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Waste no time!!


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Well, rough sanded, centerboard hole cutout, centerboard trunk made and being glued up. I know no paint and eyewash. Yes the transom has another top piece that goes on it. But not ready for that one yet.

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Well, if anyone is following this mess, here is an update. In the quick update thread, I posted my reasons for the short side during initial construction. Now you see the rest of the story. :wink: Of course I still need to do the framing in it. But nothing is in the way as we begin our long and lengthy process of finish work, too. As per several comments on weight, we did do a rough estimate of around 350 lbs, at most as you see it. Two of us can pick it up and reposition it on the strongback with ease, with the weight stretched across the length of the hull.

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'eyrster, ye do have the ***eye***, that's for sure!

SAHWEET shape and looks to be perfect for the shallows and flats down there.

Now a question or two,if you please?

Do you find that the Cypress takes up much water after some time afloat?

Or are you not worried because the boat will live on a trailer?

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Dave, dry, flat swan and narrow planks, will all but eliminate the multitude of problems of water intrusion so many speak about today. This is not say that you will not run into the wetting problem. But also keep in mind our primers, caulks, and sealers are so different nowadays, coupled with small boats staying out of the water more, that your worries are lessoned with using cypress. Also seek out a nice golden tan color. Use a playing card width on the seams of a very flexible caulking, nailed snug, but not tight, for trailable boats. Strip planking with cypress, is no diffference than any other woods, if dry, too.

Do I think that I may have more problems than using white cedar? Time will tell, but I doubt it. Pine, now lets not even go there. Can't wait till tommorrow, so I can go back to work on it. But for the night, my wife gets my undivided attention for hot wings, Buffalo style, with extra sauce. I did get the framing in the stern done tonight. Can you tell I am excited???

If you will take a quick look at the boat half turned, you can see that the keel is almost parrallel to the chine line, causing the same deadrise fore to aft till the tuck aft of the centerboard. This is one of the reasons for logging or "stepping" in the bow pieces, to get the sharpe entry in a shallow draft. The shot shows the keel shoe, or in the Sea Bright Skiffs, its called "Boxed Keel" and serves as the same purpose for stability on beaching it.

Craig, about the freeboard, plus or minus 18 to 20 inches, depending on the mood. and wood. I may go a few inches higher, but keep in mind it does get a washboard, for added strength and railing.

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MIke,

She is looking sweet! I got your direct e-mail and had to take a look right away. We have been up in South Dakota all weekend and just got back. This is the only post I will get to look at and make tonight.

Thanks for the update. I really want to get over that way to see the boat on the water next summer.

Keep the updates coming.

Steve

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The transom is done, and the interior bottom is painted. I have been gone for a bit, this week, so work has slowed a bit. This month starts fall fishing, too. So progress may have slow a bit more. But I am hoping for a month end float test. Some of your guys are hard to keep up with,, with all of your weekend trips of sailing and get togethers.

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update, Well, I got all the framing inside done except for beside the centerboard trunk, which will go in tommorrow. I will prime the inside hopefully tommorrow and finish planking the sides , one solid and one short plank, the next day, which is the stock under the hull bottom. The outer stem comes next. I did these shots from a distance in hopes that it would show the lines better. I also cleaned up the shop for more working area, as the weather is getting a little cooler now.

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That is just so interesting Mike.

I have always wanted to design a boat from scratch and build it. But I would have lofted it and built the form and faired the lines. This way you kind of lay it out to scale with major scantlings in mind....fair it up and go for it. So cool. It is fun to see it come to life in such a detailed manner. I enjoy this thread for sure.

I actually like most of the lines of the Weekender(or VAC).....but would love to re-draw the boat with a V-bottom, have the beam carried much further aft (much wider transome) and built without the outer permanent strongback and rather with slightly more traditional methods. I would nix the clipper bow/bowsprit support and go to an almost British plumb stem/ entry.

I have actually photshopped VAC to look like this before. I liked how it looked.

A person could combine elements of your boat, the VAC or WE, and your building style and come up with something really interesting.

Do you have images of other boats you know to have been built this way?

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Heck I gots discs full of full size lofting in place boats, Thats how we all did it, till the "S" framed boats came into play. Then most all of those needed to be lofted with a master curved pieces and battens , 3D on white floors or painted out plywoods, full scale, to build the frames for the boat. The lines were taken from scale pattens drawn on a table top. The best I can remember about the weekender, it makes use of conventional sized and readily avaliable materials for the ease of construction.

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