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Action Tiger builds sailboat. With epoxy!


Action Tiger
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It's the sign of experience that you've chosen to not varnish anything but the spars and tiller. I can't tell you how many conversations I've had with clients I'm building for, that it's not all it's cracked up to be. On one recent build, the decks, the combing, the seat tops, transom, the spars and assorted doodads were to be varnished, in spite of my repeatedly suggesting this wasn't what he wanted.  A year and a half after completion, he was back and asking how to fix this "unforeseen" issue. The combing cap (just like the way you did it) was left bright, but the deck and combing got paint, the boom was also left bright as was the transom, but everything else was painted, some with contrasting colors.

 

Bright finishes are a long term commitment to the project, though it does look nice initially, watching it break down especially in sub tropical condisions, is simply just a heartbreaker. Personally, I like a "tasteful" use of varnish and often select pieces that don't see much wear. If I varnish a tiller, I like to also supplement it with a wrapping of 1/8" line or leather around the area you hand falls, to save what's there. I also don't like to do combing caps, unless the boat isn't one you need to hike out on much (taller). Now rub rails are about 50/50, especially if there's a metal strip, but most things can live with paint, particularly if colors are well selected.

 

In the end, be careful what you wish for, as you might just get it.

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When I made strip glass canoes, I always painted the outside, and people always got upset.

Suckers.

You keep that thing shiny and bright. :)

 

Besides, it’s cool when someone sees your canoe from far away and doesn’t give it a second glance, but then, later, when the see it closer, their eyes goggle because they realize it’s wooden! Hehe.

 

This boat will live on a trailer on at the marina, waiting. It ain’t gonna be any more beautiful with varnished doodads everywhere.

The spars themselves will be enough bright. Well, with buff tips. ;)

 

Peace,

Robert

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thull,

 

I suppose it would be a rabbet type joint? :) The idea is to have a joint less prone to opening and leaking than a mitre, but have a bit more watertighness and less exposed end grain than a straight butt joint.

 

I will do the frame around the hatch top the same way, but the frame will be built around the coaming with finish nails as spacers, to ensure the hatch fits over, and none too snugly.

 

Peace,

Robert 

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6 hours ago, Action Tiger said:

I suppose it would be a rabbet type joint? :) The idea is to have a joint less prone to opening and leaking than a mitre, but have a bit more watertighness and less exposed end grain than a straight butt joint.

 

The only time I use a miter joint is for molding where it is required to carry the detail around the corner.  There is just about always a better way.

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 The screws are only temporary clamps. Now I will glue some 1/4” solid fir pieces around the edges, with the joints reverse from the frame joints.

Then I’ll round over the upper edges, apply a piece of light cloth to help stave off checking, and call it a hatch cover.

 

Peace,

Robert

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Now, here is funny.

 

Youngest Son and I are building a flattie skiff to play in, and we were adding thwarts.

 

He asked why they were called thwarts, and before I could answer, Daughter yells, form the other room, “Because hey ruin the inside of the boat!”

 

Haha.

Rumor is we are due for some highs of 70s coming up. When we do, I will b able to lay the last few bits of glass I need on this boat.

 

The saga is almost over! 

 

Peace,

Robert

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Temporary, bolt on slot top cover, for when it may be wet a lot, or,the breeze may blow the boat over. :) The oversized looking hatch slide rails are pretty light, really, but stout because EVERYONE is going to lean their elbows there, and/or press on the rails during ingress/egress. I will put some scuppers just forward of the hatch stop block once it’s in.

 

Just forward of the slide rail is where the mast will emerge. It will have a small square lip built up around it to take the mast boot.

 

Yes, I realize there are lots of water traps. The corners of the rails on top, and along the side rails at intervals will be drilled and filled scupper holes. Lots of decent sized drains.

 

Inside the hatch will be a small transvers rail to stiffen the top athwart ship, and provide a spot to hang my little led lights at night for reading or whatnot. :)

 

There are very few things left to do...

 

Peace

Robert

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Today I went crazy and cut every piece of wood off the hatch cover, except the outer, lower strips. And those I beveled heavily.

I made a snazzy little lip to go around the mast hole, for the boot, and tomorrow I’ll attach it, along with the new, much simplified hatches.

 

The new hatches are to be from the same clear plastic as the drop boards and deadlights, now, see? And the sliding hatch will have a “garage” now, in the simpler design. Simpler and lighter are the watchwords.

 

The whole shebang will be less than half the weight it was  even though the other cover wasn’t all that bad. I just wanted it simpler, as I won’t evwn use it during most outings, substituting a cloth cover for the slot top.

 

The partners are all bolted in, and the foils are ready to be attached. This stupid thing is fitting to be a boat, y’all!

 

Yeah, I know, pictures. I’ll take them, I’ll take them. 

Peace,

Robert

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These things are easy to do when you just make it up as you go.

 

There really was nothing wrong with the other layout, either, it was just heavier than I wanted to lean over the boat with. It actually looked and worked quite nicely, and I’m second guessing myself.

 

Still, every part I’ve redone has been markedly better than what it replaced, so a,do-over isn’t all bad. Plus, I’ll be right back to where I was in one half day’s work.

 

Peace,

Robert

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