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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/20/2022 in Posts

  1. Ravenswood—low volume and standard. The LV has been varnished with poly urethane and is ready to be covered. With the frames cut and stringers made, the second on went together quickly—three days from frames in the jig to FROG. It’s startling how fast they come together when everything is prepped. Laminating and then sanding and finishing the coaming is the slowest part. Takeaway from the coaming is to use very thin, straight-grained stock. I used African mahogany (wood store had a nice piece of 8/4) but next time I’d use maple or oak as Jeff recommends. Also cut it very thin. The book said 3/16ths, I went with 1/8, but next time I go for 3/32s. 1/8 was as thin as I could get on my table saw but if you have access to a band saw set up for re-sawing go thinner. The mahogany looks great but the grain was a little squirrelly. I don’t think it was worth the extra effort. Looking forward to getting them launched now! Hal
    3 points
  2. We finally finished lashing my wife’s Ravenswood LV. It’s astonishingly light at 18 lbs minus coaming. Next up, assembling my Ravenswood Standard. Frames and stringers are done so we’re hoping it will go together more quickly.
    3 points
  3. Working on Ravenswood Standard frame now after finishing my wife’s LV. Once you have the frames prepped and stringers scarfed, it goes pretty quick. The most frustrating part was finding decent, knot-free cedar. Typically my stringers ended up with 2-3 scarfs and I often had to cut them apart and reglue because of hard spots, or small kinks. If the stringers are kinked, you won’t get a fair curve when you assemble the frog. Heres an example along with my solution (middle of three). The trick is to clamp the scarfs against a long piece of steel or aluminum angle. Once I started doing this, ALL my glueups have been straight. Give it a try if you’re struggling to get straight stringers with multiple scarfs. HH
    2 points
  4. Padre, it was definitely unnerving flying the drone. If doing it again i'd launch from the stern deck because the drone immediately attempts to stop moving over the ground once airborne so you have to fly away quickly to avoid sailing into it. The cockpit coaming cutouts are standard on the 17mk3 and i'm sure you cut add them to your boat. There is no divider but I did add a divider on my 20mk3. Here is a picture I did that so i could put stuff in there without it sliding back and not being able to reach it. I knew any oars I use would be 2 piece and so would fit in the stern part. The coaming space was never factored into the floatation of the boat they're purely aesthetic and functional for cockpit comfort but of course if you seal them they will add some floatation and righting moment if they go under. We just did some more capsize testing of the Chiefs CS-17 Mark3 with a mast head float and i'll post the results soon. Hey Joe! thanks. Its the first time I've ever tried flying the drone off a moving boat. I did 2 flights and the first one the boat was wing on wing. Unfortunately the drone wasn't recording!!! but i did get some still images so thats how i got that shot. The second flight we gybed the main to make it easier to fly away from the boat after takeoff.
    2 points
  5. I appreciate everyone that posted pictures of their projects and finished frames. They helped me immensely. Here are some of mine. The spring clamps came in handy when positioning the stringers on the frames because of the one-handed operation. I also found adjustable bungy cords very effective.
    1 point
  6. Lookin' good! Please post pics when you get on the water.
    1 point
  7. I'm applying the two-part urethane today. It's a long story, but I previously paid for the Cape Falcon Kayak course and decided to use the skinning and coating method recommended by the proprietor of that company. My skin is thus 840 X-TRA Tuff Ballistic Nylon, covered by the two-part urethane that I colored with rare earth pigment. I also did the lacing system where you tighten up the skin before actually stitching, and then after stitching everything, hose down the entire boat. When it dries the skin is super tight. Looks wrinkled in these photos, which are before I soaked it. Not sure if I like the pigment infused urethane approach. Doesn't look the greatest, but I'm sure once it's in the water I won't care.
    1 point
  8. Thanks for the reminder. My Spindrift 10 mast is 5.2 meters slightly over 17 feet. I only had a bathroom scale to weigh it on. The mast weight is about 7 lbs or 3 something kg. My mast is 3 sections. The bottom two are aluminum the upper section is hollow wood.
    1 point
  9. Thanks very much Don
    1 point
  10. Thanks but all are not back safe yet!!! Still some sailors on the course! Kevin (KDubs) and his daughter (Maggers) are closing in on the finish right now in their Core Sound 17 #398! They are doing great. https://watertribe.com/Events/ChallengeGMapper.aspx Here's a video i took from our first day sailing.
    1 point
  11. Bah, Chick just wanted more boats to build.
    1 point

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