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Gabbyg

Glassing Spindrift 11

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I'm about to start building my first boat and have purchased plans for Spindrift 11, they don't mention glassing the hull but I was thinking I would like to. I suppose it will add weight but are there other considerations?

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It is not necessary to glass a Spindrift 11 but you certainly can. The only drawbacks are cost weight and effort. If the glassing is poorly done it can be a mess to get a good finish. If you have not glassed before, it will be worth the effort to research the various techniques before you commit.  

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I didn't glass mine but I did get pretty skookum paint for it.  I'm only on year two but I don't regret the choice yet.  I would glass it if I had a specific reason to do so, but not otherwise.   I have a cedar strip canoe that is glassed on the bottom and I don't think it's tougher than the un-glassed Spindrift.  Okoume is tougher than cedar of course.

 

Matt

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On a strip-built canoe, glassing it bonds and seals the strips together.  Very important, since the strips are only held together with Elmer's.  The main purpose for using it on a Spindrift would be abrasion protection.  I'd only do that, if it were going to be used on rocky shores.  Otherwise, keep her light and fast!

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I glassed my Spindrift 10N.  Partly because I didn't use Okoume, rather I just used generic marine plywood ($50/sheet vs. ~$200/sheet), and I wanted it to be on the tougher side.  Well, the thing is tough as nails, but is a fairly heavy beast.  Haven't weighed it yet but don't think it would be possible to lug it around in the assembled configuration by myself.  The individual halves are carry-able, but not easily due to the bulky size and extra pounds.  I built mine mostly for my kids to play in, so I wanted something a little more sturdy.  I also like the extra protection the glass offers in keeping water out - maybe not as big a deal for Okoume but didn't want to have much water in contact with the budget marine plywood I used.

 

Edit: Just as a data point, my glassed 10N, when in the water but without any people or cargo in it, still sits sufficiently high that neither of the side bottom corners contact the water.  I'm pretty pleased with it, it's already planing and it's not even moving!  

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The individual halves are carry-able, but not easily due to the bulky size and extra pounds

I suspect the ply is making most of the difference rather than the glass. The amount of glass needed for a 10N would be about 4 sq metres. If using 6 oz (about 200gsm) then the weight of glass is 800gms. As hand layups are usually about a 50:50 resin glass ratio the total weight is 1.6kgs (under 4 lbs).

I see on the B and B website that the weight range of a 10N is 80-95 lbs (plus 10lbs for the nesting version).

Most of that 15 lbs variation must be in heavier ply and timber rather than glass.

Cheers

Peter HK

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I think most small boats need a sheathing, unless you can justify the modest weight savings. Small craft tend to get beat up, so the extra abrasion resistance is a requirement, not a convenience, the way I see it. The few pounds of sheathing isn't going to make any difference in her performance envelop, so . . .

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