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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Most alkyd varnishes will add an amber color to bright finishes, particularly if they say "marine" or "traditional" on the label. The polyurethanes and acrylics can be much clearer, in terms of added color.

 

The transom I posted is veneers of mahogany glued to the actual transom, with both epoxy, a layer of 3.8 ounce cloth and traditional alkyd varnish. The image was shot in the finalizing the fit out stage. I made decisions to change the waterline height, so it was straight across the transom and also had to fill some seams with more epoxy, after removing the first few coats of varnish (yeah, sanded it all off). The image can be enlarged quite a bit, so you can see the divots and seams I wanted to fill in.

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Hull almost done. Centerboard in. Retrieval tackle rigged. Great time to do that while the boat is upside down for those doing this in the future.

 

Latest dilemma: Not much info in the plans about locating the water ballast thru-hull bailer. But before I go cutting a hole in a perfectly good boat, I'll accept thoughts. The only one I have is that it should be away from the keel enough that I'm not weakening the thick glass laid down the keel line. This also means it won't drain completely when on the trailer. Thoughts please. It probably doesn't matter which side or does it?

 

Oops. Never mind. Paralysis by Analysis. All in. Film at 11.

 

 

 

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I had a few business trips, my God Daughters First communion, kids deep in track season, and the emergence of spring and that American dream called yard work, but today I got a few hours in.

 

Stupid stuff that slowed things down #1: I glued the shoe keel on. I piled a bunch of weight on and when I came down in the morning to remove the weight, much to my surprise the keel was shoved off center by about 3/8 of an inch near the center.  Doh! I must have bumped it over on the fresh glue putting the weight down and I didn't notice. I took a multi tool and cut a slot through it about 3/16 above the hull so I didn't pierce the glass, pulled the keel over and re-glued it. Very disappointing.

 

Stupid stuff that slowed things down #2: I applied three coats of goop to the glass aflutter coating. But after sanding it still was showing the fabric. I thought the Interlux 2000E epoxy barrier coat would fill the little bit of weave that was left, but it didn't in a few spaced. I wound of filling and then using a long sanding board to re-fair......errrrrrh!

 

Tonight I'm trying to decide paint color. Leaning towards green, but what shade!1986058759_2018-06-0314_28_50.thumb.jpg.cde6763b3ffe69523f1c5598899e1fc5.jpg

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But, are ya havin' fun yet??? When ya get upset, just get yerself a big glass of Real Southern Sweet Tea and a can of Vienna sausage, flop down in yer moanin' chair, and think of all the fun you'll have if, er, I mean, WHEN ya get done and actually get out in her.

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Kevin.....what color is SlipJig. I love that color, but since I plan on sailing a lot with you I wouldn't want it to be exactly the same.

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If you're looking for green I recommend Marshalls Cove "Martha Green" available from duckworks.  It is a good old fashioned oil based marine enamel that looks good rolled and tipped.  Rich, soft color unlike the fancy paints that seem to come only in primary colors.  Mine went on beautifully over the two part system three silver tip yacht primer.  Paired it with varnished mahogany rail, System Three San Juan Tan on the deck and burgundy canvas.

The green does heat up in the sunlight but it hasn't been a problem here in Seattle.

Your progress is impressive, keep up the good work.

 

068 (Small).jpg

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   I prefer a light shade because I prefer to live in hot places but other than that...  Green is as good as it gets if you can't get yellow. ;)

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If you have green and want yellow, just strain out the blue, and what's left is yellow. Nuthin' to it! (Sorry, couldn't help myself...)

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You should paint it the color green money used to be. :)

 

Looking good...

 

Peace,

Robert

 

P.S. Track? Cool! I am old, but I can still turn out a 2:01 800, and back it with a 5:42 mile twenty minutes later. :)

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Steve,   It was George Kirby #3 Green Tint .  Give them a call and ask them to send you a color chart.  I really like the traditional enamel paint and it went  on beautifully.

 

https://kirbypaint.com/

 

I've also read a couple of good reviews on Marshall's Cove paint  but have no experience with them

http://www.marshallscovemarinepaint.com/products

 

 

 

 

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