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Kennneee

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Kennneee last won the day on December 24 2018

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About Kennneee

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    Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

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  1. I just started gluing my Spindrift 9 together yesterday. This is a great way to build a boat. Never had pre-cut parts before. Wow, sure makes building easy!
  2. Casey- Your work looks amazing! Ken
  3. Alan- This not fair. I am almost done with Rosie and now I want a CS20. Cut it out! Beautiful work! Ken
  4. Moving it around from Rosie’s stern might be a challenge but I am sure I can come up with a way to do it. I would love to be able to use a 2.5HP for both purposes but have some doubts that it will be enough grunt to move the OB26. When Graham has some input on how the 2.5 works on the OB20, I might feel more confident going that route.
  5. Starboard- How heavy is the motor? The J24 is pretty close to the same weight as Rosie and that amount of power should be plenty. Don’t tell Graham you have that much power on the Spindrift:).
  6. Graham- I see that Yamaha and Suzuki have 2.5hp engines that are around 40lbs. One of those sound like a good compromise solution. There are 15”and 20” shafts available. The 20’ would probably be best for Rosie and I would guess the 15”for the Kendrift. Which one makes sense to you? Ken
  7. Alan- Any guess how much horsepower would it would take to move her under reasonable conditions? If I could have a motor that is not to large for the dinghy but big enough to move Rosie I would be pleased, An electric motor is intriguing. Ken
  8. Hi Yawl- My Outerbanks 26 has one means of propulsion, a Yamaha 90. I know this is a reliable motor but all mechanical things can fail. If I had a sail I wouldn’t be overly concerned about the possibility of the motor crapping out. So, the logical thing is to have a kicker motor, right? A kicker is great if you are going to use it regularly for slow speed trolling and as a reliable back up if the main motor fails. In my case, I don’t expect to do much trolling and a kicker would only have value as a back up motor. If motors sit unused they are not always reliable. So, spending a couple of thousand dollars for a kicker for the rare occurrence of a motor failure is a tough one to swallow. I will start building a Spindrift 9 as a dinghy for Rosie. I plan to have a lifting crane to get the dinghy and small motor off and on the pilot house quickly. I have had engineless sailing friends that used their dinghies as a “yawl boat”. Lash the dinghy along side and use the small motor to push the boat along. Any thought on my using the Spindrift in this way? Am I being pennywise and pound foolish? Any input appreciated. Ken
  9. Thanks Mike! HI All- Since launching Rosie in June my work progress slowed quite a bit. When given the choice between working and going out on the water, I chose the water. I can't say enough good things about this boat. The more I use her the more I appreciate her design. She is a total joy on the water, looks great and is economical to run. Her lines are a constant source of attention which can be fun sometimes but when tied to a dock can get in the way of relaxation ( I must admit I mostly love it but don't tell anyone). I put her back in the boat shed at the end of September and took off for a few weeks of travel. Since returning I have gotten a lot of loose ends complete. As we know a boat is never finished but she is awfully close. I am heading south again for the Winter and probably won't do much more until I return. It is down to the small stuff like installing a VHF, a few bits of trim and paint. At Graham's suggestion I bought a set of trim tabs. Rosie planes effortlessly without them and rides beautifully. The only time I notice anything slightly bothersome is when there are 4 on board and 3 are are on one side in a beam wind. Trim tabs will correct that. I have them sitting in the shop waiting for me to install them in the Spring. Below there is the link to my build pictures with written descriptions. I added a bunch today to show the interior details. Using the boat for a few months helped me to tweak a few things. Luanne and I both wanted to sit higher than the original way we set her up. In the pics you will see my solution which works great. A lot of 3am. design work on that one. I have includes 2 photos of Rosie under weigh taken by an admirer on another boat. We met later and he sent me these. https://goo.gl/photos/ Cheers, Ken
  10. HI All- Since launching Rosie in June my work progress slowed quite a bit. When given the choice between working and going out on the water, I chose the water. I can't say enough good things about this boat. The more I use her the more I appreciate her design. She is a total joy on the water, looks great and is economical to run. Her lines are a constant source of attention which can be fun sometimes but when tied to a dock can get in the way of relaxation ( I must admit I mostly love it but don't tell anyone). I put her back in the boat shed at the end of September and took off for a few weeks of travel. Since returning I have gotten a lot of loose ends complete. As we know a boat is never finished but she is awfully close. I am heading south again for the Winter and probably won't do much more until I return. It is down to the small stuff like installing a VHF, a few bits of trim and paint. At Graham's suggestion I bought a set of trim tabs. Rosie planes effortlessly without them and rides beautifully. The only time I notice anything slightly bothersome is when there are 4 on board and 3 are are on one side in a beam wind. Trim tabs will correct that. I have them sitting in the shop waiting for me to install them in the Spring. Below there is the link to my build pictures with written descriptions. I added a bunch today to show the interior details. Using the boat for a few months helped me to tweak a few things. Luanne and I both wanted to sit higher than the original way we set her up. In the pics you will see my solution which works great. A lot of 3am. design work on that one. I have includes 2 photos of Rosie under weigh taken by an admirer on another boat. We met later and he sent me these. https://goo.gl/photos/ Cheers, Ken
  11. Carter- Your boat looks great! There are a lot of things yet to finish but you can stand back and see a beautiful creation as it will look in the water. Looking forward to seeing her as she gets closer to launch. Does she have a name yet? Ken
  12. When you are in the thick of it the natural thing to do is obsess over the details. Probably a good thing for the most part. I obsessed over the chine edges and spoke to Alan about it. Long story short, I compromised and sharpened the aft edge at the transom and put a slight radius on the sides. Rosie gets up on plane effortlessly and is very fuel efficient. Perhaps the extra effort to round the chines would have been worthwhile but I doubt it would have been noticeable to me. One of the hardest things to decide on any big project is how much time you want to spend on some of the details. Perfect is the enemy of the good. I repeat that every day.
  13. Egbert- Don’t write off the 4 blade yet. The one I got is a bit small in diameter and it isn’t a fair comparison. I am going to try one more and I will let you know how it goes. Ken
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