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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Hi Steve,

Virtually everyone on this site knows more about this stuff than I do, so I'm sure you'll get some great advice. Paint IS humbling, and I totally feel your pain (and disappointment). It is -- not that you'll hear this -- wayyy better than it looks to you. That said, you might think about floating the seams with quick fair, or epoxy w talc and microballoons before laying on another prime coat. QuickFair is much the better option if you haven't tried it. I've become a convert.  Then block sand, of course. Personally I don't think it needs to be a long board. I floated stuff like this with a 4-6" drywall blade so I could really get it to feather out. You could blast on high build primer which would eventually do the same thing, but quick fair is a bit more direct and quicker.  ('Floating' makes it sound like you'd be laying on gobs of epoxy, but it'll more likely be 1/32" or so, feathered out to nothing, unless you used very heavy cloth.)

Fred

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Fred, that thought occurred to me. In fact stitch and glue isn't that much different than drywall! I am familiar with quickfair. Anyway, do you use a metal drywall blade?

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Great idea. I usually use a long "bondo spreader" from an auto parts store. But it can "flex" too much. A drywall blade would remain straight when putting some pressure on it.

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Fred, I am also a fan of Quick Fair.  Chick, on the other hand, uses a random orbital sander to feather his taped seams.  That’s all!  He doesn’t use Quick Fair at all, and only use microballoons when necessary.  His work is impeccable, so who’s to judge?

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I used the Chick method.  That may be because I wasn't smart enough to know about Quick Fair at the time.  Occasionally I had to go back and add another coat of epoxy (or, better, slightly thickened epoxy) after some initial sanding as the skin was getting too thin and the cloth tape was coming through.  I was happy with the results and felt the structure stayed strong. But it was noisy, dusty, and tedious.   You all know better than I do, but I'm assuming Quick Fair is suitably strong, not just a "skin"?

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Quick Fair is just epoxy bondo.  I have some, it works great.  The big selling point is the creamy consistent body is good for working.   

 

I usually just use B&B Fair (epoxy with B&B wood dust and Cabosil) 

 

Others use combinations of the West fillers, I have some of these too.

 

Not sure what you are asking regarding suitably strong versus just a skin.  Are you asking if it is puncture resistant?  Abrasion resistant?

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Actually, contrary to what my buddy Don says, I do use a fairing putty sometimes in my "Chick's method". I use a mix of Cabosil and Q-cell. Usually 2-parts Q-cell with 1-part Cabosil. Q-cell makes an easily sandable surface. You can use Q-cell only, but it tends to sag on vertical and sloped surfaces. The Cabosil stops that. Cabosil also makes a harder putty that is more similar than sanding fiberglass so you don'r "dig out" the softer putty between glass "highs". Anyway, that's my humble opinion...and I'm sticking to it.

 

I tend to do weird things here in the mountain far-from-the-water shop. I've been making my filleting putty by mixing my sanding residue from my d/a sander (orbital sander) with Cabosil. The residue is mostly Okoume sanding dust with some epoxy/glass. Whatever dumps out of my collection bag is good.

 

(By-the-way, don't tell Don. It will be our little secret!)

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Hi Steve,

Yes - just an ordinary, metal, drywall blade. It gives a much cleaner, more even float than a bondo or plastic spreader.

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Not much to report. Pretty nice to have a shop back. Christmas and a few "Honey do's" (Suzanne was owed a few for sure) slowed down progress, but we are back at it as hard as I can right now.

 

Glued up some 3/4" stock for the sprits. I'll shape them this weekend. It's been a non-winter this year so far, so my son Teddy hasn't had a Nordic race yet. That is disappointing, but we're having fun in the shop together. Here's a pic....

 

672630367_2019-01-0219_57_36.thumb.jpg.d7c46a220527fc0b4fd81b8266aee066.jpg

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I tried to send this to Gtaham and Alan through messaging, but it says it is disabled for you two. So here it is out in public. I've never questioned anything to you two where I wasn't just reading something wrong, but before I drill holes in my beautiful sprits:

 

At the mess-about a few members were talking about making the sprits "a little longer" as they felt they couldn't get enough out-haul tension as drawn. I'm currently about to attach the hardware to my sprits and I want you to confirm a dimension for me. Here is a pic of the aft sprit hardware for the mizzen. Notice the dimension shows "2" to attach the clew. 2106013571_2019-01-1309_05_37.thumb.jpg.310ae3abddec626925ca1ace1bb9e5f8.jpg

 

On the Main page, it shows that same dimension as 4" but even if the drawings were quite off, that distance looks closer to the mizzen at 2".

79315398_2019-01-1309_05_18.thumb.jpg.fe248a29438083298d98ea52f8a06ff7.jpg

 

I know these assembly drawings aren't drawn to scale, but I went back and looked at the messabout photos (a few 20s) and other photos I have of Carlita (yes a 17) and I can't confirm that there is 4" of sprit past the clew attachment. Could it be that this dimension is wrong and should be 2"?

 

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Steve,

 

Good catch. I did not see the 4" but I did see the 2" and commented that it should be less. I like to put the clew eye strap as far aft as I can as long as the aft fastener cannot pull out of the end grain,.There is no point in carrying around extra sprit for nothing. The exception is Carlita's mizzen sprit that was extended for the mizzen sheet to clear the wind vane.

 

By moving the eye straps as far aft as possible will give you as much sail adjustment as the sprits will allow.

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Graham, thanks for answering so fast. I couldn't see a good reason to have 4" back of that hardware.

 

BTW, for those that contemplating getting their hardware somewhere but B & B, just don't. I got a nice box of hardware that was cheaper than most places, perfectly labeled in bags designating where they should go, and all the line color coded. . I emailed Alan with a list of stuff I had, and he subtracted that from the neatly bagged supplies. Made my life easier for sure.  Here's a pic right out of the box. Having fun today!

 

829235336_2019-01-1214_47_36.thumb.jpg.8be895b9ff884773e71d5b71430c013d.jpg

 

Thanks B & B crew.

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Steve, you will find all lines  are slightly long.  I rigged my Lapwing as they came and slowly removed some as I determined for sure I didn't need it. Having a line a little long is a little messy.  Having one a little short just sucks.  I would tie a knot near the end of a line where I thought I could cut it and waited to see if I would regret it first.

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I second the appreciation for the packaging and labeling of the lines.  When I started rigging I didn't know the difference between a bed sheet and a mizzen sheet, without the organized kit I don't think I would have succeeded. 

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Amos, I remember you telling me when we were down there. I made mine an inch longer. Having the ability to flatten the sails in higher winds is the first step to de-powering. If you can't move your hardware further out, I't make a new main sprit and cut your mizzen from your old main sprit. Of all the things to make again, this wouldn't be the worst.

 

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Steve,

 

I think that I figured out why the enlarged view gave the 4" measurement. The enlarged view was scaled by 2 and the dynamic dimensioning turned the 2" into 4".

 

We have had some issues with sprits being too short. We have been adding hardware along the way to make rigging quicker and each link we add requires a few inches more sprit. Because the sprit slopes down aft at about 30 degrees, if the snotter is higher on the mast or the sail is not hoisted to the top, it makes the sprit angle down more which requires a longer sprit.  

 

I think that we had lengthened the sprits by the time that plan sheet was drawn. I would finish rigging the sprits as you have them and go sailing. If you cannot flatten the sails enough, I would just scarf some wood on the aft end.

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...and you only have to scarf it on one sprit. Turn the main sprit into the new mizzen, then add enough on the old mizzen to make a new main. I added a section in the middle rather than the end.

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