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Miyot

Ocracoke 24

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There has been a big debate here about the rounded bow,chines and transom. The rounded edges allow the glass flow over the corners better. The rounded edges also helps prevent chipping and trailer rash. I heard that it could hurt performance but I am not sure why. I am going to round the edges and leave them that way. If I have to I will do as you say and add glass and then grind it square. 

Good luck with the glassing. After seeing the rest of your work I am sure the glass will come out perfect!!!!

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No debate in my mind. Test run a powerboat with a round edge transom, then use goo to square it up and test run again. You will a noticeable speed improvement. Only the bottom edge needs to be squared, the rest of the edges are better left with round off.

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Its a little thing called hydrodynamics.   The squared off transom allows the water to break cleanly away from the transom.  A curved trailing edge causes turbulence indicative of  an advanced hydraulic.  This turbulent effect is an inverse ratio of chaos theory duplicity inversion.   If gravity is X = 314.56 then the gravometric  intolerance is influenced by the trailing edge of a nucleoli.  Hence the inversion ratio is dominated by a radiometric process, converted to hydrodynamic instability.  Its easy.   Or it could the the epoxyclips!

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Boy you must have been really smart in another life. I gets it now. With the water moving so quickly be I figured it would have little or no effect. But obviously it does and I will square the trailing edge.

PG

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Hi all,

 

Been lurking on a couple of different sights/forums to gain info and my nerve to tackle my own build.  I came across the process below on an Aussie site and performed a copy/paste.  Hope the original poster won't mind, just thought it'd be helpful info to square up the bottom edge of the transom.  PM me if you want the link to the other build, not looking to ruffle anyones feathers.

 

 The reverse chine is made from a combination of epoxy, flock, glass powder, cabosil and wood flour. A balsa wood and /or cardboard dam is glued onto the hull with C.A. then the mixture is trowelled into place and shaped. After it has set off a bit a mixture of Q cell and epoxy is trowelled over the top to allow for fairing to shape. The base composite mixture is very very hard to sand so if there happens to be any high spots which really should be avoided they can be ground down with a grinder. The cardboard and balsa just sands and chissels off.

 

It is really not to difficult to do and does not need to be glassed over. Make sure you rough up the substrate with 40 grit before you start.

 

I intend to make the strakes and skeg the same way. I will put up photos.

 

To make the glass powder lay up some scraps of DB (Biax) fibreglass onto some spare wood let it cure. Then, up it with the belt sander (40 grit)...Collect the glass and there you have it. You will need to wear protective clothing unless you like the glass imbedded in your skin and lungs.

 

Miyot, exceptional work & craftsmanship!!

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.  This turbulent effect is an inverse ratio of chaos theory duplicity inversion.   If gravity is X = 314.56 then the gravometric  intolerance is influenced by the trailing edge of a nucleoli.  Hence the inversion ratio is dominated by a radiometric process, converted to hydrodynamic instability.  Its easy.   Or it could the the epoxyclips!

 

 

Say what?? :lol:

 

Boat looks great!

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Seal coat and amine blush.  I put a seal coat on before starting glassing.  Weather was great and I started about 9:00 pm.  Rolled on a coat.  About 2 1/2 hrs.  The fumes were a little strong so I opened the door for some air.  It had started to rain and the temp had dropped.  There was no out gassing and the finish looked great so I closed up and went to bed.  Next morning the blush was obvious.  It didn't bother me, I waited until this morning and went down with some water and a scotchbrite and went to work.  

 

No way.  It would not come off.  No matter how hard I scrubbed the water continued to bead on the surface.  I finally resorted to wet sanding.  This did the trick.  Tomorrow I'll go over it and scuff sand a little more and check for areas of beading water and wet sand any spots left.  It had to be scuff sanded anyhow.  But glass adhesion would have been compromised without the wet sanding.   Our weather has been weird.  I'm sure this played a big roll on the blush.  I hung a rack for the glass and peel ply and they are ready.  I'll finish work on the sanding tomorrow and let it sit for a day so it is really dry after the wet sanding.  

 

I'll begin by taping the keel and chines and glassing the transom.  Should be a good warm up for glassing the hull.  Here is a wet out pic.

 

post-2660-0-42052300-1375064329_thumb.jpg

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Miyot, do you mind telling me what you use to "extrude" thickened epoxy for the fillets?  I know there are fillable caulk tubes available somewhere but not here.  I think I can order them from Jamestown Distributors.  If they're the size of a regular caulk tube it seems a pretty large batch to mix and use before it kicks. I have tried using a zip-lock bag with a hole on a corner and it can be done that way but lots of mess and waste and a pretty slow process.  Is there a better way?

 

I assume you're going to paint your boat.  Seems a shame to hide that beautiful woodwork!

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Miyot, do you mind telling me what you use to "extrude" thickened epoxy for the fillets?  I know there are fillable caulk tubes available somewhere but not here.  I think I can order them from Jamestown Distributors.  If they're the size of a regular caulk tube it seems a pretty large batch to mix and use before it kicks. I have tried using a zip-lock bag with a hole on a corner and it can be done that way but lots of mess and waste and a pretty slow process.  Is there a better way?

 

I assume you're going to paint your boat.  Seems a shame to hide that beautiful woodwork!

I just mix up a big batch and as soon as the mixture is right I spread it into a thin layer on a scrap piece of plywood.  I lay it on with a mixing stick.  Once I lay it all on I pull my fillet tool along the seam for the entire fillet.  Then I clean up the edges and use the extra to extend the fillet along the seam.  You soon get the feel for now much to mix up.  I considered the baggie thing but figured it would be a mess.  By the time you get the mixture into a tube,I've got most of the fillet filled.  Then you would have to clean the tube.  I wish there was a better way.  Epoxy is messy and that is the worst part of this build for me.

 

I have begun glassing.  I am taping the chines and keel at this time.  The peel ply is excellent.  I will order some for interior work as well.  I am so pleased with the peel ply that I am going to use it on everything.  It makes a messy job less messy.  Consolidates the cloth, saves a lot of sanding work, removes excess epoxy, makes an amateur job look professional.  Blah blah blah, I like it.

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Peel ply is excellent on the tabbing as well. I am jealous once again that you are putting on the glass and I am Kinda stuck on vacation with the family. Can't wait to see you flipped.

PG

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Dave:

 

Curious if the peel ply has helped with the blush issue?

 

Also, as far as blush is concerned, WEST was the worst offender for doing that of any epoxy I've used. They may have a "no blush" hardener, but of the fast and slow hardeners I used, both left serious blush.

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Dave:

 

Curious if the peel ply has helped with the blush issue?

 

Also, as far as blush is concerned, WEST was the worst offender for doing that of any epoxy I've used. They may have a "no blush" hardener, but of the fast and slow hardeners I used, both left serious blush.

From everything I've read, when you peel off the peel ply it takes the blush with it.  I'm leaving the peel ply on to avoid contamination until I'm ready to put the big pieces of glass on the boat.  I'll report on the blush after peel ply comes off.  I should be ready to fit the big glass pieces tomorrow, but will glass the transom first..  The peel ply was difficult to use on the stem or forefoot.  You had to dart it to get it to lay where it makes a bend.  It still isn't perfect, with a few gaps and wrinkles here and there.  These places will need some sanding and messing with when the peel comes off.   But it sure makes the layup nice.

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Wiping off the surfaces epoxied with a wet cloth is all it takes to remove blush.  Even if it looks like the peel ply has removed it, why chance there is some behind when it is so easy to be sure?

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Wiping off the surfaces epoxied with a wet cloth is all it takes to remove blush.  Even if it looks like the peel ply has removed it, why chance there is some behind when it is so easy to be sure?

I agree.  Even so called blush free epoxies can still leave a blush.  To much to loose, so give it a wipe down. 

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I'm not sure what a port bracket is.  The engine will be bolted to the transom.  I have never liked bracket boats nor do I think much of jack plates.  I will spend some time making sure the engine is at the right height and propped right.  I have found a dealer and will order the outboard in a couple weeks.  Yamaha 150 four stroke.

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Sorry, typo....porta bracket (http://www.portaproducts.com/index.php?page=porta-bracket), similar to a jack plate.  I'm torn, love the functionality (more room in the back of the boat) but prefer the traditional look of mounting on the transom.  With the designed transom (one layer around the perimeter, 3-4 layers in center) could you even mount a full bracket? 

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I'm sure a bracket could be done if the designer okd it.  But would move center of buoyancy, and I think ruin the looks.  Glassed the starboard bottom today.  Full length in one go, 6 1/2 hrs.  Everything went well except for outgassing at some of the staple holes.  Gave me fits.  I cut slits in the  peel ply and glass  at these spots to let it lay down.  I think most of them worked but some may need patched.  I was flippin out.

 

I had put a thin seal coat of epoxy on to avoid the outgassing thing.  Apparently some of the staple holes remained unsealed.  All well, done for the day. 

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