Jump to content

Fishman38

fishman38 OK20

Recommended Posts

Thanks Dave; Actually that bevel was a bit of a problem.  I've yet to come up with a quick way to estimate the size of the rough cut to accommodate it (the bevel) and wasn't willing to take the time to do it the long, accurate way.  Long story short I was a little shy on a couple of the inside panels and it took a little thickened epoxy to fill the voids.  Cosmetic issue only, no compromise of the strength.  I'm pleased with the way it's going together so far.  I purposely didn't get too close with the camera :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had to settle for a shot of vodka along with the shot of PP.  Not much of a hand for rum but may have to convert before I finish this boat!

Thanks Dale.  Sail on!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dry fitting the intermediate sheer while my 85 yr old "understudy" (talk about the blind leading the blind!!!) sands, fairs and fills screw holes in between acting as my third hand in cutting, shaping and otherwise fitting.  Would have the stbd side clamped up too but for the crrrrrraaaak heard as we were torqueing it into place.  Oh well will try again tomorrow.

post-2179-0-74921000-1380321726_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-76277200-1380321829_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-68104600-1380321905_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-66488900-1380322044_thumb.jpg

post-2179-0-30450500-1380322138_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dry fitting the intermediate sheer and side stringers while trying to figure out how to fit the forward end of the chine flat.....I'll let them (stringers and chines) wait while I finish sanding/fairing the bottom and get the chine flats glued up.

 

post-2179-0-56781000-1381026910_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-71537900-1381026881_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-89717800-1381026938_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-38948100-1381026966_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-05827000-1381026994_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-59995600-1381027021_thumb.jpg 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far the most challenging part of the project has been getting the chine flats fitted and glued.  Next time I build it I think I will leave the chine end of the planks a half inch longer, that is so they're flush with the top side the (chine) flat.  I first made a cardboard pattern then used it to rough cut the plywood then scribed the plywood and used the saber saw with the finest blade I could find, set at the (approximate) angle to (approximately) match the slope of the end of the bottom planks, then used rasps, sandpaper etc to improve the fit as best I could.  Not real pleased with the result but think it will be OK, but next time I think I might leave the planks longer and fit to the bottom surface.  post-2179-0-60767400-1382023117_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-89309500-1382023144_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your fit looks good in the photo.  If I understand you right, you cut the edge of your chine flat to match the slope of the bottom planks.  I would think that more difficult than beveling your bottom planks to match the chine flat.  I took a half inch thick piece of scrap ply and just laid it on one of the frames and slid it against the bottom planks.  It will be touching the bottom plank  at the top corner (or bottom corner if the boat was right side up) and a gap will be where the fit is not right.  Then just plane the bottom plank in that spot until your scrap piece of bottom ply fits flush against it.  Do this at each station or frame.  That gives you a start.  They are the most difficult spots because the frame is in the way of a plane so you have to use a chisel.

 

Then use a plane to join these spots together for the full length of the chine on your bottom planks.  You can clamp a batten along the outside of the frames just at the chine and slide your scrap piece of ply along letting it ride against your bottom planks to help you judge how much to plane off the bottom planks for the flat you are creating.  So now you have a flat planed onto the edge of your bottom planks and when you fit your chine flat it should but up nice and square to your bottom planks.  This is a slight winding bevel ( the angle changes from stem to stern).  It is actually easier than it sounds.  So long story short you bevel the bottom planks instead of the chin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your fit looks good in the photo.  If I understand you right, you cut the edge of your chine flat to match the slope of the bottom planks.  I would think that more difficult than beveling your bottom planks to match the chine flat.  I took a half inch thick piece of scrap ply and just laid it on one of the frames and slid it against the bottom planks.  It will be touching the bottom plank  at the top corner (or bottom corner if the boat was right side up) and a gap will be where the fit is not right.  Then just plane the bottom plank in that spot until your scrap piece of bottom ply fits flush against it.  Do this at each station or frame.  That gives you a start.  They are the most difficult spots because the frame is in the way of a plane so you have to use a chisel.

 

Then use a plane to join these spots together for the full length of the chine on your bottom planks.  You can clamp a batten along the outside of the frames just at the chine and slide your scrap piece of ply along letting it ride against your bottom planks to help you judge how much to plane off the bottom planks for the flat you are creating.  So now you have a flat planed onto the edge of your bottom planks and when you fit your chine flat it should but up nice and square to your bottom planks.  This is a slight winding bevel ( the angle changes from stem to stern).  It is actually easier than it sounds.  So long story short you bevel the bottom planks instead of the chine.

 

post-2660-0-17106500-1382047416_thumb.jpg  I think you can see the flat or bevel planed on the bottom planks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miyot, I thought about doing it (sort of) the way you describe but there were a couple of problems:  one was that cutting the bevel on the planks did seem to me to be the harder way to do it since I'm not real swift with hand planes; then there was the problem of working around the frames.  Also, by the time I thought of it I had already rough cut the flats with a beveled edge and if I understand it correctly they would have had to be cut about a half inch wider to do it your way; I was all out of 1/2 inch ply and  would have had to drive to Denver and spend $120 on another sheet of half inch Okoume.  Bottom line though, your way is probably the best way if one thinks far enough ahead.

 

Carolina Flare, doing it the way I did it there is still plenty of gap to fill with thickened epoxy :) I have a little trouble accepting that the strength of the joint would not be diminished the wider the gap, although a couple layer of FG on both sides of the joint I'm sure would probably provide plenty of strength.  BTW, thanks for the attaboy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a couple of the schemes I used to lock the flat in place 'til the glue set:

Posted ImageDSCN0617.JPGPosted ImageDSCN0618.JPG

I like the one with the screws.  Being in a hurry, I fooled around and used clamps.  One side slipped (the same spot your screw clamp is in) after I had left the shop and so is glued slightly out of alignment.  It still bothers me.  If I look for it I can see it.  

 

I have not touched my boat in nearly 3 weeks.  I have gone down to the boat with every intention of beginning the next phase of construction.  I walk around a bit and look at things.  Sit in my chair and think and look at the boat and promptly return to the house and watch TV or something.  Complete burnout.  I have managed to reconstruct the wall to the barn so I can heat the shop.  Got my propane tanks filled and did a good cleanup.  I'm ready to start on the inside of the boat.  Perhaps tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far it's when my confidence in knowing what I'm doing gets down that I get like that.  Which will happen again when I get to the interior....so when you start again on yours please take lots of pics!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fishman38, not trying to make you backtrack on your build, but I have a question about your cockpit framing and vertical stiffeners. Would you recommend doing the cockpit framing as you did prior to flipping the boat, even though I realize you haven't flipped it yet. And, I can't quite make out if the vertical stiffeners are 3/4 x 1 or have you rounded them down like a 1/2 round or 3/4 round? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2179-0-83624700-1382572956_thumb.jpgNeeded to deepen some of the stringer slots.  Tried using a round rasp but that became too much like work.  Router worked better.  Carefully.  I actually got this one too deep and had to take evasive action with glue and filler.

post-2179-0-26541800-1382573009_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-33874300-1382573036_thumb.jpg

post-2179-0-26715200-1382573063_thumb.jpgGluing up the stringers.

post-2179-0-66023300-1382573090_thumb.jpgpost-2179-0-26470000-1382573118_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


Supporting Members

Supporting Members can create Clubs, photo Galleries, don't see ads and make messing-about.com possible! Become a Supporting Member - only $12 for the next year. Pay by PayPal or credit card.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.