Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Chas231

Wood finishing

Recommended Posts

I don't know where I went wrong.  Rolling and tipping the Rustoleum or Sherwin Williams alkyd paint did not work for me .  Even after adding thinner and Penetrol, the tipping made it worse.  I used a Wooster Flawless tipping brush.  Also tried foam brushes.  The cabin I ended up rolling a section until the roller went dry and tipped it with the same roller.  That didn't work for the blue hull.  Somebody sprayed it for me.  The sprayed hull is kind of dull with a real fine orange peel effect.  

I could wet sand and buff the hull or wet sand and clear coat it.  Never either one before.  Any tips are welcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you (anyone having trouble) painting solo?   If so, how much area are you rolling and/or for how long are you rolling before you tip?  For large surfaces it is very hard to do this as a one person operation.  Rolling and tipping in anything but cool temperatures and little air movement requires a constant movement, with little delay between the rolling and the tipping, and a fluid combination of the two, which often requires 2 people to keep up with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dull orange peel blue hull can be sanded and gone over by someone that knows what they are doing. People spray boats and cars all the time with complete success . So with the base coat that you have, it should not need a lot of paint and work. Of course a smooth and slick finish does need the underside to be faired correctly though. So a bit of flattening agent is sometimes employed to remove some excessive work in that process of course. [can't add the quote 21 that I am responding to]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rolled and tipped 2 boats now, I found that rolling a thin layer about 9 to 18 inches wide and with a 4" foam brush in my left hand, very lightly tip the opposite way of the roll, I have very good results. It takes a little practice. I found I had to move along rapidly to keep a wet edge. A light sanding after drying to take out any imperfections and roll another coat. When the foam brush gets too much paint on it, chunk it and grab another they are only a buck a piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roll and tip is all about technique, just like the majority of painting. When you tip, the brush should be vertical or nearly so and a light touch is all you need. What most folks do is: use too much tipping pressure, over work the paint while tipping, working too big an area for the conditions and letting the tipping brush soak up too much paint. The brush needs to remain relatively dry, so wipe it off occasionally as you go. Don't overwork the paint, you're just knocking down the stipple, not painting, so a stroke in each direction is usually all you need, so no back and fro stuff. It takes some practice to get these techniques, so maybe some time on a scrap board, prepped as the rest of the paint job is. Don't try to do too big an area. If the brush is dragging, you've lost your "edge" and you've done too big an area. Work small patches, until you get good at it, say no more than an 18" square. This also depends on the environmental conditions. The hotter it is, the smaller the area you can roll and tip, while maintaining a wet edge. Conditions also affect what the cut and additives you might need. I did a paint job in the rain last week. The paint wouldn't dry to save my butt, so I used a little more Penetrol and some Japan drier. The drier forced the paint to dry in the very humid conditions, the Penetrol allowed the paint to flow and hold a wet edge longer. I was spraying, but a wet edge is still necessary, as the overlaps need to incorporate into previous passes of the gun.

 

Lastly, even if you apply the paint with a wire brush and no tipping, it can be fixed. You can wait until the paint is really cured (a week or more) then drag out the buffer. It has to be a real buffer, not an angle grinder with a polishing pad and variable speed. Depending on how bad it is, you grind down the highs with an aggressive compound, or even fine paper if necessary. Progressively working to about 1,000 grit. At this stage, you move to pads and work through 2,000 or higher if desired. Eventually, you'll get to a point where it's damn smooth and can be polished up. It's all labor and some buffer skill, which can ruin a paint job really quickly if you're not careful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  


Supporting Members

Supporting Members can create Clubs, photo Galleries, don't see ads and make messing-about.com possible! Become a Supporting Member - only $12 for the next year. Pay by PayPal or credit card.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.