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Action Tiger

Action Tiger builds sailboat. With epoxy!

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You've hit on a key element that isn't often discussed Robert. The need to do a good job of getting it fair, BEFORE the 'glass goes on. It's a lot easier to get a good job, if the raw and rough surfaces are fair, before you feel guilty about sanding through fibers, trying to knock down a high spot. I often use spray can primer (fast dry enamel) so I can eyeball chines, seams and edges. Just as the primer goes on it's shiny, so you can see reflections around the chine or whatever, helping you know where to work next. A light dusting is all it takes, it sands easily and can be wiped off with thinner if necessary. Fairing before the 'glass goes down, lets the 'glass job go much neater. The fabric lays down better and your fairing and smoothing effort afterward is simpler too.

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Great. Now I can't get in the garage to work today. My head is too big to fit through the door! ;)

It only took me about 8 or 10 boats, Paul, before I realized it was much easier to smooth wood than glass. The funny part is prep, prep, prep was drummed into my head when I learned the painting trade. You can't put smooth paint on a rough surface, either, but the leap of logic escaped me for years.

Part of the reason I prefer skin on frame is the lack of surface prep and sanding needed. :) I used 1/4 of a painter folded sheet on my freeb, and none on my firefly, so far...

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Whoo! Last little blobs of filler are in the little dips and p holes what were left, and it's almost time to glass!

I'll scrape this goop off green, and glass it later if the gloop is hard, or tomorrow evening.

17-1800 is the peak heat, so evening glassing...

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Good gracious, how many pictures can I take of me sanding and filling. Still at it. I think I'm happy enough to go ahead and glass. Once we get an overnight low in the 60s again, I'm going to go for it. :)

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Yikes! That means I'm about 1% sanding and 2% building.Haha. Honestly, I don't swear all that much, but I do talk to myself. I will tell myself exactly what I think of me in no uncertain terms.

When you work alone, the worst part of the job is always the boss and the help. I'm surrounded by idiot. :)

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It's not so much the talking to yourself that's bad, it's when you start deliberately giving yourself the wrong answers just to see if you'll get caught.

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If you are alone, and someone overhears, "What did you call me?", you are going to get looked at or talked to...

My real trouble comes on days like today, when I have to work around other people. When that happens, I generally mutter to myself in Spanish.

Being a triple threat, though, I curse myself in German, because hardly anybody around here understands any of that, but everyone knows the Spanish swears.

In certain parts of my area I can get away with Portuguese, but in other parts I'm afraid I'll be adopted if I speak it. :) My grandpa was so into assimilation, though, and I learned it so late, my Portuguese just convinces anyone who hears it I DO have the mind of a child. Hahaha!

I'm off to real work, y'all. I put what I hope is the last few dabs of fairing gloop on yesterday, so after it cures and sands, I'm gonna finally glass this bad boy.

I've been busy on other stuff. Not the CS, she's waiting for something I need before I can start, aside from my undivided attention. I'm trying to wrap up all my loose ends, y'all, so this fall I can focus on old #55.

I'll post some pics of the boat related stuffs.

Peace,

Robert

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Yes, I'm still fairing this stupid boat. The cheap ply had lots of little checks to fill, lots of wire holes left to fill. I'm really not trying to be too crazy, but on a bigger sailboat that will be around for a while, I think it best to take a little time. These seams need to look good before I glass them and try to clean it up after the fact.

 

I've been repairing other boats, finishing the kid's punt with them, and working on the other bits for this boat, like foils and spars, too.

 

Just stuck in a big progress eddy, no big deal. :)

 

Peace,

Robert

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Good gravy, y'all, I finally got some darn glass on this boat. I forgot how much I hate sheathing with glass, but my wife and I can still lay it down, Jack.

I had a go alone, and it was no bueno, so I had the brains help. My wife is awesome, y'all. She is a mixing, ooring wonder. There are some awkward slants and vertical spots to gloop, y'all, and she just dripped along right in front of my squeegee. Magic, y'all.

I got a whole bunch stuck down nice and tight, with very little extra resin. Happy. Next layer will slightly overlap the last, which will be coarsely sanded to fair and ready for bond. Then the transom and extra bottom/lower chine layer, and the stem layers, which will be biaxial cut from scraps...

I really hate doing glass on separate days, but it is what it is, with this crazy hot weather.

I also built that punt, already wrecked it, and am now effecting repairs. Also, repairing the kids pirogue in preparation for the big camping trip. And, I'm really, really about to sew in my kayak's coaming. I may achieve the record for slowest continuous duration build ever.

I'll get some pictures up when I go take them. ;)

Peace,

Robert

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Not much else to report besides gloop and dry. I'm doing the cloth in sections, and allowing a good cure since I can't go green, as it were. Slower, maybe not as good, but well suited to short windows below 90f.

I must start a new thread about what's been up. This boat is baby stepping along on the epoxy's schedule. ;)

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Fiberglass, Fiberglass, does what ever Fiberglass does. It's like a web, any size, but don't get caught, because it's itchy as...

Look out, here comes the Fiberglass!

One half of the hull has 6oz cloth. The other half is about to get some, too. Then, both halves will be covered on the bottom with one more layer, so two layers of 6oz on bottom.

Whee!

post-4050-0-10018100-1472913722_thumb.jpeg

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Those whitish spots are filler. Epoxy mixed with talcum powder looks just like starved glass when you use it as a filler. It will drive you mad.

Luckily, this epoxy doesn't foam too badly when you drive it around for about 58 miles before you let it settle...

Peace,

Robert

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Glassed the other half last night. One more piece to cover the entire bottom spanning from upper chine to upper chine.

The upper parts of the boat will just be covered in one layer of 4oz glass to hold checking. This stuff is structure and protection rolled into one, as the design calls for two layers of glass over the chines.

One more layer of glass, then some fill coats, then some primer, then I can sand again! Yea!

Peace,

Robert

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