Jump to content

Core Sound 17 rope layout for each sail and how it all is suppose to hookup.


musicmanx2

Recommended Posts

Are there any good videos of how to hook all the sails and hardware up. My pulley layout is pretty basic I think by the

way the man built the boat. How the spit poles hook on the mast etc. I wish I had a person in the area of Saint James City Florida to help me with the layout of all the ropes etc. Its all new to me.

 

 

 

 

DSCF8477.JPG

IMG_4225.jpeg

IMG_4226.jpeg

IMG_4227.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites


First of all, there is more than one way to rig a CS17 for sailing.  There are two good, detailed videos regarding this on YouTube.  Alan Stewart, co-owner of B&B made them.  They are about rigging the mark 3 version of the 17, but most of it can be used on your boat.  
This is Graham Byrnes’ boat:  

 

This is Chief’s boat.  (He’s the head of the Water Tribe that hosts the Everglades Challenge and other events):  

 

I will be in Florida this February.  If you want me to stop by, I might be able to arrange it.  It’s a shame we didn’t get together last year.  I rented an Air B&B in Bokelia last year.  Can’t afford to do that this year, though.

 

I will be refurbishing a Core Sound 17 day sailer this spring.  If you want to keep an eye on my post, there will be plenty on there about how I do it.  I believe it will be a few months too late for your needs, though.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Looking some ideas to use ripstop material for a cover for my Core Sound 17 in these pictures. It won't take much room when folded up and its light weight. Some how  ro around the two mast and use bungee cord to seal it around the mast and then some large plastic clamps to clip it around the gunnel edge where I have a nice lip.

Going around each mast Im thinking how that can be done. If I use two pieces it would be easier to go around the mast and then maybe clip the two edges together.

 

Any Ideas out there???????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My setup is basic with no lines running to the aft of the  cockpit. I wish I had someone in the area Pine Island

Saint james city Florida to step me thru the lines and how they need to be run.

Maybe someone will be in the area soon. Im working right now replacing my bunk boards and carpet on them

on my lift along with new Cradle brackets. Paint new cold galvanized on the I beams and replaced the motors with

new ones. It will be ready for the boat soon.

I know there are different ways to rig them and this one seems to be real basic so should not be to hard for

someone to show me. The man I bought it from here on Pine Island moved to state of Washington had to move fast and never took the time to show me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the WCTSS.  They are a helpful bunch of sailors.  A couple of them own Core Sound boats.  They are all over in your area, from Tampa to Avon Park to Ft. Myers.  Www.wctss.net. Or check out their Facebook page:  

IMG_1764.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David Heckman is one example of a WCTSS member who could help you.  He owns a Core Sound 17, and cruises with that group.  I believe he lives in Sarasota or the Tampa Bay area.  Dale Young is another.  He just sold his Core Sound 17.  He’s wintering in Avon Park, but just attended the cruising event on Cayo Costa very near you.  There are others in that group who are owners of cat ketches, but these two comes to mind.  

IMG_1778.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are there any drawings of the layout of the ropes going to the  poles and hooks on the masts. 

Would be nice to see a basic drawing of how the ropes are run up and out to the poles from the mast and pulley

on the poles.

 

These are the ropes I have that came with the boat

IMG_4632.jpeg

IMG_4633.jpeg

IMG_4634.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found this in an old set of plans I have for a Core Sound 15.  Your 17 will be pretty much the same.  Do keep in mind that every boat owner rigs their boats differently.  But the basics are shown here on these photos.  If you want, you could request a pdf from B&B of the rigging plan for the 17.  The cost wouldn’t be too much.

IMG_1796.jpeg

IMG_1795.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The two white sticks in your latest photos are called sprits.  The shorter one is for the rear sail, which we call the mizzen.  The longer sprit is for the front sail, which is called a mainsail.

 

The sails are trimmed (or pulled in and out) by the blue lines we call sheets.  
 

On your boat, the main sheet (highlighted in yellow) passes through the block (pulley) on the seat circled in yellow, goes up to the block (pulley) on the sprit for the mainsail, and down to the block on the other side of the seat.  The ends are then passed through those cam cleats that are directly behind the blocks.  Be sure to tie a figure eight stopper knot in the bitter ends of the line!

 

The mizzen sheeting system is a little trickier.  This is different than the drawing.  Fortunately, I tried this way on my yellow boat,  before going a more conventional route.  I’ve highlighted those lines in yellow, and included a photo of the line (not rope) routing on my boat.  I hope this helps.

 

All of this is frustrating to me, as I offered to visit you last February 2023.  In fact, I spent 10 days in Bokelia, and was semi-bored.  Had I known you were so close, I could have looked you up.  But you never responded to my offer, so I had no way of knowing.  Water over the dam.

 

I hope this helps.

 

 

IMG_1797.jpeg

IMG_1798.jpeg

IMG_5827.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

The two white sticks in your latest photos are called sprits.  The shorter one is for the rear sail, which we call the mizzen.  The longer sprit is for the front sail, which is called a mainsail.

 

The sails are trimmed (or pulled in and out) by the blue lines we call sheets.  
 

On your boat, the main sheet (highlighted in yellow) passes through the block (pulley) on the seat circled in yellow, goes up to the block (pulley) on the sprit for the mainsail, and down to the block on the other side of the seat.  The ends are then passed through those cam cleats that are directly behind the blocks.  Be sure to tie a figure eight stopper knot in the bitter ends of the line!

 

The mizzen sheeting system is a little trickier.  This is different than the drawing.  Fortunately, I tried this way on my yellow boat,  before going a more conventional route.  I’ve highlighted those lines in yellow, and included a photo of the line (not rope) routing on my boat.  I hope this helps.

 

All of this is frustrating to me, as I offered to visit you last February 2023.  In fact, I spent 10 days in Bokelia, and was semi-bored.  Had I known you were so close, I could have looked you up.  But you never responded to my offer, so I had no way of knowing.  Water over the dam.

 

I hope this helps.

 

 

IMG_1797.jpeg

IMG_1798.jpeg

IMG_5827.jpeg

Thankyou so much for your help with this. Yes to bad we didn't get to meet while you were here in the area Bokellia

 

13 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

The two white sticks in your latest photos are called sprits.  The shorter one is for the rear sail, which we call the mizzen.  The longer sprit is for the front sail, which is called a mainsail.

 

The sails are trimmed (or pulled in and out) by the blue lines we call sheets.  
 

On your boat, the main sheet (highlighted in yellow) passes through the block (pulley) on the seat circled in yellow, goes up to the block (pulley) on the sprit for the mainsail, and down to the block on the other side of the seat.  The ends are then passed through those cam cleats that are directly behind the blocks.  Be sure to tie a figure eight stopper knot in the bitter ends of the line!

 

The mizzen sheeting system is a little trickier.  This is different than the drawing.  Fortunately, I tried this way on my yellow boat,  before going a more conventional route.  I’ve highlighted those lines in yellow, and included a photo of the line (not rope) routing on my boat.  I hope this helps.

 

All of this is frustrating to me, as I offered to visit you last February 2023.  In fact, I spent 10 days in Bokelia, and was semi-bored.  Had I known you were so close, I could have looked you up.  But you never responded to my offer, so I had no way of knowing.  Water over the dam.

 

I hope this helps.

 

 

IMG_1797.jpeg

IMG_1798.jpeg

IMG_5827.jpeg

Thankyou so much for your help with this. Starting to understand the layout.

To bad we didn't meet while you were here in Bokeelia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You’re right.  The hook attaches to the mast, and the line goes down the mast.  On my 15, there’s a cleat at the base of the mast.  Most boats these days run the line all the way back to the skipper, along the side deck.  
 

I’ve been saving the best fact for last.  We call this line the snotter.  I’m not joking.  This is the traditional name for it.  On my boat, I use green line, for obvious reasons.

 

Also, I noticed some short lines with hooks on the end.  These are probably the downhauls.  This is another line that is run back to the skipper on modern boats.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


Supporting Members

Supporting Members can create Clubs, photo Galleries, don't see ads and make messing-about.com possible! Become a Supporting Member - only $12 for the next year. Pay by PayPal or credit card.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.