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even-keeled

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even-keeled last won the day on October 15 2018

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About even-keeled

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    Phoenix area, AZ

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  1. Thanks for creating this tutorial series. I've been looking for info on ending the double-corded stitch at a Kudzu fan-tail. Is the stitch shown here more recommended these days?
  2. My book has Poco Barta inch measurements in fractions. Yes, you are correct, it is shown as 11 12/16. Also, the 34" coaming offsets are found in the Curlew section. Each bracket A dimension should be 4"+ the keel stringer Z dimension. I ended up not using the bow & stern assemblies shown in the photo. They're built as designed, assembled with Titebond III and painted with 2 part grey polyurethane. You can have them for the cost of shipping. I changed direction with my kayak and had custom laser-cut pieces fabricated. There are several other Poco Barta related posts in this forum, some misspelled.
  3. It was cheap and easy. It assembled in a couple of hours, including the strongback and the stringer splices. I won't cover this one because it looks amazing like this. I was going to dope and tissue it like an old model plane. It was about a square foot of 1/8 ply and 3"x36" 1/8 balsa. I'd like to make one of each from the books and also a Nimrod.
  4. I built this one for motivation to build a real Curlew. I'm excited for that build. This is 4:1 scale. My foot fits perfectly in this one. My other kayak, Barta has a mix of hand-made and laser-cut frames. The real Curlew will have all plywood parts lasered. This was lofted from the book using the plywood coaming option. The coaming support is integral to the custom under-the-knee frame. My only question about the design is how well the frame near your feet handles the bending load of 3 deck stringers ending right there. I imagine that it holds up well because I have not heard about any failures.
  5. At 6' 3", this is how I fit into the 17' Poco Barta with my size 14 shoes. I lost a couple inches of room after adding foot pegs.
  6. Ok, I think I see it too. It looks like you'd clamp them with Titebond III to their appropriate bow/stern piece.
  7. I'm not familiar with Shad's design, does the bottom notch at each frame accept a bow/stern or a stringer?
  8. This is quite an artistic version of the Stonefly. What is your technique for curving the gunwales?
  9. I wondered if anyone would notice the 1/8 ply. It's a 1/4 scale prototype for my daughter's full size Curlew. The bow and stern assemblies tab together.
  10. It is 2' long. Here's how I did it. I lofted for the lower stringer cutout using these coords: (0,1)(2 30/32,1 3/32)(3,3/16). The top of this cutout changed slightly in angle to meet the stringer without preload. A tiny step will then need sanding to meet the curve of the bow. My Poco had gaps where lashings are struggling to hold the bow and stern to the lower stringer. This is the remedy. Also, confirm that the distance between the lofted top and bottom stringer cutouts is the same where the bow meets frame 13. This assembly is laser-cut. Round lightening holes would be more practical when following the instructions. Cheers.
  11. Hatchless looks like a good choice. Nice baidarka. Did you use spar varnish on the skin?
  12. Something like this should clear the skin by about 1/4" and allow more room for entry. I would have kept all sides of the frame with the original offsets. As a disclaimer, I can't recommend acting on design ideas without designer approval.
  13. Since this coaming isn't as long as ones where the beam has been implemented, there's less room to add a lower frame. Depending on the child, their hamstrings may rest on an extra frame. I would make the plywood frame in question not droop so much between the coaming and the gunwales. That will give a little room without a major redesign. Maybe make a cardboard mock-up of that one frame to get a better idea of fit. I was going to build a tadpole for my daughter but she's outgrown that design. Now it will need to be a Curlew for her.
  14. Looks like a finely crafted kayak. I'd like to see the long-term differences between lashed and screwed-together fuselages.
  15. The Stonefly looks great. Thanks for sharing the adventure pictures.
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