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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Chick,  they frown on that! But it was the only boat relate I could make. I'm Still in the southwest. How do these folks live without lakes and Oceans?

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Gosh, Steve, I dunno. It's bad enough not being near "real" water (saltwater) here in Western N.C. No porpoises, sea turtles, old fishing communities, tides, sand beaches and sea shells, sea breeze, cool stuff washing up after a storm, etc., etc.  But then Don reminds me: No sharks, sting rays, jelly fish, hurricanes' oysters, crow sized skeeters (Also known as the Eastern Carolina state bird).

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I'm back from vacation and I started fairing the hull. I'm about ready to cut the keel.

Questions today.

  1. does the keel go all the way to the stern?
  2. What did you make your out of?
  3. did you just bond it on?
  4. Did anyone add a SS keel strip for protection?
  5. In fairing the hull, I found two slightly resin starved areas. They are glued down enough I can't squirt any epoxy in with a syringe. should I cut the areas and patch in glass (about 1" in diameter) or should I just not worry about them.
  6. In the chine, I found one resin filled bubble. It bugs me and has to go. Should I sand it off and re-glass with tape over it?

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Small repairs are pretty common at this point. You can grind them out and place a plug of fabric if you like. I don't bother, unless the area is in a sensitive area, like an outside corner, where impact is likely. A small 1" diameter area will be tough enough with a thickened filler, then faired to surrounding areas, if not very vulnerable.

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I made the skeg out of Southern Yellow Pine (SYP). 

 

I bought 3/4" stainless steel hollowback and shaped the skeg to match the shape of the hollowback.  A block plane worked well for this, then following up with sandpaper wrapped around a cut off section of hollowback fine-tuned the fit.  I did this on the bench prior to attaching it to the hull (this worked out very well, shaping it after attaching it to the hull would have been more difficult).

 

I epoxied it in by screwing it down, then removing the screws and filling the screw holes with epoxy.  I didn't feel the need to shape the skeg to fit the shape of the hull; it bent in place just fine.  I didn't join it with any fiberglass, but I did use generous fillets on both sides.

 

 Then I drilled the holes for SS screws, re-drilled the holes oversize and filled them with epoxy, then drilled the epoxy to accept the SS screws.

 

The hollowback was put on with clear cauk.  I didn't want water to get trapped in any of the small spaces between the hollowback and the skeg.  I used DAP gutter and flashing cauk; it wasn't labelled as containing silicone but it behaved as though it did.  I'm not sure if this is the best kind of cauk to use; I basically just bought the most expensive clear cauk I could find at Home Depot.  Cleaning up the squeeze out was a pain; I should have used masking tape laid down on either side of the hollowback to make cleanup easier.

 

 

 

 

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1. Mine does, but it tapers down to a point at the back.

2. Poplar. I use it for almost everything, just because it's cheap and easy to get here.

3. Glass the hull bottom first. The keel goes on top of that. I epoxied mine in place. I used a few screws to temporarily hold it in place, then removed them. I didn't try to fit it to the "V" of the hull. Poxy filled where it wasn't flush. I did fillet the corners. Why? I dunno. Just looks better to the fishies I guess. Glassing over it is not worth the trouble, and compounds the work of any future repairs.

4. Yes, full length hollow back ss. I didn't shape the keel for the hollow back, just made sure that the void was filled with sealer. I also didn't pre-drill and fill the holes with poxy. I like what Amos did, but I'm kinda lazy. The ss strip definitely protects the keel from those pesky rocks, gravel, logs, etc. Also protects it as it drags (Hopefully rolls) onto the trailer. By glassing the hull first, even if the keel is damaged, water won't get into the plywood.

5-6. Like PAR says. I would grind and re-glass the chines, but the other spots can just be ground out and blended in with poxy.

 

I use the same type of caulk as Amos suggested. I've done it for many years and never had any problems with it. I use it for most everything. It does take a long time to dry when it fills a void like under the hollow back.

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When I was at the messabout, I told Chick I was sort of a perfectionist and his reaction was "Oh....too bad". It is definitely a handicap. When things go bad I have a habit of not tackling them until I get my head right.

 

This weekend was crazy busy, (Nordic banquet and the end of Andrews career. This came out in yesterday's paper. so proud) but Sunday I finally got back after the flipped hull. I had a couple of spots I wasn't happy with. I'd used peel ply and I think my lack of experience with it lead to a couple of problems. I had a few nickle sized dry spots. It turns out they weren't dry, but somehow the glass had lifted. I cut with a knife the "bubbles" and the wood was penetrated. I'm not sure if in squeegeeing the glass I forced a bubble, but I filled with a silica/epoxy putty and faired. I worried about that? Silly.

 

Amos told me it would be good to raise the stern when working on it and so I had the boys help and now I can get into the cabin easily. tonight I'll glass the stern. I'm still debating whether the leave the stern bright or paint.  I think it will depend on how tonight goes.

 

I am using a piece of white oak for the keel and I'm going to a friends to rip it. I should make stock for the gunnels at the same time. I saw Greybeards starboard gunnel protection Alan was applying at the messaboaut. They seem the most practical, but I took a bunch of pics and I just can't get past the look. We'll see ........

 

 

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Steve, nothing wrong with being a perfectionist! If you have the fortitude for it. And temperament. By nature, I'm lazy, ADD, and in a hurry. Gotta get-r-dun! But I DO love to see the work done by you perfectionists! Stick with it. You won't be happy with results that are anything less. Can't wait to see Jazz Hands at the messabout. Hopefully this year's messabout. But if it takes another year, or two, or three to achieve perfection, then I'll see it then.

 

By-the-way, I vote to leave the transom bright.

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Steve,

Here's an idea you might consider when installing your hollowback - I got the idea from someone else's post (where all my good ideas come from). Run the hollow back under the bow eye and skip the outboard mounting plate that would usually go there. I kind of like the look, because otherwise, the hollowback dead-ends at the edge of the bow eye and in my case, was going to look pretty clunky. 

 

I did find that I had no real wood to screw to between the bow eye blocking and my keel strip. I just bit my lip and figured the 3M 4200 I used to bed the hollowback would hold that section in place. The rest of the way to the stern, the SS is screwed to the keel strip - so it was just around 6 screw holes that have no screws. In the picture below, I'm just doing a dry fit, so there are no screws at all, but in the final, I got screws above and below the bow eye, then the next 6 or so were empty.

Fred

 

20180405_151555.jpg

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frowley, I like that bow eye detail. I stopped mine short, but beveled the end of the keel strip per B&Bs method. Same problem on the screws, but different solution. After turning the hull right side up,  I built up poxy goop on the inside of the bow over the screws. I'll get a picture and add it here later.

 

Ok, it's later already. Here are a couple pictures.

The end treatment of the keel strip. I'll add the section above the bow eye aftwer building the deck. I didn't drill the other hole for the bow eye yet 'cause I gotta order one, and want to be sure of the hole spacing.

DSCN3375.thumb.JPG.93ac3132e0ead16cc2a4c84fb4073939.JPG

 

Here is the poxy putty buildup over the screw points. Now to hand sand everything in the bow area. Mr. power sander won't fit in there. Dang!!!

DSCN3376.thumb.JPG.a324f4cbcc5b1f76b6a449f1386bf261.JPG

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You guys and the finished bright transoms......that's not going to happen. My coated Okume has about as much excitement as cheap plywood. Are those something else or stained? Mine doesn't look like that. The process went well, and this morning I rolled on a filler coat, another maybe tonight. If I'd have thought about this earlier maybe I could have used either a veneer or some marine ply that looks good. No biggie. There are enough wooden pieces on the boat to give it character.

 

I ordered the hollow back. That stuff isn't cheap.

 

".... but beveled the end of the keel strip per B&Bs method. " I'm not sure what that means. I'm trying to imagine that. Right now I'm planning to rip the keel and shape it to fit the back of the hollow back when it comes in. I got plenty of work on the interior ceiling to keep me busy, but I wish I had ordered it sooner. I got two 12' pieces, so I should have plenty.

 

 

 

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Steve,

Your hollow back looks great - wish I'd thought of building up backing from the outside.

 

I really wish I'd thought of putting backing in there after unfolding the hull!

 

Woops!! Sorry Chick, I only just now noticed that was your post and not Steve's! It's the screws below the deck of the anchor locker that are especially troublesome. Were you able to get in there as well?

Edited by frowley

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Hi, Steve,

 

The transom is okume , as supplied by Graham in the kit.  The only treatment is epoxy coating, followed by a layer of glass applied with further clear epoxy, then varnish.

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the varnish i used did not darken it more than the epoxy, or i guess not noticeably.  not sure if you've epoxied yours yet?  pretty much what you see with epoxy is what you'll get with varnish on it, i'd say.  the okume grain patterns can vary, so yours may just have a different look to it, i suppose.

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