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combing height CS17


Dnjost
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It looks as if the combing would make hiking out uncomfortable for long periods of time.  How many have made their combing flush from the center seat aft?  I can see where the forward edge would keep a little dripping away from the cockpit, and make an nice place to fasten a dodger if wanted.  

 

Thought this was elsewhere in the forum, but could not locate it with the search function.  Photos seem to show a mix of approaches.  Just looking for plus/minus factors from actual users.  

 

David Jost

CS 17 - 357

 

 

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Hi David,

 

On La Perla, #351, we opted to just bring coaming around the forward part of cockpit and we have a nice dodger that snaps onto that...it comes back to about where the cleats are for the halyard and control lines for main mast.  Look forward to seeing you hit the water!

 

Phil

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Bandaloop originally had coamings extending to the transom. Yes, they made hiking out very uncomfortable. I planed them off flush aft of the center thwart and am very happy with the change. One's rear end takes enough of a beating sailing small boats! 

 

One suggestion if you go this route is that you put a little interceptor from the end of the coaming to the rail. Otherwise all the water that is deflected by the coaming on the windward side just runs off the end on to your lap. Right now, mine are made out of gorilla tape, but I plan to glue in a little strip of wood sometime soon. 

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John - 

 

This is the second time I have heard about the deflectors for the spray.  Choices, choices, choices.  If the deflectors are put on, the holes for the snotter and halyard would need to be let in, unless I just leave those up in the bow and not lead them aft.  Makes sense that the water following the rail will enter where the rail ends, unless there is something there to stop it.  I also have been pondering how much water might come in through the oarlock sockets.  I guess with the Anderson bailer this is a non-issue.  Might make it damp while camping, but what the heck, you're on a boat! 

 

David

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Definitely lead the snotter and down haul aft. It would be nice if the snotter were double ended to both sides by the way. It always seems to be on low side when I want to adjust it. I'm starting to think leaving the halyard forward would be a good thing.

Anyway, the coming ends behind where the cleats for the main controls are located on the coaming.

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Thanks guys for the input.  Scarphed up enough scraps to get around the cockpit and will make it flush from the main cleats, aft.  A breakwater to keep the drips out may be added at a later date.  Will lead the snotter aft, but still thinking about leaving the halyard forward.  Fewer lines in the cockpit that way.  

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Thanks John,  I did see on the plans that the two lines coming aft (starboard deck) are the snotter and downhaul.  some have opted for the halyard to come aft as well.  I will be setting up for jiffy reefing so that is a consideration as well.  Halyard placement will depend greatly on where I have to stand to tension the reef line as i would like to be able to release the halyard, tension the reef, then re-tension halyard without having to jump around too much.

 

I have to attach the coaming and rub rails next, then on to the rigging.  Making a steam box today out of foil backed foam insulation, camp stove, and pressure cooker.  

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When I built Sawdust (1997) I sailed her before I got around to the combing. The first sail with coamings introduced the problem we're talking about. I planed down the aft portion of the combing to about an inch. I had some 3/4 inch teak and made "steps" so people wouldn't step on my bright decks. The Steps just happened to sit just about where I did. I left about 3/4 of an inch between the coaming and step. This let water flow and wasn't at all noticeable when sitting there.

I also had water on the top of the leeward seat whenever there was any spray. It sloshed around on the outward edge of the seat. I drilled a 1/2 inch hole in the side of the boat right where it seemed to be the deepest . I sanded it smooth and painted the inside of the holes with epoxy with a cotton swab. Then I mounted a small stainless "shell " fitting so no water could ever come IN the drain holes. As it was there was about zero likelihood with the holes at the level of the seat tops. I turned the fittings with the open part faced aft, giving one a subliminal impression that this was an exceptionally fast boat. 

Although I was ready for answers, they never came. Absolutely no one ever noticed them unless I pointed them out. .............and, they kept the water off the leeward seats.

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