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Miyot

Ocracoke 24

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Bottom of boat is glassed.  Well there are over 5000 staples in the boat, and about a dozen of them on the starboard side bottom didn't seal properly when I applied the seal coat of epoxy.  I began glassing at noon not worrying about out gassing because of the seal coat.  Anyhow I had a dozen small bubbles on the bottom starboard side.  I slit them and nursed them as I worked.   They all turned out good, with the glass filled and and epoxied to the hull.  However the peel ply would not lay back down on these spots, leaving the weave of the glass visible.  These were easily patched with a little epoxy and a new piece of peel ply on top after the peel ply was removed.

 

I started glassing the port side at 7:00 PM and had no out gassing problems.  Also went much quicker.  

 

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Hey Hightech.  I'm going to paint her Fighting Lady Yellow.  I got Micron CSC bottom paint in black.  I'll have no boot stripe.  The peel ply is excellent, but a pain to use.  Its surface tension properties are excellent.  It helps fill the weave nicely.  I believe two thin coats on top will be enough to allow sanding without hitting the glass.  I was planning to mix in a little 407 (micro balloons) to ease sanding and help fill any small defects.  I'm unsure on how much to use.    Any ideas?  I think I read somewhere to use 5-7% by volume.

 

I found a dealer and will order a Yamaha 150 soon.  Here is a pic of my T Top under construction.

 

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Miyot;

Peel ply is a little hard to get used to but the end result is worth it. When you tab in the interior bulkheads use it there too. Really comes out nice. 

I use micro balloons also. It sounds to me you are trying to do a flow coat with thickened epoxy. What I do is  to make the epoxy thick enough so it won't run.I am not sure about the volume but its pretty thick. Like mayonnaise or peanut butter. I do any obvious small defects and sand them smooth. Then cover the entire boat using a broad drywall tool and sand it using a chatter board. It doesn't have to be real thick but enough to fill the grain and any lows you have.

We also us a tool that we learned from Walter Greene a legend from Yarmouth ME. We have a piece of 3/4" plywood the size of a sheet of sandpaper. I mount it to a 500 rpm grinder. It is critical for balance to get the board mounted as close to center as possible. Spray glue a piece of 36 grit to the plywood and you have a fairing machine. Little scary I must admit but very fast and can't dig in because of the shape. We call it the Greene machine. 

I like you T-Top. Real easy to screw that up I am learning. Too many posts to little structure. Do you think you could send me a clear picture of it to my email. 

I like the yellow. No boot will look great.We have a yellow boat here. He used a white boot and tinted Petit Vivid bottom paint to match. Sometimes I like it and sometimes I don't.

Going with the Yamaha I see. Good choice. Better than the other engine we discussed. 

You flying now. Flip over by Labor Day looks like for you. I hope to be glassed by then. Very hectic this week after vacation.

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Here is a photo of my Marissa 'Salty' in Fighting Lady Yellow.  Sorry about the photo.  the colors do not show up very well in my garage.  I am getting close to finishing her.

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Not much to show lately.  The boat is glassed which went really well, and is now nearly ready for paint.  I have a question to anyone who can answer.  I'm about ready to build the console and have been wondering on how thick it should be.  I have 1/2 inch ply which I have considered and I also have enough 1/4" I could glue up and make it 3/4 inch thick.  Or I could go with 3/8 and 1/4 and make it 5/8 thick.   The console is 3' by 4' by some 50 odd inches tall.  Half inch would be lighter and the 3/4 beefier.  What should it be?

 

Turn over coming soon.  My T Top and leaning post have arrived from Birdsall Marine and I am pleased and can't wait to see them on the boat.  Outboard is also ordered.  I'm moving on, but a long way to go.  I'll get some pics up soon.

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Miyot my vote would be for 1/2" I assume you will cover it with a layer of glass inside and out to seal it. More than strong enough. Can't wait to see more pics. I kinda missed your posts. I thought your wife had you chained in the basement.

PG

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I think 1/2" will be plenty strong and see no need for glass at all.  3 coats of epoxy is plenty to seal it.  Glass adds nothing to make it more water proof.  It might make it more damage proof, but unless there is some activity I am not aware of, I don't see the need.  I would cleat the corners and/or tape them, using epoxy in both cases.  I am also a big fan of light weight.

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I would glass the console. Maybe a lighter weight glass would be sufficient. I have had epoxied plywood start to check after a while. I wouldn't chance it with all the beautiful work you've done!

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I would glass the console. Maybe a lighter weight glass would be sufficient. I have had epoxied plywood start to check after a while. I wouldn't chance it with all the beautiful work you've done!

Thanks Randolph.  I have 8 0z glass for the console I had bought months ago.  I am going to glass it.  I was wondering about the thickness of the ply for the console because it actually provides a lot of support for the Top.  Perhaps 1/2" will be thick enough with a good frame work inside.  All my edges on the console will get a half inch round over so a descent frame will be necessary anyhow.

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I mount it to a 500 rpm grinder. It is critical for balance to get the board mounted as close to center as possible. Spray glue a piece of 36 grit to the plywood

Hitechmarine could it be that there's a zero missing from the RPM of your grinder?  I've searched DeWalt, Milwaukee, Bosch,and Craftsman and none seems to offer a grinder that runs at less than 5000 RPM.  It does seems that I've seen such grinders used for grinding through paint and rust on ships in years gone by but cannot find one these days..  Maybe I'll visit a pawn shop.....

 

Also, no one, even Woodcraft in this town sells 36 grit sandpaper.  Woodcraft does sell a 36 grit sanding sponge, but not sandpaper.

 

Incidentally, since starting my boat building project, I've discovered the virtues of spray adhesive used to bond sandpaper, especially 40 grit to whatever size and shape of a stick you can imagine and create to get into any nook or cranny that shows up in your work.  I've done such with a stick about the size and shape of a yardstick and used it sort of like a crosscut or buck saw.  One can really gouge out the material!!

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Fishman38 Mine is a Milwaukee variable speed buffer polisher. The paper I use comes from a hardwood floor drum sander. I cut it to size and spray glue it on. In the B&B Forum there is article stated by Scott Dunsworth. It is called 9x11 sander. It shows pictures of the one he made. His base is fiberglass. I use plywood because it is easier and quite frankly didn't think of making it out of fiberglass. You definitely want a slow turning sander. This does a ton of work very quickly but it is not for the faint of heart.

We use spray glue to temporarily hold fiberglass cloth in place while we add the resin.  Making sanding sticks are great for complex shapes. 

Best

PG

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Thanks PG.  I remember seeing such an article as you mention but couldn't remember where and couldn't find it.  Didn't think to search in Scott's thread.

I thought maybe you were using a polisher/buffer rather than a grinder but couldn't find anything there either that looked like it might serve.  I will look again.

 

 

We use spray glue to temporarily hold

fiberglass cloth in place while we add the resin.

Sounds like a neat trick.  I assume it would be used only around the edges to avoid interfering with adhesion of the resin?  Or is that not an issue?

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Finally some paint going on.  Starting with Interprotect 2000E, then Micron CSC on the bottom.  I'm using Epoxy Primekote 404 on the topsides followed with Perfection Fighting Lady Yellow.  The Interprotect goes on easily with no problems with runs or sags and fills little imperfections nicely.  An organic filter and plenty of ventilation is a must.  When I get to the Perfection paint I will remove the end wall to the barn for ventilation and to prepare for turnover.  The Perfection paint is nothing to mess with.  Full body protection and an organic filter with really good cross ventilation is imperative for rolling on the paint.  I'm going to roll it on and tip with a brush.  I removed the air conditioner at one end of the barn and had good cross ventilation for laying on the Interprotect.  Even with a good breeze the organic filter was a must.

 

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Full body protection and an organic filter with really good cross ventilation is imperative for rolling on the paint.  I'm going to roll it on and tip with a brush.  I removed the air conditioner at one end of the barn and had good cross ventilation for laying on the Interprotect.  Even with a good breeze the organic filter was a must.
 

Even the best organic vapors cartridge in a respirator does nothing to remove the isocyanates from the air you breath if it contains vapors from a solvent based 2 part LPU.  And since they (isocyanates) are odorless the fact that you smell nothing only means it has removed the solvents with an odor.  Supplied air (along with a suit) is the only true protection from these paints.

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