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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Now that she is flipped, and the holes filled with pass #1, I have a few questions after watching Alan's glassing video.

 

I bought the fiberglass cloth from B & B. I didn't realize it wouldn't go from center-line to over the top of the gunnel like  in Alan's video.

  • What did your layup look like? Do you run it across in sections and then let it overlap a bit? Do you run fron the C/L to the edge, and then trim and then do the sides as a second step? It seem overlaps lead to a lot of fairing.
  • What about the transom? Is that done by itself? And how do I defy gravity with it's reverse-ness when I apply the glass or was I supposed to do that first, or should I wait until I flip it back?
  • My centerboard fits easily, maybe too easily. I have about 3/16 - 1/4 inch of clearance. I'm guessing this is better than the opposite. Should I shim it when I put the bolt through so it is snug?
  • The slot for the centerboard seems enormous. has anyone ever fitted a slot gasket or is it not worth the trouble.

Thanks in advance!

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Here's what I like to do. Others do differently. I do the bottom first allowing the glass to overlap the chines and transom bi 1"~2". Let the layup cure until you can sand/feather the glass where it laps over the chines and transom. Then laminate the sides, overlapping the bottom and transom. If you pre-coat the sides before you add the glass, it will "hang" without falling off. Or you could use strips of tape to hold it in place until it's wet out. When this is cured, sand/feather where the sides lap the transom. Laminate the transom, overlapping sides and bottom. Same trick holding it in place. When cured, feather all the overlaps. Fill and sand as necessary, Be sure to roll a second coat of 'poxy to fill the weave as you go.

 

You can also do it all in one shot, but I tend to get air trapped along the overlapped areas. I also have to do a lot more fairing if I don't feather the edges between layers. Be sure to radius all of your corners with at least a 1/4" radius or the glass won't lay over without bubbles. One reason to lap the corners is that you get two layers over the joint. No need to tape the corners separately.

 

I'm doing the hull of my boat now. At least as the cold allows, I glassed the bottom yesterday. You can come along with me as I do it. I'll post a picture over there of the bottom glassed in a few minutes. Sides go on the first day it's in the 50s this week.

 

By-the-way, I lay the glass on dry, and wet through it. It takes awhile for the 'poxy to soak through and saturate the wood underneath, but moving the "puddle" around with a squeegee takes care of it. it takes extra time when it's cold 'cause the 'poxy is thick. Much easier in the summer. I just pour the 'poxy on and then spread it with Mr. Squeegee. I like a regular "Bondo spreader". I also use a 2" brush to work some resin up under the edges where the lap the sides. That just helps keeping too much resin running down the sides.

 

As I already stated, this is just "my way". I'm sure other opinions will magically appear on your post. They are equally valid, and maybe even better than mine---"may it never be!" (Dang, now I'll probably be in trouble---again!)

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I did it kind of like Chick -- bottom first, to the chines, and then sides -- but he says it and does it much better.  I wetted out the ply first (but see his discussion above and on his page).  I wetted out first so I could make sure the ply was wet, and since I had precut the cloth and all, didn't really have much trouble getting the cloth back where I want it.  I had rolled it up on a tube and then unrolled it back out.  FWIW.

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I think it is worth spending the money for 60" wide fiberglass.  It would save you a lot of sanding and fairing.  I didn't and regreted it.

 

I fiberglassed the transom seperately and had no issues with it pulling away from the wood.

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I'm going to lay out what I got from B & B tonight and see if I have enough. If I do I'll use it, if I don't I'll order 60". I have many other projects that will use the cloth if I buy more. It's not that expensive and I'm in a hurry now. I finished fairing the hull last night and radius-ed the centerboard slot. I got some gaps in the roof stringers I want to fill so I have some work to do while it's upside down.

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Steve,

 

Here is the link to where I was glassing Carlita. https://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9098-cs17-mk3-hull-3-carlita/?do=findComment&comment=89411 I was in a hurry and glassed the hull in one shot. I was lucky because Beth volunteered to help me. If I was doing it normally I would do one section at a time as you and chick have discussed, feathering the edges before doing the next section. I opted to lap my transom in the center for expedience because the rudder would break up the surface and the print through at join would not be as obvoius . I would normally do it first in one piece and the feather the edges before the bottom and sides.

 

I see that you are fretting about glassing up hand on the transom. While it is always preferred to glass down hand, it is not that hard. Just use a paint roller and roll resin onto the glass until it is wet out and squeegee the excess resin just like you normally do.

 

I elected not to glass the sheer strake because I was in  hurry. I have not had any issues so far but it is safer to do so 

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For vertical glassing, I would (have, actually, a fair bit, and between stringers, too...):

1) precut the glass piece 

2) put it on plastic sheet

3) saturate and well squeegee the cloth

4) wet area on hull to be clothed with some neat resin

5) roll wet out glass onto a mandrel. A closet rod work wonderfully.

6) roll wet glass off mandrel onto transom, using a brush/roller to press it down, then squeegee like normal

 

It takes all the drama out, and you can ensure everything is well saturated without panic and with few drips. Using plastic sheet or real peel ply over top will,ensure a smooth, blush free surface you won’t have to sand or feather before the next step...

 

Peace,

Robert

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Just to add to what I've described about how I glass the hull. I have found that with the dry method I use, carefully smoothed out, then squeegeeing the laminate, no additional filling and fairing is needed other than poxy to fill the open weave, and a primer coat. Naturally, the overlapped layers are feathered as I've described before. There may be some filling and fairing along the feathered edge. Depends on how careful you are feathering, and how "fussy" you are.

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Using plastic sheet or peel ply, I never need fill coats. I use the plastic sheet especially when doing repairs, because I can see through it.

 

The solid plastic sheet forces all the  resin to fill the weave. If you saturate well, and squeegee the plastic sheet (or peelply) all over, the resin will fill the weave, and when the plastic comes off there is a smooth, flat surface. No weave to fill.

 

Peace,

Robert

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Ok, I made a mizzen tabernacle awhile ago. I've got a weekend to work on stuff while some goop dries, so I have a question. On the forward tabernacle, because it;s glued to the ply bulkhead I have no questions about it's strength. On the mizzen, I'm thinking of wrapping 10 oz glass around the sides and forward face to give the side joints more resistance to coming apart in lieu of the lack of ply bulkhead. I did glue in wedges like shown on the plans for the main. What do you all think?

 

And my daughter Helen caught me in the act last night. We were listening to a podcast while I filled a few seams that had some gaps.

5aad3a0fbe90f_2018-03-1621_03_03.thumb.jpg.dce300ff25a819f178884e8d60b3a786.jpg

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For what it is worth Steve, I put a fillet up the inside corners in lieu of the timber quad and then laid double biased tape over that while it was still very green. I also drilled and epoxied quarter inch dowels through the sides and well into the front face. I have had the unstayed mizzen out in quite a strong blow (28 knot gusts) without any signs of trouble. Still, laying glass over the front face can't be bad, but I wanted mine to have a timber finish.

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5ab8fb03e3d8d_2018-03-2519_49_04.thumb.jpg.4553796944be24794d4dd64c3ba4bef1.jpgHull glassed except transom. I'm in no hurry to do that again. Luckily my two boys in spite of being a bit messy were great help.

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19 hours ago, Steve W said:

 Luckily my two boys in spite of being a bit messy were great help.

 

From the looks of the shirts I am finding it hard to believe you helped.  No one is that neat with goo.  ^_^

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3 hours ago, Hirilonde said:

 

From the looks of the shirts I am finding it hard to believe you helped.  No one is that neat with goo.  ^_^

You should have seen their pants!

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Watching all this progress while I'm on a family vacation to the grand canyon is frustrating. The southwest and it's lack of water isn't for me. On a related note, Douglas fir grows at the bottom of the canyon!

20180403_173256.jpg

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