Jump to content

Fishman38

fishman38 OK20

Recommended Posts

Yes,I would plank the bottom before installing the side stringers again.  It made the bottom much easier to access.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2179-0-22234700-1373073242_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-12906900-1373073270_thumb.jpg

 

Miyot I'm trying to figure out how you cut those neat, shallow angles at the keel..........handsaw?  With the piece clamped in place and using the keel as a guide?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2179-0-58265100-1373137597_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-51651700-1373137625_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-12554000-1373137656_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-45558300-1373137681_thumb.jpg

 

I tried the sawz-all.  Thought about the chain saw and quickly ruled that out.

If I had known it would come to this this handsaw would have gotten a sharpening last week!

I think had I planned a little better I could have made this cut with the radial arm saw.  Will try that on the other side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same problem with a build of mine and found the power planner was an acceptable way of removing a lot of excess material like that.

Looks like you suffer from every back yard boat builder......lack of room in our sheds?

Trev. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't want to try to build anything bigger in there.  It (the shop) is 25 x 30 but lots of tools, stuff,etc,etc to work around.  Actually the handsaw worked OK, just should have made sure it was sharp.  I cut that bevel with the radial arm saw for the stbd side.  Think it's gonna work out ok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted ImageDSCN0375.JPGPosted ImageDSCN0376.JPG

 

Miyot I'm trying to figure out how you cut those neat, shallow angles at the keel..........handsaw?  With the piece clamped in place and using the keel as a guide?

Sorry, I've been on vacation.  A jack plane is all you need here.  A power planer would be dangerous, to much chance of digging to deep.  These bevels can be cut quickly with the jack plane.  The first 8 ft. panel takes less than 15 min.  The opposite  bevel on the keel is your guide.  Its one of the easiest parts of the build.  Your plane has to be sharp and the ply dulls it quickly.  I can do an 8ft bevel in under 10 min.  Finish up with a small spoke shave if you have to.  Just let the plane ride on the keel bevel.  You know your close to finished when you start touching the keel.   All the panels are done this way.

 

The bevels are cut after the panel is glued in place.  Simple and quick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often manage to find the hard way to do things. <_< Actually the bigger problem for me is getting the rough cut close enough so that the bevel can be cut with a plane in a reasonable time.  As you can see in the above pics this time I missed by a "mile".  Haven't done much transferring of shapes to make a pattern (lofting?).  I'm working on it.  No doubt you're right about gluing before cutting the bevel.  Thanks for the input. Sounds like a nice vacation you had.  I'm going to be taking off from boat building for a week of fishing in Canada in a week or so.  Kind of hate to miss that time working on the boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2660-0-60909300-1373246561_thumb.jpgMy  bottom is two layers.  The first layer goes on and is beveled (say port side).  Then the other side of the bottom (starboard side) is fit and glued  and it is beveled.  Then the second layer of planking goes on, first port   side glued and beveled then starboard, glued and beveled.  Each layer has to be alternated for maximum strength along the joint.  Which is actually a little scarf joint.  Just fit your plank and draw a line along the apex of the keel onto the plank.  Cut close to the line but leave the line and just cut it square.  Now after gluing this plank in position you are just planing off to the bevel on the keel or the underlying plank. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peel ply question:  So given the curves on the Ocracoke 20 does one just use the peel ply on the appropriate surfaces, leave the rest and plan to do more sanding etc on those places?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, the fun part.  I used peel ply on the entire hull.  It is a pain but worth it.  Roll the peel ply onto a stick, wet out your glass then roll on the peel ply after completing a section.  Here are the problems I ran into. 

It won't lay around a curve so you have to dart it.  Say at the stem or the aft corners at the transom.  Some darts work well and others don't.  Some darts overlap each other.  This is ok.  However at the end of the dart you may get a bubble in the peel ply.  If you can fix it, good.  But don't spend a lot of time messing with it.  Leave the bubble.  Later when you remove the peel ply it is easy to just lay in a little epoxy and lay on a small square of peel ply.  Fixed perfect in just a minute.  Other darts will remain open, let them.  Cut a small sheet just big enough to cover the spot and lay it on the open dart.  Leave some edge of the peel ply free so you can grab it and peel it off after the epoxy cures.

 

When darting, cut a nice clean edge.  A rough edge will get epoxied to the hull.  You can get it off but will have to sand off some of the fibers of the peel ply that stick to the hull.  No big deal as you have to sand a little on a darted area because it leaves a little ridge.  You have to sand off any small areas of peel ply thread stuck to the hull as it has a release on it that could affect future adhesion.  This is easy as if your careful there won't be much.  

 

Try not to stretch your peel ply while laying it down.  You end up doing this a little any how as you smooth the peel ply out.  After removing the peel ply you will find a few small wrinkles or humps in your surface here and there where a small wrinkle formed.  You usually don't notice these if they are small.  These imperfections sand out easily as its not the glass that wrinkles but the peel ply.  The resin is sucked into the wrinkle under the peel ply causing a lump the exact shape of the wrinkle.  You usually get these on the more curved areas but will get some on the flat as well.  The peel ply must be perfectly smooth as you can make it.  Any wrinkle or even a fold mark in the peel ply cloth will be printed onto your hull surface.

 

Wet out your glass well enough before adding the peel ply as it will suck up some of the resin.  I ran into a little problem with my lay up.  I used 17 oz bi axial.  I did the transom first and it is nearly perfect.  Took my time.  However your time is limited by yourself so you are hurrying doing larger areas.  I got a lot of small pin holes in my surface caused by not wetting out quite enough.  Let me explain.  The glass was whetted out nicely with no dry areas.  I rolled out the peel ply.  Which absorbs some of the resin.  Then wet out the peel ply.  In bi axial glass there are little ropes that hold everything together.  A small bubble formed on each side of the ropes in areas.  These roll out and disappear when releasing the air with the ribbed roller, as they did on the transom.  But if you are just a hair short on resin they will reappear later or you can't get them to roll out.  Adding resin to the peel ply doesn't work as not enough resin will go through it to fix the problem.  You would have to peel back the peel ply and add a little resin to the glass to fix the problem.  Time was short on the lay up and being inexperienced I let it go because the bubbles were so small and only appearing in small areas I didn't think it was a real problem.

 

After removing the peel ply I have patches of small pin holes.  VERY small pin holes.  Rolling on a coat of epoxy doesn't fix them.  So I was stuck fixing pin holes for a day.  I used micro balloons and resin and had to force it into the pin holes with a hard plastic squeege.  Extra work I could have avoided.  These pin holes were not deep and did not go to the hull surface.  They were about as deep as half the diameter of the ropes or threads holding the weave together.  But would not fill by just rolling resin on as a fill coat.  They would reappear after.

 

Two thin coats of epoxy after removing the peel ply was enough for sanding without hitting the glass (although I did barely touch the glass in a few spots).  These were applied back to back to avoid sanding in between.  I got a nice smooth surface.  Then I did some fairing and patching and fixed the pin holes.  Rolled on two more very thin coats of epoxy and will sand it smooth today.  Almost ready for paint.  I don't like getting ready for paint and my finish will show how much.  Hope this give you a little insight.  From one beginner to another.

                                                                                                                                                                                 Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miyot, thanks for the very comprehensive primer on using peel ply.  I printed it so as to have it readily available when the time comes. I do have a question or two:

 

I gather that it's "use one time and discard"?  So I'll need at least enough to cover the entire exterior surface of the boat, right? 

 

From what I've read It seems there is more than one type of peel ply.  Is there a specific type I should order? 

 

Can you suggest a supplier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use once and throw away.  I got mine from US Composites.  Get the release fabric.  Not the vacuum or perforated kind.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2179-0-84908900-1378346279_thumb.jpg

Getting close to finishng the bottom planking and installing the chine flat.  Haven't seen many if any discussions of shaping, fitting and installing the chine flat.  I've studied the pics in the Lance of NZ OC20 build and those of Miyot's OC24 build and have some ideas of how to proceed but would welcome any tips/cautions in this part of the project. 

 

For one thing it seems that stitch and glue techniques between the frames would be useful.

 

Also so far I've ended the bottom planks at the bottom (top actually)of the chine log.  It seems that beginning at the forward end of the chine flat the bottom planks must stop about halfway down the chine log to allow room to anchor the side planks.

 

Any suggestions appreciated.

 

J.O.

 

PS: Sorry about the fuzzy picture,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottom planks continue to the stem the same way as they do aft, to the top of the chine batten.  A 1/2 inch rebate is then cut in the bottom planking so the side planking ends up flush with the bottom planking just aft of the stem.  I started my rebate about 8 or 9 inches aft of the stem.  This way your chine flat makes a smooth transition and just disappears just aft of the stem.  I believe it is explained in your planking instruction page.  I mentioned to you a small rebate plane would be nice to have.  

 

Remember to keep any fastenings near the stem low (towards the bottom of the boat) so they won't interfere with cutting the 1/2 inch rebate.  Start by drawing a line parallel with the top of the bottom planking 1/2 inch below the top of the bottom planks.  Start where your chine flat ends and extend the line to the very tip of the stem.  Then use a back saw or Japanese saw to cut a shallow kerf along the line you drew.  Then pare off a shaving with a chisel.  That way your rebate plane will have a shoulder to ride against as you cut your rebate.  Your rebate will taper down to nothing at the stem, cutting completely through your bottom planks at the stem exposing the stem itself.  Your side planking will then glue to the  side of the chine flat, continuing down the rebate and coming flush with the bottom planking near the stem.  post-2660-0-58282200-1378384575_thumb.jpg

 

Your rebate starts out the full thickness of the bottom planks and gradually gets deeper as you approach the stem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave;  I had read the "planking" page a few months back but had forgotten that there was some info on the chine flat in there.  However in the version I have there is no mention of the rabbet that you describe.  So thanks for filling that in for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slow progress this summer, largely due to family obligations, an eleven day trip to Red Lake Ontario (Canada) for a week of very good walleye fishing and other prior obligations, not to mention being limited to 5 or 6 hrs per work day due fatigue.  Here are the most recent pictures:

 

post-2179-0-39479100-1379281399_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-44956800-1379281426_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-01940100-1379281454_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-38178500-1379281480_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.