Jump to content

Does anyone have a link or "one stop" site to acquire these items...


thull
 Share

Recommended Posts


Hi, 

Have you tried Glen-L for the hardware? http://www.glen-l.com/inboard-hardware/

They have a bunch of uncommon stuff for mounting inboards and rudders.  However, I bought my hardware from them for an inboard 20 years ago so I don't know what their current reputation is on hardware.  They are very good for plans. 

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The drawing you've shown (Atkins?) shows a number of pieces that wouldn't be recommended on new builds, simply because the quality isn't what it once was. For example, the "galvanized iron tiller". Yeah, tough stuff, but try to find a real hunk of galvanized iron, I mean real hot dipped galvanized iron. Second is the choice of galvanized iron - really? This leads me to assume the rudder shaft and possibly the rudder are also galvanized iron? There are worse material choices, but not many, comparatively. As to finding some of these materials, well, again, we use different methods, materials and techniques, so older designs need to be "upgraded" to address the availability of some of these things.

 

Boat building is as much "engineering on the fly" when problems arise, as it is problem solving, when stuck on some issue. We're not kidding, when glib comments about moaning chair time is necessary. It may be a bit metaphoric, but it's an accurate assessment about working through the barrage of issues, that can bombard a build. 

 

As to searching parts and bits and pieces. Many can be home built, though this does require additional skill sets, such as welding, metal fabrication, etc. In most every area there's going to be a "fabrication" shop. Typically these are a welding shop, where someone fixes everyone's broken trailers, hay wagons, driveway gates, feed tanks, etc. Make friends with these guys, because they can get stuff you simply can't. If you need some aluminum tube for a mast, they can order it for you, if you need a custom bow roller for an anchor, they can weld one up in an afternoon, that fits your boat dead bang, not just close, like a store bought unit, probably cheaper too.

 

Rudder and prop shafts are usually custom, though you can often just pick through a pile of old shafts to find one "close enough". I've made many dozens of rudders over the years and it's not hard, though often can test my welding ability (which isn't great). In the end, you'll have to make it yourself, such as the keel/skeg shoe or pay someone to make it for you, as there's no such thing as a manufacture that makes keel shoes, just the material to make keel shoes out of. Speaking of this shoe, it's nothing more than a hunk of metal, cut to shape. Seems simple, but cutting 1/2" steel or iron isn't easy, so consider renting a plasma cutter to get the job done. Personally, I would never put iron or steel, unless stainless, under a boat. Just way too many potential maintenance issues to contend with down the road. 

 

In the end, you'll find the best builders are really serious scroungers. They'll see, find, steal or borrow services, parts and material sources for just about everything, from sailmakers that can build good, durable, relatively economical sails, that draw well, to old boat boneyards where they can hunt from an old set of throttle controls (as an example), for the 50 year old runabout they're working on. I just came from one, because of a "tinny" I'm working on, that needs a set of shift controls. I didn't find exactly what I need, but did find a set of controls that I can modify to work well, in the space I have available for it. I showed up, they know me and all I had was a tool box and a set of hand drawn dimensions, the controls need to fit. What I found was a little too big, but by removing the base, likely making a new one, I can make it work. It's almost dumpster diving at times, but with a little polish and elbow grease, this set of controls will look brand new and perfectly fitted.

 

Lastly, the better moaning chair setups have a small end table next to them. This is where you place your beer or scotch, as you wipe the tears from your eyes, cuss about the plans not being clear enough and contemplate suicide or eventual project completion. On this end table, you'll have coffee stained plans and sketches of modifications, etc. They'll be pretty wrinkled up after a while, from being crumpled up in frustration over several "events", but they'll still be readable when you get calmed down, once the beer starts to kick in, to mellow your tolerance of errors. In fact, I'm a strong believer in beer drinking when fairing a hull. You'll find you have much more acceptance of little humps and dips in the surface, if a few ounces of single malt are shading your rose colored glasses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You forgot about the pile of To-Do lists on the table, PAR, the ones that seem to just keep writing themselves. Other than that you're spot on, poetic even. Except stainless. I don't even use that kind of steel.

And, this moaning chair gets used a lot more if you're the idiot who designed the stupid boat you can't figure out how to build. Ask how I know that...

Coffee. Or water. Always with the coffee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahhh, PAR, you must not be native born Southern country. (Of course, Florida is not really southern.) Sweet tea is nectar -of-the-gods. Actually, even nectar from the of the God of the Bible. It is the liquid form of the manna that God gave the Israelites as they wandered 40 years in the desert. Sometimes I have those wilderness experiences in my boat building experiences...

 

By-the-way, I lived in St. Pete for my early years---from a few months old until about 35 years old, so I know of what I speaketh...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

   Thull,

   As Paul has suggested it may be difficult to find galvanized steel, etc. but Stainless may be a good substitute.  I don't know where you are located but there are a number of online metal suppliers.  McMaster Carr is one if you're in the USA and there's online metals (onlinemetals.com?)  Prices are pretty high at McMaster Carr but convenience is pretty high too.  I can't remember what the prices are like at online metals.

   Hopefully someone else will chime in with better suppliers.

   There is also the option of poking around at a scrapyard but you won't be able to tell for sure what metal you're dealing with (316 is better than 304 in Stainless Steel for boat applications, etc.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are almost always scrapyards/metal recyclers in your area. Also, try welding supply places, or a local metal smith/welder or machine shop. Bribery and regular patronage usually assist you in getting good stuff...

Vocational high school/trade school/university. Check industrial arts, theatre arts, or art arts. Lots of metal there, and people who can do stuff with it. They cast bronze and other metals at the university near me for art, and some people will cast stuff for a little dough and the experience.

Seems like most of the stuff you're looking for could be made differently, too, if you're building with modern methods anyway.

Oh, some community education (night school, what-have-you) have classes to teach you skills while you make your own project. Around here they hold wood and metal working classes, for a nominal fee, in local high school shops.

And, I really like non ferrous metal for the under watery bits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

   So whether you're fer or agin tea, beer or vodka or any other relaxing beverage in the moaning chair, this thread is an attempt to find metal supplies for boat building.  I find that it can be quite frustrating to find just the right amount of just the right material for a project.  Procurement is so much less fun (for me at least) than cutting and shaping and gluing.  I know I've recently whined pretty loudly about the gluing part of a project but I still hate the procurement part (and yes, my whining was enhanced by tea or beer or vodka).

   Thull, if we're not supplying the right information please feel free to elaborate on your needs.  We may not have interpreted your questions correctly.

   Where are you, what boat are you building and specifically which parts are you searching for?  We're interested in helping (especially if you promise to post pictures as you progress).  If you're in PAR's neck of the woods you'll be hard pressed to find hot galvanized steel but if you're in my neighborhood there are any number of businesses that will hot galv a part so heavily that you won't recognize it (speaking from experience).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thull,

Here is a link to an outfit that sells all kinds of metals on the internet http://www.onlinemetals.com/index.cfm

Their prices were very competitive when I was looking for aluminum tubes to make the masts on the Sharpie I built. When it comes to fabricating stuff out of metal I end up using high strength epoxy and stainless bolts.  I never learned to weld and the epoxy and bolts have worked well for me (a trailer, an electric pickup, and a powered trailer dolly).  When using epoxy with metals you need to have the surfaces perfectly clean - 600 grit emery cloth and several washings with acetone. 

Tom

 

P.S. After 35 years of building and re-building (aka fixing stupid mistakes - such as using polyester resin and glass on plywood) boats I am on my third moaning chair; and it has to be a single malt Scotch! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

WTH???  Thought I had already replied to this thread....how rude!!  Anyway thanks for the responses...as a time saver I figured I could just order these parts and slap them on when I reached that stage...evidently from the replies it will be more practical to fabricate myself which is fine...I have welder, torches, etc and a metal scrap yard next to my office.

 

I am proceeding with the build of a Atkins design (1938) "Huskie" which will fit my current needs...I pick up my wood package tomorrow that I had ordered a month ago...pretty much the entire boat will be built with 7/8" cypress.... of course once I get going in earnest, I'll start a build thread which everyone can critique as I go along...right now the wood will have to season a few months....

 

Just realized the PAR is within a 1/2 hr drive of my location......may have to gather some refreshments and pay him a visit shortly...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.