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An other OC20 build !!

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Still up side down but think this should be her name   ELUSIVE  ;);) (  meaning  :-  difficult to find, catch, or achieve :P )

 

Hope to flip next week

 

 

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"Elusive" as in difficult to achieve your awesome standard of work. I try really hard to make a well finished boat but there is no way I can approach your standard. Frankly I don't know how you do it. Very well named!

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Thanks capriosca !

 

And the flip is over , with the help of 20 hands and 3 layers of foam and carpets :D

 

Lets start allover again with sanding filling sending filling eccccc :wacko:

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Gona have to do some alterations ! Now that the windshield, railing and side windows are cut and fitter , I am not so happy with how the cabin looks in place .  Looks like the cabin is sitting too low inside the hull .  I am thinking of raising the whole cabin up by 3 inches . Than also there must be some kind of a platform between the helm and the helm seat ( even under the seat ) to keep the same eye level to the windshield . 

 

These  photos shows the cabin in its original place and raised by 3" (spacers)

 

Any thoughts are more than welcome !

 

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I think it suits the boat's lines better sitting on the spacers.  How much did you add to gain the extra freeboard? looks to be at least 3 maybe 4" amidships

 

Try sitting it another inch or two higher, see if that makes a difference for you.  It might help you decide what you do or don't like.

 

Looks great so far mate, keep at it.

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When I design cabins of any type, I try to get the bottom of the lights/ports at least an inch above the sheer , viewed in profile. I also find it's really important to view the boat, as it would be viewed by anyone that is standing on a floating dock next to her. Try to place an average person's height about a foot above the LWL and take an image of the boat in profile, 3/4 front and 3/4 rear. This is how most will see the boat, so if it looks "right" in this position, it'll look fine once you splashed her. I do agree the 3" rise to the cabin mockup looks better, but the camera angles can be deceiving. It's one of those "eyeball" things and you just have to look at it from as many angles as practical. I also agree, in that jacking it up another few inches, to find the spot that is "too high" is a good idea and will help dial it in.

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Thanks guys for your help . It really makes a difference !

 

I kept lifting the cabin inch by inch up to 6 inches . It looked best at 4 " . As par sad the point on witch you look at it from makes a huge difference  . 

 

But before I glue in the cabin I have to decide about an other thing because this may change again the look of the cabin ! 

I was thinking of putting an anchor pulpit . This will be plywood constructed that bland in to the deck  , probably adding some sort of frame around the inside of the sheet ( may be 3/4 height by 2" width and edges rounded on both sides. ) This frame is marked in black marker in one of the photos.

 

Any positive or negative ideas about this setup ??

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Just a couple general comments:

 

1. Solid wood glued up would be stronger than plywood as all the grain would be in the direction strength is needed in.

2. Is the slot and roller proven to retrieve that anchor properly without assistance?  Having designed and built a bow sprit /roller/winch system for a Hinckley picnic boat I went through a bit of mock up trial and error before I dared to build the final version.  They can work, but as Alan might say, they can be a "bit fiddly".

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I dislike wooden (solid or otherwise) pulpits and anchor stowage systems. They tend to be heavy and this isn't a place where you want any excessive weight and they also tend to be rot prone. The ones I've liked best are aluminum tubing and sheet stock, welded and bent to serve their role. They're lighter, much less prone to rot, can be removed easily, etc. I guess it depends on your metal fabrication skills, as many don't like to work metal too much. Aluminum is different, as you can work it with little more than woodworking tools, with appropriate blade changes. It's easy to bend and shape and if you can weld . . . I can weld aluminum, but my welds need a few feet of practice, before they look good, so I let my other half weld it up, she's far superior than me in this regard. If your other half isn't a good welder, any fabrication shop can put one to gether quickly, once you've cut and fitted the pieces. Stainless is even better, though a little heavier, still likely less than wood. The ones I like are a "U" shaped sections of pipe, with rollers, slides and brackets welded in place as needed.

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It seems like that slot is going to get quite a lot of wear from the chain dragging through it.  That might be another reason to make it removeable (replaceable).  That anchor shape lends itself well to being stored on a roller instead of using a slot, too.

I've really been enjoying this build thread - So many pretty pictures.

 

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Yes you'r right . I am dropping the idea of a pulpit . Think a short extension will do it all. 

The extension also insures that the anchor will not hit the boat when retrieved.

 

 

 

The sheer frame is almost done and gave the boat a different look 

 

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Any idea of how to clamp an anchor roller where right trough bolts cannot be used ?

I was thinking of drilling a hole  , put a stainless steel stud in and fill the surrounding with epoxy . Is that  enough ?

I can put 5 studs in the anchor roller I'm using.

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Rather than studs I would use hanger bolts.   You can use neat epoxy to reinforce the purchase into the wood.  http://www.rockler.com/steel-hanger-bolts-steel-hanger-bolts?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PL&sid=V9146&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy8zo2O781gIV0lqGCh0KFgRxEAYYASABEgJU1vD_BwE

 

But from looking at that drawing I don't see why you can't use bolts, or at least 2.   Nothing resists tensile force like something backed up.

 

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2 hours ago, Hirilonde said:

 

But from looking at that drawing I don't see why you can't use bolts, or at least 2. 

 

I can do that just on the 2 outer bolts which are located on the extension but the other 3 inner wholes are on the bow that is already sprayed and polished 

 

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I don't see why you can't use threaded rod embedded as you have suggested.  I would suggest using bronze rod for the studs for the best corrosion protection.  If you are interested in a bit more tensile strength, you can widen the bottom of the hole so that the epoxy forms a wedge (cone).  Although the forward location will see shear and compression loading for the most part.

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Tests have shown that machine screw threads, actually hold better than the wood screw threads on a hanger bolt, if bonded in epoxy, as the sketch above shows. I do this regularly on hardware and they work well. Make the hole 30% - 40% larger in diameter than the threads of the fastener and it'll grip the crap out of the substrate. If you coat the threads with wax as you insert them, they're removable, with cast in machine threads in the substrate, which is handy come time to rebed the part.

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I used the same bow roller as you on the 256 and the same anchor design (but not the fancy stainless type). I attached the bow roller directly to the deck surface using machine screws epoxied in to the king plank. The anchor tucks up nicely under the bow. It just needed a hardwood block for the anchor shank to lay on. I don't have a good photo to show you but if you look at the launch posting you will see the setup with a temporary foam block under the shank.  Might give you something to consider.

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