Jump to content
AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

Recommended Posts

Wow! To say that I am impressed would be an understatement. Beautiful job. Your eye for detail is a credit to you. There is a NIS 23 in my club that has the same color scheme and it looks great. The owner calls her "Rosie Red".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Steve W said:

That looks awesome. I can only hope my boat can look that great.

 

Yours can only look better.  The paint sagged and dripped on me; it wasn't drying fast enough.  It was 60 degrees (and the temp was falling), and I thinned the paint too much.  If I had to do it over again I would wait for a warmer day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sags and runs can be buffed out, which is a pro painter's secret weapon, it can be fixed. You do have to wait until it's good and dry (depending on the paint type, up to a month), than locally knock it down with some 400 or maybe a scraper, depending on how bad the run is. Work up through 600, 800 then onto a cutting compound, followed by a polish. Of course, this area will look a lot better than surrounding areas (baby's ass smooth), so you may have to polish the whole boat, which isn't a bad thing either. In the end, you may end up with a boat that is the envy of all that see it, all because of fixing a screw up or two. I've had the exact same problem, though I usually just buff up just the offending panel or side, hoping no one will notice the other panels or side.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PAR said:

Sags and runs can be buffed out, which is a pro painter's secret weapon, it can be fixed. You do have to wait until it's good and dry (depending on the paint type, up to a month), than locally knock it down with some 400 or maybe a scraper, depending on how bad the run is. Work up through 600, 800 then onto a cutting compound, followed by a polish. Of course, this area will look a lot better than surrounding areas (baby's ass smooth), so you may have to polish the whole boat, which isn't a bad thing either. In the end, you may end up with a boat that is the envy of all that see it, all because of fixing a screw up or two. I've had the exact same problem, though I usually just buff up just the offending panel or side, hoping no one will notice the other panels or side.

 

I am going to take your advice and just do the transom; it is the most noticeable.  Although after I level the surface I may just re-paint the transom instead of polishing.  

 

For future builders, one quart of Awlgrip paint (along with the associated catalyst and thinner) was enough to put on three coats if you are painting between the waterline and the rub rail.  Alan told me one quart would do it and he was right.  I even have a little left over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/20/2018 at 7:27 PM, Drew said:

Wow! To say that I am impressed would be an understatement. Beautiful job. Your eye for detail is a credit to you. There is a NIS 23 in my club that has the same color scheme and it looks great. The owner calls her "Rosie Red".

Thank you Drew.  I still have a lot work left (masts, rudder, tiller, hatches, rigging...) but there is light at the end of the tunnel.  To be honest I copied the paint scheme from Graham's boat (maybe he won't notice! 😊).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you tell Graham not to notice, then he won't. Carlita might though.

I learned a little secret. If ya don't tell anyone about your boo-boos, they probably will never know.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's like drywall. When the rooms bare every little blemish seems to scream at you. But when you add the furniture and paintings and other stuff those blemishes just disappear.

 

BTW. I was afraid you were going to splash way before me, but I have the tiller C-board, hatches done. You'll probably still splash sooner. I have a graduation party to host and we need to make the house look like nobody lives here 😬.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, so much "life" going on around my house that I'm beginning to wonder if I'm EVER gonna get this silly boat done! You can see how we've stalled out by my posts. Or LACK of posts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Steve W said:

It's like drywall. When the rooms bare every little blemish seems to scream at you. But when you add the furniture and paintings and other stuff those blemishes just disappear.

 

BTW. I was afraid you were going to splash way before me, but I have the tiller C-board, hatches done. You'll probably still splash sooner. I have a graduation party to host and we need to make the house look like nobody lives here 😬.

 

I don't know about you, but everytime I think I'm getting close to being done I discover about a million small tasks that I haven't even started yet.

 

I may launch it soon in a canal close by as a morale booster, but it isn't registered yet.  I'm trying to figure out the process of registering a homemade boat in VA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With all of the rain, flooding, and mud slides we've been having here, I may wind up "splashing" before you guys after all....or just floating out the door.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who was it on this board that said, "90 percent done, 90 percent to go."  Probably Chick.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What should I use to bed the lexan inserts in the deadlights?  Currently I have butyl tape and BoatLife Life-Cauk.  The Life-Caulk states that it shouldn't be used on plastic, so I assume that is not a good option.

 

What about the butyl tape?  I experimented with it using scrap wood and wood screws; it takes a lot of force to get the butyl to squeeze out.  I'm concerned about stripping out the screws that thread into the Rivet Nuts, and I don't know how well the butyl bonds to Lexan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look.

 

Everyone knows I’m an expert, right? :)

 

If you want to get your boat done more quickly, don’t build other boats at the same time. That’s my advice.

Ahem. (Yes, wiseacre, I AM building the FOURTH small boat confident to the “big” boat. What?! I’m sick. ;) )

 

Also, lists are terrible liars. I was down to the last page on my list for almost a month.

So, how did it grow to three pages again? Drop bears, probably.

 

Amos, you’re an inspiration. We must encourage each other, because we who build boats are the only ones who know what’s up. The rest of the world has no idea. It’s so sad.

I must warn you, though, your kids are probably ruined for life over this. Mine love boats, and building stuff, especially boats. Weirdos. :)

 

Keep it up, Brother. All the worst is behind you. Hahahahahahahahahahaha!

 

Peace,

Robert 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now, Tiger, don't go blaming those Drop Bears for your shortcomings. Just fess-up that you have the same disease as the rest of us. The List is one of the symptoms. He who says he has no List is either a liar, or it's in his head. I prefer the kind on paper. You can actually see all the things that you've crossed off The List to see how it compares to the ones you add to The List. Once you cross em off in your head, they are GONE and all you have left on The List are the "gonna-dos". I always wind up just saying IT IS DONE, even with a whole bunch of stuff still on The List.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Call the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and they'll stop by for an inspection. They'll look it over, discovering the pointy end which clearly signifies it as a boat. They may want receipts and stuff, but it's a fairly simple process, whereas you'll fill out some forms and mail them off. Eventually your title and registration will show up in the mail.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working on the masts:  months ago I had epoxied on the fiberglass bushings and sanded them to fit.  I was looking at the plans today and noticed that these bushings should be 1.5' wide, not 3" wide as I show here.  Not a big deal; I just added some unnecessary weight.

20180403_184952.jpg.0c1703263cf0233e9bc00eb491054a78.jpg

 

 

I aligned and epoxied together the mast sections this week.  Using a straightedge and drill bits as Alan shows in his video worked well.  I did combine a drill bit and a feeler gauge to help test for alignment as I didn't have a drill bit that was the correct diameter.  I used shims in the "V" shaped supports to align the sections  (the shims were used in the supports on smaller sections; they are hard to see in this picture).  This worked well; I'm happy to have this task done.

20180605_194727.jpg.c6f5aa6d9557452e223058cb3be10120.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amos, your boat looks very nice. I think you have shown Graham's design to a high standard. I have found that having masts with no stays makes rigging so easy and quick. Something I didn't do when I built the tabernacles was apply a bit of extra strength near the hinge points. I am going to do that this winter by rubbing back on the outside of each tabernacle and sandwiching carbon fiber and glass cloth between the tabernacle timber and a piece of 1/4 inch ply. Not because I have had any trouble but because I want to make sure that I don't have any if caught in a sudden gust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


 VigLink badge
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.