Jump to content

Oar length


Hirilonde
 Share

Recommended Posts


Went for a row yesterday.  I learned a few things.

 

1.  Thole pins will not work for me.  Ordered some 2/3/8" "A" oar locks   http://www.paddlesandoars.com/ACCESSORIES/OAR-LOCKS/  The diameter of the leathers is a full 2 ¼ ",  and this is the largest I can find.  Because they are open at the top like a Davis and they can be opened a little more if necessary I think I should get these to work.   I removed all evidence from the side decks and started over.

 

2.  Even a Lapwing is hard to row into a 20+ kt. head wind

 

3.  The carbon ferrules are superb.  Not a bit of play or slop while rowing.

 

4.  10" seems a bit long to me, but that might just be me.  I will keep them this way, for now, at the least until such time as I can conclude I really want them shorter, or I learn to like them.

 

5.  Rowing backwards with long oars is hard work.  So I am building a removable seat that will stow in my side compartments.

 

More pictures as I progress.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why on earth would you want to row when the wind is blowing? :)

When you are in a 10' wide channel into the wind.  I am very good at short tacking, but not that good.  Actually Ken, that is the whole point of this oar project.  In navigable waters I find a paddle all I need.  I live in New England.  And as Mark Twain says about our weather:    “If you don't like the weather in New England now, just wait a few minutes.”  Being becalmed for any length of time is almost non-existent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, now just waiting for my new rowlocks to come in and try iteration #2.

 

New removable rowing seat that fits in the side storage:

post-442-0-92014800-1467984761_thumb.jpgpost-442-0-58735700-1467984773_thumb.jpg

 

New rowlock sockets.  Note the escutcheon plates to cover up the residual effects of iteration #1.  I have found that a well done escutcheon plate can convince many you really wanted it that way in the first place.  Shhh, don't tell anyone.

post-442-0-88018100-1467984785_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rule number one: The audience rarely knows it's a mistake unless you tell them. But I KNOW you know that, Dave.

Also, many ancient peoples deliberately included "flaws" in things they made, sort of admitting imperfection, if you will.

I think you just wanted to spread out the load with a wider base...

And, no, Chick. Escutcheon plates draw blood, and the Inquisiton didn't allow blood, as such. Too gruesome, I guess. :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 years later...

I am at the point Dave was with his Lapwing 6 years ago.  I am grateful somebody paved the way for a good solution for back up propulsion.  Now that some years have passed and more time in your boats, would you do anything differently? I have spent less than an hour in the water on Lula and used a SUP paddle for the  100 yards I needed to go with the sails down. The SUP paddle worked great for close quarters but I doubt it would do me much good against tide and wind.  I will have an electric outboard but having oars still seems prudent.  Any updated thinking would be appreciated. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am still pleased with the removable seat, the location and design of the rowlocks and the oars in general.  I think I would make them 9' instead of the 10' Pete Culler's formula resulted in.  I am still happy with the carbon fiber connection ferrules from Duckworks.  I also have a canoe paddle mounted to the side of the centerboard trunk for use near the dock.  It is quick and easy to access and use. That, and the fact that it is wooden and gave me another project to do after the boat was done. I find making paddles and oars very satisfying. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What’s the purpose of the removable seat— to row facing forward?  If so, I’m not a fan for several reasons.

1) You’ll be sitting too far aft for efficient weight distribution.  You’ll go slower for your effort.

2) I think you’ll discover this rowing position to be more grueling that the traditional rear-facing one.  Time will tell.
3) It is lubberly. 


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

How many means of propulsion does one need on a boat?  With sails and a reliable motor, there are already two.  Some Mark 3’s have no oars.  Those who do have them are usually attend Water Tribe events.  My Catalina 27 did not have an oar or a paddle on board.  Why do I need one on a day sailor which already has a reliable motor?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The removable seat is for facing aft.  If I wanted to face forward I would use the aft seat/flotation.  It is slightly aft of perfect, but not so much that you would notice. It is located fore/aft exactly where I sit solo sailing, just aft of the middle thwart/mast partner.  I wanted it to work with the masts still in place. And it works with the sails still raised, though for long distance I would take them down. Lubberly would be using an outboard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good info Dave and Don.  Good point on the need for oars that would seem redundant.  There will be times when I won’t want to bother bringing the outboard with me and would like to have oar back up.  I think a simple pair of 2 piece oars might do the trick.  I was going to make them close to 10’ but Dave’s advice is well taken to make them a bit shorter.  On rare occasions that I will need to row it will likely be in very light or no wind conditions.  I would then move the mizzen to the forward mast step and row from the center thwart.  For close quarters I will either use a SUP paddle or a native storm paddle that I use for that purpose on my Spindrift. 

Ken

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Action Tiger

Rule number one: The audience rarely knows it's a mistake unless you tell them. But I KNOW you know that, Dave.

Also, many ancient peoples deliberately included "flaws" in things they made, sort of admitting imperfection, if you will.

I think you just wanted to spread out the load with a wider base...

And, no, Chick. Escutcheon plates draw blood, and the Inquisiton didn't allow blood, as such. Too gruesome, I guess.

 

 

Tiger,

Well, it's been a good :)escutheon, anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In regard to facing forward, peapods were often rowed that way in part to provide a better view of the rocks when working lobster pots. However, it was done standing. Another advantage is the power available from leaning into the oars. Usually, extended oarlocks were used to improve the geometry.

 

In regard to moving a mast to make room to row, why not stow the mast sticking out over the bow or stern in lieu of re-stepping it? Even with a tight furl, a mast creates significant drag, which is okay if you're rowing downwind but not so much otherwise. My usual practice with my spritsail-rigged Sea Bright skiff is to unstep the mast unless I'm rowing a short distance.

Fair winds!

 

1678417454_peapodrowing2.jpeg.d2e961b7ce73dc755c845d4580ae029e.jpeg415230305_peapodrowing3.jpeg.d55672a47134894028079193ea5d7faa.jpeg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.