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Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA


AmosSwogger
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  • 3 weeks later...

Couple of random pictures (I keep forgetting to take better pictures).

 

Here is a QSWO angle adapter for the boarding ladder.  There is a large angle difference between the boarding ladder flange and the transom.

 

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Here is the inner coaming temporarily propped into place.  I roughly planed down the cleats to the approximate angle with a spokeshave, then fine tuned them with an orbital sander (the spokeshave sole wasn't quite wide enough to shave them both at once, while the sander could span both coamings).  This process worked well for me and went quicker than expected.

 

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I installed the trim pieces around the centerboard well opening (the rabbit accepts a Lexan cover).

 

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I purchased this gouge years ago for $5 and haven't used it until now; it sharpened up nicely and worked well to make the insert that fits over the centerboard well opening (I forgot to take a picture of it in place).

 

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Amos, that looks great!  You are getting down to the 20% left to do mark!  (Took me several months to do the last 16%, still got 4% to go to call it completed.

 

 Just got back from the Texas 200 with our boat, good fun!  Southern Express loves those winds.  We stayed on plane for about 10 minutes continuously!  A first!  We have a video of the event and will post it on a separate post later. 

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11 hours ago, Jknight611 said:

Amos, that looks great!  You are getting down to the 20% left to do mark!  (Took me several months to do the last 16%, still got 4% to go to call it completed.

 

 Just got back from the Texas 200 with our boat, good fun!  Southern Express loves those winds.  We stayed on plane for about 10 minutes continuously!  A first!  We have a video of the event and will post it on a separate post later. 

 

Awesome; I'm looking forward to your video.

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Looking awesome......we are in similar places. A surprising amount of fideling on those few items!

 

I am installing the same ladder. Are those lag bolts or did you make a matching angled piece inside to through bolt. (Love the look of the aged transom, but considering the motor mount troubles it makes me wish it was straight or "normal")

 

 

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7 hours ago, Steve W said:

Looking awesome......we are in similar places. A surprising amount of fideling on those few items!

 

I am installing the same ladder. Are those lag bolts or did you make a matching angled piece inside to through bolt. (Love the look of the aged transom, but considering the motor mount troubles it makes me wish it was straight or "normal")

 

 

 

Those are through bolts; there is another angled piece on the inside.  I agree, these details eat up significant time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I installed the inner coaming piece.  Not shown: I temporary screwed down the coaming cap to keep everything aligned while the epoxy set, then removed it.  The inside of the coaming is painted with Devthane 379.  Everything went well.

 

Question:  Do I need to fiberglass tape where the inner coaming panel meets the cockpit seat?  It is epoxied to a cleat, could I get away without using fiberglass here in order to save the trouble of feathering the tape edges? 

 

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This picture shows the storage cut out.

 

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1 hour ago, Steve W said:

I'd say if there is a cleat, you are good. I'd put a nice fillet there and be happy. I see you decided on paint! 

 

Thanks for the reply.  Yep, the Devthane 379 is very reasonably priced (I bought it from B&B).  I dribbled some excess paint on top of the tray that I do all my epoxy mixing on (the tray had dust from epoxy filler and uncured epoxy residue on it).  After it dried I tried to scrape it off.  It adhered to that tray very well.  That decided it for me.

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9 hours ago, PAR said:

I too tend to tape these areas, as mentioned, they see a lot of stress and flexing, so the tape is cheap insurance the epoxy isn't just going to crack with the first fat butt is sees.

 

Thanks for the reply; I'll tape it.

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When I do the edges of tape, I take a light swipe with a 7" disk sander, to knock the raised edge flat and flush(ish) with surrounding fabric behind it. Next I take a smear of fairing compound down that edge with a squeegee, plastic applicator or putty knife. This gets 90% or more filled and I knock it flat with a block or long board.

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I tend to wait until the epoxy is green, but cured, the "easy to cut" stage, then I use a (do I need to say SHARP?) chisel along the selvedges. The little bump/rolls slice right off, and are quite simple to fair in afterward.

 

The sander sounds a treat, too.

 

I absolutely second the filler feathered over the level change. I have also used plastic sheet as a sort of peel ply to smooth faired areas with a squeegee. It allows you to see where the fairing compound is being smoodged, and can leave a very smooth, fair surface. I used the method to attach the skeg on my orange boat. They were hearty fillets with glass over, and they came out smooth with minimal work after because I used fairing compound under plastic sheet to fair it all in.

 

Peace,

Robert 

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2 hours ago, Action Tiger said:

I tend to wait until the epoxy is green, but cured, the "easy to cut" stage, then I use a (do I need to say SHARP?) chisel along the selvedges. The little bump/rolls slice right off, and are quite simple to fair in afterward.

 

The sander sounds a treat, too.

 

I absolutely second the filler feathered over the level change. I have also used plastic sheet as a sort of peel ply to smooth faired areas with a squeegee. It allows you to see where the fairing compound is being smoodged, and can leave a very smooth, fair surface. I used the method to attach the skeg on my orange boat. They were hearty fillets with glass over, and they came out smooth with minimal work after because I used fairing compound under plastic sheet to fair it all in.

 

Peace,

Robert 

 

Thanks for the advice; as a pocketknife collector I like sharp tools.  Chisels are fun to use.  I have yet to try fairing compound, but based on your comment (and PARs advice) I'll be trying it real soon.

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On tape edges, I seem to always be repairing where I slipped with a blade, chisel, dug a scraper corner, etc., so I've stopped this and just wait until it's hard enough to blast through with a power sander. I still scrape drips, filled screw head divots, etc., but have given up on long swaths of tape edge scraping, when a well handled belt sander can mash it down a whole lot quicker, assuming you have the confidence with the tool. In fact, I use the belt sander more than most tools, except the drill.

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