here are some pictures: https://photos.app.goo.gl/WRCfHXduXu3szT4Q6

 

It is made with epoxy and bias glass not extruded or pulltruded with polyester. It's also very light at 3.2oz per linear foot. 

 

It's called an FRP bonding angle made by ATL composites in Australia. Product number ANT3042

http://atlcomposites.com.au/icart/products/93/images/main/FRP Bonding Angles.pdf

 

I would love to get my hands on some for my boat as well to use in the ballast tank. I've sent off a request for a quote to see if B&B could stock this. 

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Jay, 

We wanted to try to eliminate some of the solid wood in the water ballast tank so we changed the plans to show using a fiberglass Angle instead of a solid wood cleat around the top edge of the tank to support the lid. Not that a solid wood cleat is bad but the thinking was one less piece of solid wood in the ballast tank would be better! So long as the solid wood is well coated prior to installation and all end grain is well coated especially then there won't be any issues. The other advantage of the glass is that it makes venting the top of the tank a bit easier since it would be more flush with the underside of the lid and also allow slightly more (ok no much but still) water into the tank. If the fiberglass angle is too expensive I might just go with wood cleats myself but it would be nice to have some glass angle pre made up for other uses too! 

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Fiberglass J channel is for sissies. 

 

Just joking. I just looked at the updated plans to see what you were speaking about. Nice change. On my deathbed I'm going to want to get back the "inverted wet ribbon toss"  (Is that right Jay?)  of the old way. 

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The green angle from ePlastics would certainly work.  It would be heavier than the stuff Alan is suggesting, which may not add up to a lot for just the tank.  It also comes with very smooth surfaces and needs a good sanding/scuff up for a mechanical bond. 

Old school rule of thumb: "When in doubt, use epoxy for repairs.   (Polyester only bonds well to itself, epoxy bonds well to polyester and itself)

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I've ordered 40' of the green stuff and will report back once I see if it works.  After shipping ($22) and cutting fees ($60!!!) it came out to about $4.15 / foot, and I'll have 15' left over.  The cutting fee was a little surprise that basically doubled the cost.

 

If its really fantastic, maybe I'll use it all up in place of some other cleats that are specified as wood.  And if it stinks, I'd be happy to sell the extras to anyone that wants some for a good price!

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Vinylester resins are typically reputed to have respectable adhesion w/ epoxy resins and higher spec that polyesters.  Here's an explainer from Mas Epoxy that I found on Jamestown Distributors' site:

https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/document.do?docId=495

 

Garolite G-10 is a standard epoxy resin/fiberglass product (used in lots of industrial applications) and can be found in angle as well as sheet and rod.  But it's a pretty high spec material, often compliant w/ Mil-specs, so it ain't cheap.  A clever sort could come up with a vacuum bag or hard mold fixture to crank out some home brew version, but not mil-spec

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