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my36

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  1. I'm also a first time builder - just finishing up a Spindrift 10N. The 'problem' with being a first time builder is that amount of time required to research each step. Things like, what kind or wood and epoxy to user, where to order it, how to fillet, how to do a gunwale...takes a tremendous about of time to look into. I spent almost as much time doing the research as doing the building. My next boat will be much faster and much better quality. As already mentioned, you should only build if you will enjoy the build/research process, not just because you want the final product. Lawrence
  2. The aft end is the full 1.5 inches, but the thinnest section is more like 1/2 inch thick. The forward part goes back to almost the full 1.5 inches but I planned it down some to give it a nice contour. I'm hoping that since I don't plan to sail much (if at all) the keel depth won't be a problem. I'm guessing it's not that important when rowing?? Thanks for all the feedback from everyone. Lawrence
  3. Hi, First time builder (of anything) with more questions about my Spindrift 10N... The plans say to use a length of 1x2 to make the keel. I used the hull shape tracing technique I saw in the CD photos to mark and cut my keel. The only thing that worries me is that it seems quite thin at the deepest part of the hull. Is that a problem? Is the keel simply glued and screwed, or should it be taped too? I have a bubbles under my tape in a couple of places - at the transom (as shown in the pic) and at the upper part of the nesting bulkheads where the tape is 6 layers thick. How big a problem is this? Any suggested remedies? I'm having a lot of fun building her and I really expect I'll know what I'm doing by the time I'm finished. Thanks, Lawrence
  4. Peter, Thanks so much for the very helpful info and pics. I have decided to laminate. I had the Philippine Mahogany 1x2 (.75x1.5) planed down and also got two lengths of maple. These may not be the ideal woods, but I'm hoping the epoxy will overcome any deficiencies they have. These two strips combine for a width of 11/16. I'm wondering if I should I add another strip of Philippine Mahogany to bring it closer to 1 inch. Any thoughts? Lawrence
  5. I'm a first time builder about to start the gunwales on my 10N. I purchased a 12 foot board of Philippine Mahogany and had it ripped to make 12' strips of 1 1/2x3/4 and thought I was all set. In researching the easiest way to attach them in the forums, I read in a few places that these need to be 3 ply, laminated but I don't find this in the plans. So, do they need to be laminated? If so, should I rip the wood I have or get some another type of wood for the other plies? Any additional advise on how to attach the gunwales would be appreciated. Thanks, Lawrence
  6. Thanks everyone for the comments and ideas. I'm using 6mm Joubert Okoume plywood. I suspect the problem is that my basement is VERY dry in the winter. I will try Graham's idea of adding humidity with hot rags. I may even mist the panels with a misting water bottle. I did not see anything in the plans about screwing a block, I only read about it here. I'll look again. I plan to unwire enough so that I can add a second layer of tape and epoxy. Is there any reason to worry about the extra layer of tape and epoxy being more than the plans call for?
  7. I'm a first time, novice builder. Things were proceeding nicely until I tried to open the butterfly and start wiring the chine. First time I tried, the butt join at the stem cracked. I sanded it down some and added another layer of tape and let it cure 48 hours again. It started cracking again when I started wiring the sides to the bottom. Is there a trick to this? Any thoughts on how to proceed?
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