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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

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9 hours ago, Todd Brown said:

Great Job. I'll be following along myself as I'm considering doing a build myself at some point in the near future. I live in Great Bridge myself. 

 

Feel free to come by the shop if you want to check it out.

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I got side-tracked on other stuff so I am finally back at this. I reviewed Chick's page but I couldn't find any info on whether he adjusted his arcs for spring back after clamping. Did you? I'm planning on just using a pine 3 piece laminate. I am planning on painting the entire interior except for  a few trim pieces. I plan as of now to install hand rails like Doug Cameron did to tie fenders to, and I believe these will allow me to just butt joint the for and aft mid stringers.

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I did adjust my bending forms for springback.  Too be honest, I just took a wild guess when I did so.  I used four strips in the lamination.  I did get some slight springback when I removed the beams from the forms.  I will have to temporary prop up one of the beams for better alignment with the other when I glue down my cabin top.

 

I mortised  in the stringers (with small, open faced mortises).

 

I haven't installed the cabin top yet (hopefully I'll be doing that in the coming week).  I'll put some pictures up and let you know how it goes.

 

I just finished sanding the last epoxy coat in the cabin and plan on painting it out tomorrow.

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9 hours ago, Chick Ludwig said:

Steve, I added about a half inch to my laminated beams. It was about right for me. The aft one was a bit low, so I used a stick to prop it up when I put the plywood cabin top on. It stayed when I removed the stick.

 

My forward beam is a bit low; I'm going to prop it up like you did.  I'm not going to check afterwards though. :lol:

 

Chick, I plan on gluing the cabin top on one half at time, I don't see any good way to glue it on as a unit.  I think any unfairness in the top caused by this will be in the hatch areas I'll be cutting out later.

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Chick has become a Poplar Man, since he mived to the foothills from the lowcountry.  We got Tulip Poplar in these parts-- plentiful and cheap. The pine up here is different than y'all's.  

 

We also have loads of White Oak and Black Walnut, which why there is so much of it on my boat.

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I just rolled; didn't even bother to tip.  You can see some texture in the paint from the roller.  The paint did flow out nicely; I added a lot of thinner.  The fumes were pretty bad though even with a respirator and good ventillation. 

 

If I had to use this paint frequently I would definitely invest in a full face respirator to protect my eyes from the fumes.

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My boat is in a basement shop (yes I can get it out!). I've got to make sure I don't affiliate the family. I suppose I could wait until I take it outside if necessary. I didn't know that devthane could be applied without a sprayer. I know it's damn tough. I saw Carlita in person and it looks great.

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Red oak is a traditional boat building wood of some note, though has limitations. In traditional structures it was very commonly used in deadwood assemblies. In modern construction methods, if fully encapsulated can last very well.

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I'm not familiar with Devthane so I'm not sure if it has the same handling requirements as other types of 2-part linear polyurethane paints (LPU). I do know that it is not recommended to spray 2-part LPU unless the operator has a forced air respirator. A regular respirator is inadequate. 

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6 hours ago, Mike Vacanti said:

I'm not familiar with Devthane so I'm not sure if it has the same handling requirements as other types of 2-part linear polyurethane paints (LPU). I do know that it is not recommended to spray 2-part LPU unless the operator has a forced air respirator. A regular respirator is inadequate. 

The ingredient that makes many solvent based LPUs  more dangerous than other solvent based paints is iso-cyanates.  When sprayed it is a serious concern protected only by breathing supplied air and physical protection.  The risks are minimal (not sure this is reassuring) if rolled or brushed and an organic vapors respirator is considered adequate.

 

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg388.pdf

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