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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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I came to this thread hoping for pictures and funny Chick replies, and was happily rewarded with both! 

 

I like the curve on the end of your coamings, it goes nicely with the round access hole.

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I like you guys optimism. I'm going sailing up in Maine and while there one of my goals is to visualize and finalize the paint scheme. Right now I'm leaning towards Kirby Green Grey for the hull color with an off white color (still not decided) above trimmed with a few teak wood pieces

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1530/9511/products/chart_1024x1024.jpg?v=1499599877

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That green is a facsimile to the green Nate Herreschoff used on his personal Alerion.  That with off white and Teak should make for a real classic look.

 

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   I'll take the bet on getting through the door (I'm betting in favor of success).  The very worst case is that you'll have to take the door frame out and reinstall it afterwards.  That's pretty easy for someone who can build a whole boat.

   Also, it's what I did.  :)

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I just got back from sailing on a Cornish Shrimper in Maine. I spent a week sailing (and motoring) from Portland to Boothbay Harbor with a good friend. If there was motivation to finish, it's amplified now. While the rigs are not similar, the small cuddy has some similarities and living on it for a week allowed me to ponder what I liked and didn't.

 

I've decided to just run teak rub rails. The cost of the SS and it's hammer like qualities have made me decide to use teak. Alan used Starboard for a boat he was working on at the messabout, and Jay used a commercial rub rail. Both of these are probably the best practical solution, but my Sea Pearl has a thin teak rail that has seen it's share of hot landings and has held up well so I'm going to buy an 11' teak board today and rip it into four pieces and hopefully have enough left over for the deck toe rail. I wish I had paid closer attention to Alan mounting it. I think there was some screws and plugs into stringers, but also some screws from the cabin into the backside. 

 

I keep saying I'm 3/4 done, but I don't seem to be getting to 25/32s. I'm getting used to the idea that seeing the water this year isn't very realistic.

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I used Teak rub rails on my Lapwing.  I figured I would wait for the worn spots to show me where I needed chafe gear.  I am still waiting.

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Steve,  it sounds that not only did you get some great sailing in with Doug but some schooling as well.  Did he charge you tuition?

 

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Kevin.....Doug taught me some good lessons on the thing he does best....Relax and eat well! And I did learn a few things about sail shape on that gaff rig. I can't wait to sail with Slip Jig in the 1000 Islands.

 

I bought an 11' piece of teak yesterday that cost 200 bucks, but it was cheaper than the SS rub rail (that's how I justified it to my wife). I'll have to review the archives to see how you mount this.

 

I'm not going to put an anchor roller out on the bow. I sail with a lot of other folks and I always feel like the one I have on my Sea Pearl is like a big hammer. As you can see from the pic the anchor fits in the anchor locker and I'm going to make a chock for it. In this offset rotated position the mast base can swing by it when being raised. 

499723605_2018-07-2507_18_39.thumb.jpg.2a3d127d1bff3bddb512dd4962879852.jpg

 

So my question of the day is what to do on the bow. I am going to put a couple of bow chocks along the top of the gunnel but I'd like to have a way to capture the anchor line straight off the bow and also protect the plywood a bit in the event of a love tap with the dock. I double taped it, but it feels vulnerable.


 

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Kevin.....I like it.

 

Today's question. Piano hinges. Do I drill and fill all those little holes, or is there an easier way to make sure they don't seep water and rot?

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30 minutes ago, Steve W said:

Kevin.....I like it.

 

Today's question. Piano hinges. Do I drill and fill all those little holes, or is there an easier way to make sure they don't seep water and rot?

I don't. I just bed the hinges in my regular caulking compound making sure that there is some where the screws go through. 

.....and now begins the lively discussion on what we all use as caulking compound!

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Steve, I didn't, but I regret not doing so (I did bed them really well with Boat Life caulk).  I resolved after installing the piano hinges to drill/fill/drill every single hole after that, and that is what I have done.  It is a real pain; especially on vertical surfaces; and really slows down the build, but it helps me sleep at night.

 

In a few places I just epoxied fasteners in place (the forward mast retaining bolt for example).

 

I probably spent more time wondering if should I drill/fill/drill for the piano hinge fasteners than the time it would have taken to have done it.

 

 

 

 

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Steve,

Don't forget you will need space for 150' of anchor rode and 10' feet or so of chain in addition of the anchor itself. Chick put the anchor roller and anchor on a bow pulpit on my Summer Breeze and it seems to work well. I have 150' of anchor and 10' of chain in the well of the 17 mk 3 and it does not interfere with the mast but the anchor is not in there.  In the photo it appears you have a lot more room in there but just did not want you to forget.

dale

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Dave,

I thought the bow pulpit and anchor were for us pirates to use for ramming boats and docks and such.

dale

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Errrrrr......bad morning. Need advice. I ordered the gasket Alan Recommended in the capsize camp thread. The last thing before the final seal coat of epoxy on the cockpit of my boat was to fit the locker lids. This morning I stuck the gasket on, and when I set them on the seats, of course the foam doesn't compress much and the seats stick up 1/4" even when I sit on them. It seems unacceptable to have it stick up like this. An hour with goo gone and a soft wooden scraper and I'm back to square one. Thoughts:

 

1. Did I do something wrong such that the flange should sit a bit lower?

2. Did Alan accidentally list 1/4" thick when he meant 1/8"?

3. Do you all have fatter a$$es (Ha!) than me and don't feel like it's a problem? 

 

Help. For now I'm going to put them on with no gasket so I can at least drill and fill the holes.

 

 

 

 

 

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The thickness of the tape has to be allowed for in the height of the -----(don't know what to call it)----that the hatch lid fits against. Sounds like it's too high. You could use your router with a straight bit to lower it so that it's 1/8" lower than the bottom of the hatch with the hatch closed, but without the tape. When you add the tape, the tape will be compressed 1/8" with the hatch closed which should be enough to seal it. The hatch hold down should compress it. If I'm wrong, someone else will set it right.

Here's the straight bit:

image.png.8827a3443f57f8b2f5d36650336ddd09.png

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