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Greg Luckett

Princess Sharpie 26 Interior layouts

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I have seen the PS22 layouts of the boats already built and/or being built, and some proposals for the PS28, but nothing for the PS26 other than the suggestions on B&B's web site.  Am I the only one currently planning to build the PS26?  I do have the plan set and need to review its interior suggestions, but I am always eager to see what other folks have come up with.

Thanks! :)

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Now if Congress would alter the laws so we could beuild it wider and still trailer it....

Ray, Actually most states (including Maine) allow trailer widths up to 8'-6". See the link below. It seems like all the coastal states allow 8'-6" trailers.

http://www.boatus.com/trailerclub/laws.asp

The state restrictions that allow only 8'-0" are over-ridden on the federal highway system which has the 8'-6" limit. I understand that this is generally interpreted to include access facilities, so you won't be arrested for getting off the freeway to get gas.

This is the reason that I am pursuing the 28' x 8'-6" Princess 28 design.

http://www.pbase.com/sailrosita/princess28

82327674.jpg

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This was part of what caused my question to Ray as to how wide his possible changes would have made the boat.  Six excess inches is darn hard for anyone to measure on a boat on a trailer, so 8 ft or 8ft 6in does not really matter.  Heck, it could probably be 9 or so ft and still not be noticed.  If the boat has been lengthened from 22 to 26 feet but still essentially the same beam, widening the beam a foot would not be noticable.  I need to pull out the PS26 plan set and see what its beam is.

Just my thoughts from having driven for over 40 years. :)

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6 inches or a foot,  the length still trumps if you want two pilot berths.

For myself I have resigned to stock layout. 

The majority of the attributes of the boat overide my other desires.

I must have misunderstood your earlier comments, Ray?  I thought the length was not in issue but rather the beam for your dream layout.  That was my reason for asking how wide it would need to go to meet that dream.  I wonder if Pilgrim is to the stock layout?  I know Travis has talked about it before but I cannot recall now.  The B&B website talks about being able to modify or finalize the interiors, which I believe is true.  It always comes down to compromises, as we all know.  This is what started me thinking that I had better get busy deciding my PS26 interior if I plan to start construction sometime next year.  Thank you for your input; I will certainly keep it in mind. :)

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Yes- the Pilgrim is a stock layout. Graham shows two - Pilgrim has the head forward and a pair of settee berths.

The settees were raised an inch as was the cabin top, in deference to Travis's bad knees.

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Raising the settee height an inch has the effect of reducing the hanging effect of the lower legs?  I am wondering if I should also consider that aspect?  Was the height then determined by a measurement from the heel to the back of the knee?  When I shop for chairs I sit in several different ones until finding something that fits comfortably but at this point do not know why exactly some feel better to me than others.  Another thing to explore and learn about  :) 

Thanks for the advice and help! :)

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:D- well, the inch was sorta abitrary. If you raise them much more you start to get complicated with the deck under side and room to lay down on the berths. Even at an inch up that starts to get tight aft. So to go up any more would require raising the deck which entails making the topsides wider, etc. You begin to really get into areas of lots of change, which I didn't want to do. So I raised an inch just to help Travis out a bit, then raised the actual cabin top the same amount ( and curved it a bit which Graham noticed immediately ;D)

It's all trade offs as I've said before.

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I know a number of designers and each one, can instantly recognize the shapes they've drawn. As you develop a design, the lines get moved, adjusted, thought about, re-adjusted and moved some more, until they've found their home. These lines have an intimate relationship with the designer, who has carefully carved and placed them. This was especially true of hand done drawings, much like an artist's oil painting. With computers, I don't quite get the same feeling of intimacy that I did with hand penned work. I often still hand draw certain lines, then scan them, like lining off a hull for lapped planking. A similar feeling of closeness to the work is felt when lofting too.

You could take a stack of station molds, lean them against a wall, with just part of one peeking out from the rest and the person that designed those stations, could tell you which one was sticking out of the pile of molds. They could also tell you how they arrived at that shape, the attributes it will provide the hull, possibly how many times that particular section was re-shaped to accommodate one thing or another, etc.

I got to see some pictures of a 26' powerboat of my design a few days ago (including cookies from his wife, in the package). The hull shell, decks and cabin have been completed and I instantly noticed the sheer was raised a little. He didn't mention this in our phone conversations, but though it was only an inch and a half, it struck me as a sore thumb. He didn't think I'd notice and had a running bet if I would, with his wife. He lost and now I'm getting more home made cookies on him.

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I bought one of the first PS26 plan sets, years ago, then put it on hold. Perhaps it is time to reconsider it?  My foremost question is how difficult might it be to single hand?  How is the PS22 for single handing? It looks like I will mostly be trailering and single handing, having given up on my family sharing my love for sailing.

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Hey Greg,

If you want a head start, I've got the tiller, centerboard, and rudder all ready to go.  Shipping from Connecticut to Michigan shouldn't be that bad.

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The size of a boat really has little to do with single-handing.  It is a matter of how it is rigged and can you get to and adjust everything by yourself.  I single-handed my 27' sloop rigged Renegade with a 135 Genoa.  I would even reef the main under sail solo without heaving to.   I can't imagine a cat/ketch too large to single-hand.

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