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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Based on earlier comments, I had made both sprits a little longer for my 17, and I am glad to have the extra length for flattening.  In fact, I then had to in effect "shorten" the mizzen sprit a bit by adding a little line tag to the clew of the mizzen so the sprit would set further back and not interfere with the main.  That is, it was so long it was poking too far in front.  Make any sense?  But it was much easier to do that than make it too short and have to scarf in something later.  Ask me how much longer?  Can't remember.  If someone needs to know, say the word and I'll run out to the garage and measure.

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I noticed on the updated plans Alan sent me the tabernacles no get the ends glassed. FWIW I tried using 10 Oz glass. I couldn't sit and keep pushing the glass down to eliminate air bubbles around the radius. Hated how bad it went so I took a heat gun a removed my mess. This is 4 oz glass. Hurray. Much better. I think the intent is just to be sure the end grain is prevented from exposure so I think this is good.

 

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The list is getting shorter. April is close.

 

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Steve, that looks good. The tabernacles are glassed around the tops (specifically around the pivot bolt) in order to back up the end of the wood there and strengthen the area around the pivot bolt. It also builds up the thickness on the inside to meet the diameter of the mast. Ideally the tabernacle only touches the mast at the pivot bolt and at the bottom so it doesn't scrape the inside walls when you raise and lower it and the glass at the top accomplishes this. Glassing the entire tabernacle isn't really necessary but I've started doing it for (as you say) protection of the wood. When I do it it usually takes at least 2 steps. Glass around the outside and over the end grain, Then the inside separately and overlapping the first round on the end-grain. 

 

I did the CS-15 tabernacle this way. I'm pretty sure I put a couple of extra little round patches on the inside to build it out to match the mast diameter. 

 

 

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Orienting the glass on the bias to get it to wrap those curves also helps a bit.

 

Here's another thought re the tabernacle. I've wanted, on occasion, to flex the main mast horizontally more than once when it's down and in it's crutch, or as I try to maneuver it around stuff. Thing is, at that distance from the tabernacle, a pound or two at the mizzen thwart exerts lots of pounds of twist on the walls of the tabernacle. I filleted the inside corners, but I'm not sure I was careful enough to wrap the glass across the corners and completely across the inside back wall, but  I kind of wish I had.

 

Fred

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I have proceeded to building the masts. On the mainmast, I'm running a wire up it to carry the juice to the mast head running/anchor light. I'm thinking of just stuffing some pool noodle stock cut in small pieces strategically up it to pinch the wire and help support it. Maybe every couple of feet. This would also prevent the wire from slapping internally.

 

Anybody have a better idea?

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Steve,

 

We do have a better idea. Jay and I used three small zip ties 120 degrees from each other every 2 feet along the wire. It is light, cheap and offers little resistance to pull it up inside the mast. It does not slap or make any noise.

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Masts are coming along between the some time outs for life.

 

I have a question though. I'm about to cut the teak cabin toe rail. Did you all drill and fill the screws or just drill pilots in the wood and caulk it all down and plug the holes?

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Hi Steve, I drew the arc of the toerails to follow the cabin top curvature,  then drilled the holes oversized,  taped the holes up on the inside then filled them with epoxy (and didn’t get any inside the cabin!) then redrilled  and put the screws an bid washers up from inside the cabin with a little blob of buytal between.  No leaks but the black buytal keeps extruding out for a while with every  temperature change.   

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Steve;

 

I epoxied the toe rails in place.  I wasn't confident that screws alone would be strong enough because I didn't make the cleat under the toe rail thick enough to get good thread engagment (I'm referring to the cleat on the inside of the cabin connecting the cabin top to the cabin sides).

 

I screwed it down, removed the screws after the epoxy dried, then filled the holes.

 

If it helps I used a bevel of 13 degrees on the bottom of the toe rail.

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