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bagarre

Rounding off stringers

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I have all my stringers scarfed and ready to be resawed to final dimensions and sanded.

 

Is there any value to putting a 1/4" round on each corner? I was thinking of running them thru the mounted router and profile them a little.

 

No edges for the fabric to fray against.

Saves a little but if weight (might add up)

Looks a little more finished IMO.

 

Is there any reason to not do this?

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Just watch your fingers... :)

Already have that bloody t-shirt from the table saw. Luckily, I just shut it off and it was barely turning but it still got me three stitches in my thumb.

I have a comprehensive collection of blocks, push sticks and feather boards now. 

 

It'll give me something else to do until the kits arrive in the mail. Routing the stringers that is, not cutting my fingers off.

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Oh, I LIKE you. Cutting my fingers off... I laughed so hard it scared the dog. :)

I did 20+ years with machines and feel lucky to have escaped. I use them as infrequently as possible, now.

You could make yourself a little coving plane while you wait, round over the stringers old school style.

Yes, I'm THAT guy. :)

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Familiar with he concept of instant karma? Can you discern the little gape I finally got to stay closed there in my finger pad?

Watch out for a highly loaded Phillips head screwdriver, too. :)

Oh. Gathered the bits for the plane. Glued up a blank I can start working this evening. Hope to have it done... They really are easy.

Peace,

Robert

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I ran a test piece thru the router, I forgot how much material gets blown off with a 1/4 round.

And then I thought about pushing over 500 feet of wood thru and grabbed some 80 grit paper instead :)

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Cedar I find it better to "climb cut" with the router to avoid any splintering which cedar has a tendency to do...

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/climb-cutting-don’t-believe-the-naysayers.aspx

I definitely found this to be true yesterday as well.

A 1/8th round would be more appropriate for the stringers but, that's accomplished with 80grit just as quickly IMO.

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I have all my stringers scarfed and ready to be resawed to final dimensions and sanded.

 

Is there any value to putting a 1/4" round on each corner? I was thinking of running them thru the mounted router and profile them a little.

 

No edges for the fabric to fray against.

Saves a little but if weight (might add up)

Looks a little more finished IMO.

 

Is there any reason to not do this?

I initially routed all of the edges that would be in direct contact with the cloth...and after lashing, went back and sanded most of the inner edges as well. It's [very] likely "overkill"; however, I think the end result is more "finished" looking.

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Well, the finger is slowing me a bit, but I have 9 others... Body and blade are rough shaped. The wedge I cut out will be used as a rough guide for cutting the blade wedge, but I cut them in two pieces so I could adjust the throat, in case I made an imperfect cut. Well, so I could clean up my imperfect cuts. :)

I'll use the flatter stock to make sides to finish the blade throat. No fuss... :)

I'm going bevel up, to give the blade the most support, with the least fuss, and to maybe help cut cleaner. The angle is pretty low.

After the body is all glued together straight, I can finish truing the sole and blade and futz around adjusting it.

I hope I can beat the UPS man. ;)

I will condense more photos and steps on a thread, if anyone feels the need for more of the same. Instructions are, after all, all over the net. My hope is to inspire you to try...

Peace,

Robert

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It may not be apparent, but I aim to ease the cove out to the shoulder once the sides are on. I didn't want to risk tThe fragile feather edges...

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Are you trying to beat my UPS guy? Cuz, he dropped off the planer this morning.

This little tool goes into the "where have you been all my life" category.

 

It took about 15 minutes per stringer including a quick go with 80 grit to clean it up a little.

The cedar does tear out a little more than other woods but nothing terrible. After a few passes, you get feel for the grain and know which way and how hard to push.

 

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Jokingly, yes. Sorry for the intrusion, I'm dumb like that.

Glad you found a cool plane.

I certainly enjoy tools and making things.

Peace,

Robet

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