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Todd Stein

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About Todd Stein

Supporting Member
  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday August 31

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Williamsburg, VA
  • Supporting Member Since
    08/07/2018

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  1. If it falls within your travel plans, youre more than  welcome to park Skeena in our driveway or yard during your travels. If your interested send me your email and I’ll send you my address and you can google map if it meets your needs. I’d love to crew for you and Pete especially since I’m building a boat I’ve never sailed.

  2. Hi Steve, I hope you’re thinking of traveling down to the Messabout this year. I would look forward talking about your boat build and seek advice on some building steps. If you need a place to spend the night enroute to the Messabout, I welcome you to stay with us in Williamsburg, VA. We’re about a 4 hour drive from New Bern/Vandemere. Todd Stein toddmorganstein@gmail.com
  3. I’m looking to purchase a 4 stroke OBM either a Suzuki or Tohatsu in the 4 to 6 HP range. Any suggestions or recommendations? The Suzuki is several pounds lighter than Tohatsu and the weights the same in the Suzuki 4 and 6HP, difference of a larger carb I’m thinking. Do you suggest a 15” or 20” model if I’m going to fabricate a cutout in the transom?
  4. It’s been a typical hot, humid summer and Labor Day is hopefully a welcome change. Unfortunately I haven’t sailed but twice this year, instead focusing my limited energy on the boat building. Internal framework came together nicely and have had lots of opportunity applying epoxy fillets and sanding down mistake after mistake. I’m grateful my learning curve is being applied to areas of the boat that will be seldom seen! A huge boost came when Amos reached out and volunteered to help me fit and install the cockpit, centerboard and numerous bulkheads. His guidance and hands on support were deeply appreciative and helped me get over a small mental hump in the build. His willingness to help speaks volumes in of itself, but I think it shows the general esprit de corps of this B&B builders forum.
  5. She’s a smart looking tender Pete. Glad you’re safe from the heat. I too have become susceptible to excessive heat and humidity and understand the symptoms and consequences all too well. Stay safe, autumn sailing is getting closer.
  6. Howdy, Here in Williamsburg this summer has been hot and humid especially in the garage. The fans have helped but there’s no workaround for the humidity and thus far and little progress has been made until recently. A familiar voice of reason spoke out suggesting an A/C window unit which I found on Craigslist for cheap. It has been a humongous improvement in the working conditions as well as boosting morale and keeping my iced tea from melting! I had a challenge getting first two bulkheads to fit but after conferring with Alan and other sailing friends I was able to come up with a combination solution of additional wires and inward tensioning using para-cord. I was careful to use mild tension on the para-cord to close gap between hull and bulkheads keeping aware concave deflection on outer hull. Fillets and glassing Blkhds 1&2 are completed, awaiting overnight cure and then proceeding upwards and onwards to next stages.
  7. Excellent suggestions which I’ll take for action from both individuals. I surely appreciate your input and grateful for the support, remarkable forum!
  8. Thanks for the suggestions, So far its mostly been a me, myself and I project since wife works full time and kids have emptied the nest. I’ve had to think/ plan ahead and come up with alternative ways however family and neighbors will assist in the 3D unfolding which I’ll be certain to document.
  9. I’m about to begin attaching the longitudinal stringers to the hull sides and bottom. I’ve pre-drilled and attached block and drywall screws on outboard side. My question is how do you recommend positioning the plywood while applying the epoxy filler, vertically or horizontally? Initially I had the plywood piece hanging vertically so I could work both sides, but wanted see if there’s a better way? Todd
  10. Thanks for doing the leg work just the same, I’ll do my utmost to follow the instructions and fabricate. What master length piece do you suggest working with?
  11. That’s so darn salty and nautical looking I can almost hear your boat creaking happily and wavelets tinkle the hull as a loon calls out on a cool evening! Toll 8 bells and break out the banjo!
  12. Ok Sports Fans; One time as a young Petty Officer I was asked by a crusty old Master Chief, “How would I go about eating an elephant?”. The answer, plainly enough has been incorporated into my ethos and one of my watchwords. Just the same, thank you for saying the encouraging thoughts. Although Im physically alone during this build, I can state with confidence I feel more connected to the collective consciousness of boat builders far and wide. This has been a goal/dream since a cold January day in Holland, Michigan back in 2004. Im at the point where I’m finger scarfing the sheer strake which got me started on the whole Center of Buoyancy question. I must admit I enjoy talking theories and developing scenarios to apply them. Any rate after sleeping on it and chewing on the idea I did a rough calculation which showed there’s not nearly the significant amount to affect buoyancy thus change the stability curve. I estimated 4 cu/ft of volume within the cockpit coaming/sheer strake area. The equation shows a result of 1138.5 Newton’s of force with 256 lbs of displaced fluid. Initially I found this interesting however as Alan stated earlier the water ballast however is by far the largest determinant factor. Further observation is location, location, location. That amount of force is seemingly a good thing but is it in the desired location? As mentioned above, just how would it play out if the boat turns turtle, la saman Allah. I’ve learned in other reading where buoyancy placed incorrectly had negative and fatal results. So as it stands I’m doning respirator, goggles, gloves and headphones, (PPE) and recommencing sanding ops. On a final note I’m finding the random orbital sander used together with the 1/4 sheet oscillating sander does a good job fairing the scarfs. KIWTG. No relation just a salty old Jack.
  13. So today I’ve taken the opportunity and have been scarfing the finger joints using drywall screws and nylon peel-ply. The first scarf was pretty messy with excess putty but it seems I’m getting dialed into better techniques as I proceeded along. I’m a wee concerned about this boat fitting fully in the garage but grasping shes longer in single dimension, nevertheless it’ll be close. I’m planning to go 3D next week or so as I time and tide allow for. While the epoxy was drying today I had time to think and read through the plans until a loose marble lodged itself in my noggin seeding a thought to share. The long stowage space behind the cockpit combing seems great for stowing oars, however What if it were sealed chamber? I’m considering the inherent buoyancy of an air bladder or several XL sized pool noodles, conceptually to improve capsize “right-ability”. My question for discussion is would the provided volume in the cockpit combing to adequately increase the center of buoyancy while capsized? I haven’t started a volume calculation which would begin me calculating buoyancy to see if the center of buoyancy would move further away from CG? B = ρ * V * g https://www.omnicalculator.com/physics/buoyancy#buoyant-force-equation I humbly admit I ‘ain’t no NA, and I’m somewhat lousy at physics and quite possibly adding any buoyancy might/could have a negative effect, causing masts to angle ever further downward increasing possibility to turn turtle? Well it’s these thoughts which will put me to sleep tonight, hopefully.
  14. Hi Pete, I really like your paint scheme, what paint brand did you use and type of gray paint the in the cockpit? It appears the color would be soft on the eyes on a sunny day and not be too hot.
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